29th > September > 2003 Archive

GorillaPark goes titsup

GorillaPark, the largest privately held tech incubator and business accelerator in Europe, has filed for bankruptcy protection. CEO Jerome Mol says it is a restructuring effort, and that all creditors will ultimately get paid. Mol calls the measure 'not dramatic' and says that the shake-up has no consequences for the 60 or so people working for the company. GorillaPark didn't release any details about its debt. The company, is headquartered in the Netherlands with offices in London, Amsterdam, Stockholm, Ghent and Munich. Last year GorillaPark earned about € 3 million by selling equity stakes; this year it failed to find any buyers. The company was established in January 2000 - about two years after Jerome Mol sold his first company, Prolin Software, to Hewlett-Packard - as a pan-European high-tech business accelerator for entrepreneurs, identifying early stage technology investment opportunities and accelerating them through their critical initial stages of development. The dotcom shake out already spelled trouble for most European tech incubators, who started offering straightforward investments to a narrower range of start-ups. As the venture capital pool shrunk, most of the incubators disappeared. Mol also founded the media company Tornado Insider, which publishes a glossy monthly magazine about Europe's tech investment community. The magazine went bankrupt twice, but managed to survive this summer. GorillaPark's investors include Crescendo, ABN AMRO Corporate Investments, Atlas Venture, Deutsche Bank, Goldman Sachs, NeSBIC, Cable & Wireless and Fortis Bank. ®
Jan Libbenga, 29 Sep 2003

Palm UK web site lets Tungsten details slip

Palm has inadvertently leaked a few more details of the new Tungsten models it will launch on Wednesday, 1 October - the T3 and E. The company's UK web site lists both models 'Getting Started' bundles, each featuring the PDA and an aluminium hard case. In addition, the E ships with a pack of replacement styli, while the T3 ships with a selection of international power and phone adaptors. The Tungsten T3 is clearly shown in its landscape screen mode, and the accompanying blurb confirms the device sports a "extra wide" 320x480 LCD panel. There's no Graffiti text-entry area to be seen, so it seems the early rumours of a virtual Graffiti area are correct. The page confirms Bluetooth support. The T3 starter pack costs £389.69 in the UK and €563.21 in Europe. Click image for full-size Tungsten T3 view Alas the Tungsten E page gives no specifications away, but Palm describes the device this way: "For maximum business productivity with a minimal learning curve, the Palm Tungsten E combines timeless Palm elegance with an advanced high resolution colour display and next-generation usability." However, you can clearly see the new navigator design and case styling: Click image for full-size Tungsten E view The E starter pack costs £166.67 in the UK and €241.33 in Europe. The appearance of the devices on Palm's UK web site comes just days ahead of their official launch on 1 October. Details of the products appeared last week on a reseller web site. ® Related Story New Palm Tungstens debut on Web Thanks to readers Ged and David for the info. Related Products Buy Palm Tungsten E and T3 from the Register's PDA store
Tony Smith, 29 Sep 2003

Fossil blames Flextronics for Wrist PDA delay

Watch maker Fossil has blamed the latest set-back to the release of its Palm OS-based Wrist PDA squarely on its manufacturing partner, Flextronics. That claim comes a day after Flextronics was ordered to pay almost $1 billion in damages by a California jury. Following The Register's exclusive story last Thursday detailing the company's decision to delay the device's release yet again, the company on Friday released a statement on matter. The statement clarifies the "production quality" issues raised by the Fossil spokeswoman we talk to the day before. Says Fossil: "Flextronics, our production partner, has been unable to meet initial inventory requirements for the launch." We understand that the devices may have been ready to ship but were recalled after a last-minute glitch was exposed. We have been given a late Q4 2003/ Q1 2004 release date, but Fossil's official line is that there is no rescheduled ship date. "Once production complications have been resolved and product quality specifications have been met or exceeded, Fossil will begin shipments of the Wrist PDA with Palm OS," the company said on Friday. This latest set-back is the third time the Wrist PDA's release date has been put back. Originally due to ship on 30 June, the device was then pegged for late July availability. As that timeframe approached, the release was put back to 30 September. Back in June, we reported that the Wrist PDA would not ship until early 2004, a date given to us by an official Fossil UK representative. The US parent quickly denied the claim, but it's increasingly clear that the UK information was correct all along. Flextronics, meanwhile, has other problems: last week, as we broke the Fossil story, a California jury found the contract manufacturer guilty of fraud, economic duress and having been in breach of contract. The company was sued by Dovatron, which in 1997 contracted a firm called Beckman Coulter to make blood analysis equipment. BC was subsequently acquired by Flextronics in 2000, a year before Dovatron's manufacturing contract was due to expire. The jury ordered Flextronics to pay $3 million in compensation and $931 million in punitive damages. The manufacturer has said it will appeal against the verdict. ® Related Stories Amazon.com drops Fossil Wrist PDA Fossil puts back Palm Wrist PDA launch to 2004 Related Products Buy Palm Tungsten E and T3 from the Register's PDA store
Tony Smith, 29 Sep 2003

Vodafone to offer Wi-Fi via third-party providers

Mobile phone network operator Vodafone will not be rolling out Wi-Fi hotspots - but it may yet get into the high-speed wireless networking game through partnerships with third-parties. "We have taken the decision that we won't be delivering wireless hotspots, but will support them using our billing capabilities using SMS messages that can bill to other accounts," said Rikkie Helms, head of the company's mobile office division, according to a ComputerWire report. Helms said the company plans to focus on rolling out 3G services, due to be offered next year, rather than embarking on a Wi-Fi programme of its own. Instead, Vodafone will work with hot-spot providers who can offer its customers Wi-Fi access billed directly to subscribers' accounts. ® Visit The Reg Mobile, Wireless and PDA Store
Tony Smith, 29 Sep 2003

Juvenile arrested in Blaster worm probe

Federal authorities have arrested another person on suspicion of creating a variant of the infamous Blaster worm. The youth has not been identified for legal reasons. John McKay, US Attorney for the Western District of Washington, said the accused had been arrested for "intentionally causing damage and attempting to cause damage to protected computers." AP reports that the juvenille is suspected of releasing a variant of the worm known as "RPCSDBOT." The accusations are of the same form as those faced by Jeffrey Lee Parson, 18, of Hopkins, Minnesota. Earlier this month Parson pleaded not guilty in Seattle to offences arising out of his alleged role in releasing a modified version of the Blaster worm. According to court papers, Blaster-B infected 7000 computers. Parson, who was arrested in late August, faces one count of "intentionally causing damage to a protected computer", an offence punishable by up to ten years in prison. His trail is scheduled to start on 17 November. "Computer hackers need to understand that they will be pursued and held accountable for malicious activity, whether they be adults or juveniles," said McKay. Parson claims the authorities have exaggerated the case against him. Parson is one of two people already charged with releasing low-spreading variants of the Blaster worm. Dan Dumitru Ciobanu, 24, faces similar charges to Romania. Neither Blaster-B nor Blaster-F, allegedly created by Parson and Ciobanu respectively, had anything like the impact of the original Blaster worm, which infected hundreds of thousands of computers worldwide. The original authors of the Blaster worm remain unknown. ® Related Stories Blaster worm spreading rapidly Blaster worm variants make mischief Blaster rewrites Windows worm rules Windows Update still standing despite Blaster Blaster variant offers 'fix' for pox-ridden PCs FBI arrests Blaster suspect Parson not dumbest virus writer ever, shock! Feds sexed up case - Blaster suspect Blaster-F suspect arrested in Romania Blaster-F suspect charged with cybercrime Blaster trial set for November 17 New exploit heralds Blaster 2 attack
John Leyden, 29 Sep 2003

World's biggest Luddite to retire

There's shock and bewilderment today following news that Australia's Senator Richard Alston, (61) the Minister for Communications, Information Technology and the Arts, is to retire. Confirmation of the imminent departure of the World's biggest Luddite was announced today by Aussie PM John Howard. Commenting on the ministerial reshuffle Mr Howard spoke warmly about Senator Alston. "It will be apparent from those announcements that there is one very senior Minister who will not be in the next Ministry and that is Senator Richard Alston and that is as a consequence of his decision as communicated to me recently that he intended to retire from the Senate in the near future. "I want to take this opportunity of recording my immense appreciation to Richard Alston for many years of service to the Liberal Party, to the Coalition Government and to the people of Australia. He is a former President of the Victorian division of the Party, he entered the Senate in 1986 on the death of Alan Missen, in Opposition he served in a number of Shadow portfolios and in the last seven and a half years he’s not only been the Deputy Leader of the Government in the Senate but he’s also been a very powerful and effective Minister for Communications, Information Technology and the Arts. "And I do want to say to you Richard, you have done a wonderful amount of work for the Government and for the Liberal Party, you will be missed, his departure is entirely his decision and it is, I know, a cause of regret to many of his colleagues but that is his decision which I fully understand and respect," he said. However, these kind words barely scratch the surface of the man who we dubbed -affectionately, of course - the World's biggest Luddite. Only last week Senator Alston was up to his old tricks after an Australian cyber rights group was granted a right to reply in official parliamentary records after complaining that comments he made about the organisation during a debate were "factually incorrect". But where did it all start? Back in 2001 The Register ran a story in which it was suggested that Senator Alston "may be the greatest luddite the world has ever seen, which is particularly ironic because he happens the be the minister for Communications, Information Technology and The Arts for the Australian government." It went on: "Rich is behind a number of proposals in Australia that would seem to point to an overwhelming miscomprehension of the Internet. He also appears to view himself as a moral crusader in which he will cleanse Australia while the rest of the world descends into hell." This assessment was based on the facts that Senator Alston wanted to introduce a law to make online gambling illegal. He also wanted to make forwarding email a crime. Six months later he was at it again when he rubbished a proposal to roll-out broadband across the country describing it as a "costly waste of time". Then there was his take on broadband and pornography, and how South Korea had become a leader in high-speed Net access. He told one reporter: "Well for example, people will tell you that pornography is one of the major reasons why there's been a high take-up rate in South Korea. I haven't confirmed that at first instance but I've been there, I've looked at what's happening." Still, we know Senator Alston likes to watch sport on TV, which is why he was more than happy to accept the loan of a swish plasma wide-screen digital TV worth an estimated AU$10,000 (£3,600) from monster telco Telstra. At the time Senator Alston insisted the plasma screen has given him an "informed knowledge" about plasma wide-screen digital TVs. One critic claimed that he was "treating Telstra like his own private rental service, with the taxpayer footing the bill". In February this year, Senator Alston got into more hot water after he challenged the Australia Computer Society's (ACS) assertion that the jobless rate for IT workers was 11.9 per cent. Wrong. The real figure is 3.8 per cent, said the politician. Only, being an Aussie politician, he did not put it quite so politely, accusing the ACS of "'blatant grandstanding', using false figures. 'While some might like to claim otherwise, the fact is that it is not all gloom and doom for the ICT sector in Australia.'" And who can forget the revelation earlier this year that Senator Alston's ministry, The Department of Communications, IT and the Arts (DCITA), spent AUS$4 million on its web site - a mere $3.4 million over budget? Oh what memories, such happy, happy memories. So, farewell Senator Alston, you will be missed. But what of his successor, Attorney General Daryl Williams AM QC MP? Well, he's a legal man with a Bachelor of Civil Law degree from Oxford University in 1967, among others. Time will tell if he's able to fill the mighty shoes of Senator Alston. ®
Tim Richardson, 29 Sep 2003

Sharp to plot worldwide Linux PDA plan

Will Sharp ever bring its latest Linux-based Zaurus PDAs to Europe? Postings on the company's own Zaurus developer web site citing Sharp UK customer services claim that the company has "no plans" to offer new models or upgrades here. However, company insiders suggest the product line's fate may not be sealed. In July, Sharp told The Register that it would not release any new Zaurus in the UK during Q3 but that no decision had been taking regarding potential Q4 launches. At that point the Zaurus was discontinued in Germany and the UK. If the Zaurus DevNet posting is correct, it looks like a Q4 release been ruled out. The Zaurus certainly appears to have won some success outside the UK. It's still promoted on Sharp's US web site, which lists two models: the original SL-5500, launched in Europe in April 2002, and the SL-5600, an updated model launched the following November. In July Sharp launched two second-generation clamshell Zaurus PDAs, SL-C750 and SL-C760. To date, these devices have only been made available to Japanese buyers. Both machines are based on the OpenPDA platform, itself built upon Linux and Java 2 Micro Edition (J2ME). Inside the clamshell case is a full QWERTY keypad. The LCD rotates, Tablet PC-style, to allow the device to be used like a standard pen-based PDA. A Sharp spokeswoman told The Register that the two devices had not been made available in the UK thus far for "technical reasons", though she declined to elaborate upon what those issues might be. However, on a positive note, company sources tell us that Sharp will shortly conduct a worldwide review of its Zaurus product strategy next month. While that may not necessarily lead to the release of the clamshell models in the UK, Europe and/or the US, the very fact that a review is taking place suggests that such a move has not been ruled out. ® Related Story Sharp cans Linux PDA in Europe Related Products Buy Palm Tungsten E and T3 from the Register's PDA store
Tony Smith, 29 Sep 2003

Ukraine hosts computer destruction championship

More than 300 sledgehammer-wielding, mouse-kicking Ukrainians took part in a competition last weekend to destroy computer equipment in the most spectacular way possible. The First Open Computer Destruction Championship, held in the central Ukrainian city of Zaporizhzhya, were organised by a local radio station and designed to raise awareness about the perils of spending too much time in front of a PC, the BBC reports. There were three main events: chucking a keyboard, kicking a computer mouse, and the "creative destruction" of computer monitors. Ironically, winners in each category received computer equipment as a prize (but you probably guessed that already). Competitors told Ukrainian TV that the event helped purge them of computer angst. Radio engineer Yevhen Hrytsenko, who threw his keyboard an impressive 40.2 metres to win that event, said he felt "liberated from computer addiction". "Just recently I busted my monitor at home. I was so angry at it, luckily I didn't destroy the keyboard, so I could throw it here today," he said. Eastern Europe, and the Ukraine in particular, was a breeding ground for the sport of mobile phone throwing, which has now spread internationally. Anthropologists are yet to explain why a country with one of the lowest GDP (annual income per head) figures in Europe could spawn such a passion for abusing hi-technology equipment. If you're tempted to abuse your PC, check out our guide: 102 ways to kill your computer. ® Related Stories Man takes sledgehammer to faulty PC 102 ways to kill your computer Athletes train for first Mobile Phone Olympics
John Leyden, 29 Sep 2003

Musicmatch iTunes-style service goes live

Where Apple leads, others quickly follow: online music company Musicmatch today said its PC-only song download service now encompasses 99c transfers coupled with relaxed usage rules. Musicmatch's take on the iTunes Music Store concept was first announced in July. The scheme will see a range of songs offered for a one-off payment. Songs can be played on up to three PCs and can be copied to WMA 9-compatibled music players. Songs can be burned to CDs, but the same playlist can only be burned up to five times - Apple's puts the limit at ten burns. Musicmatch isn't the first PC-oriented music reseller to offer such a service - BuyMusic.com already do so. And Napster and Dell will do so by Christmas. Apples should havfe brought iTunes to the PC by then, too. However, Musicmatch's pitch is that it has broader label support than the other two. While the majors are signed up to multiple providers, Musicmatch claims to offer over 30 independent labels' catalogue than its rivals. That said, it still can offer only 200,000 songs right now, though it promised to have 500,000 songs available for download by the end of the year. The company also touted its personalisation technology, which uses a customer's download history to suggest artists and albums he or she might also find to their taste. Tracks are encoded using Windows Media 9 at 160Kbps. In addition to Windows Media 9 technology, the service requires users run the iTunes-like Musicmatch Jukebox 8.1 application. Like Apple's service, Musicmatch's downloads are only available to US residents. While US buyers have a choice of provider, European listeners seeking a legal source of music from the major labels have to buy from the de facto monopoly provider, OD2. ®
Tony Smith, 29 Sep 2003

mm02 warns of revenue queeze

The telecoms regulator's decision earlier this year to force operators in the UK to slash charges for making calls to their mobile networks is starting to hurt. So says mobile outfit mmO2, which admitted today that service revenue growth is expected "to slow significantly" in the second half of the year as the termination rate cuts imposed by the regulator take effect. The warning was contained in a statement ahead of the publication of the company's interim results to the end of September, which are due to be announced on November 17. For the first half of the year, O2 UK is expected to report service revenue growth in the mid-teens on the back of an increase in subscribers and better ARPUs (average revenues per user). Said chief exec Peter Erskine in a statement: "The strong customer and ARPU growth that we reported across the group in the first quarter was sustained into the second quarter, and our first half results will reflect this." However, the regulator-imposed cost cutting will have an effect on final figures for the year, he said. "In the UK, we remain focused on delivering our full-year target of 10 per cent service revenue growth and a 30 per cent EBITDA margin, although we expect the market to become more competitive in the second half," In Germany, mmO2 says that it continues to grow market share and that its numbers are stacking ahead of expectations. The mobile operator expects this performance to be "sustained through the second half, despite an increasingly competitive market environment". By early afternoon shares in mmO2 were up 1.25p (2.14 per cent at 59.75p. ® Related Stories Mobile networks lose Oftel price cuts appeal Oftel orders cut in mobile phone charges
Tim Richardson, 29 Sep 2003

Buggy software on the rise

Symantec has just released an anti-spam tool called Norton AntiSpam 2004. It filters unwanted email out of your inbox by detecting and flagging unsolicited messages while promptly delivering valid mail. At least, that is what the programmers had in mind. Regrettably, the application isn't fully compatible with Outlook Express 6, the most used email program in the world. Outlook Express crashes when you click the 'This is Spam' button, according to users. "Symantec is investigating this problem," a note reads on its website. "The cause is unknown, and there is no solution at this time." It makes you wonder how thoroughly programmers test their software these days. Buggy software seems to be on the rise. Just last week Apple quietly pulled its Mac OS X 10.2.8 update from circulation after some Mac users complained that their Ethernet connectivity was deactivated following the installation. Sure, the problem seemed mainly isolated to certain Power Mac G4 models, but why wasn't it tested on these machines in the first place? The Ethernet bug is not the only issue, (MacFixIt reported many other problems too). Some argue that any OS that is constantly in a state of flux (like Windows) is very hard to write software for. But programmers seem to think that fixing problems these days is easy. Simply release another update or patch. This way, you can continue developing. However, many fixes seem to cause problems themselves. Other issues are caused by software companies rushing to sell applications before working out all the bugs. Many Oracle customers encountered glitches when the software giant released a new set of business applications two years ago. Well, enough is enough. Computerworld in Australia last week reported that Australia's exporters are in wholesale revolt over plans by the Australian Customs Service to push a version of its Integrated Cargo System software that is so untested and bug-ridden that it is almost inoperable. And it is not just exporters who are complaining. Software bugs are costing the US economy alone an estimated $59.5 billion each year, according to a federal study. Can anything be done about it? Consumer advocates think so. They argue that licenses which protect software developers from liability should be banned so that users or small businesses (bigger companies and governments seem to be protected more effectively through service level agreements) can hold software makers at least partially liable for product shortcomings. "It's crazy that Firestone can produce a tire with a systemic flaw and they're liable, whereas Microsoft produces an operating system with two systematic flaws per week and they're not liable," Bruce Schneier, CTO at Counterpane Internet Security Inc., complained to the Seattle Post-Intelligencer recently. Sue Microsoft? Well, we don't see it happen immediately, but disgruntling customers may soon turn the tide. ®
Jan Libbenga, 29 Sep 2003

Register Events goes live

Site NewsSite News Today there is a new button on the Reg Services navbar, heralding the debut of Register Events. This is a directory for, yes, you're ahead of us, already, IT-related events - conferences, seminars, training courses exhibitions and suchlike. It's early days yet, but there's already fair bit of content, mostly UK-oriented of course. But our geographical compass may grow. Directories need content, and Register Events is no exception: we are looking for as many appropriate listings as possible. So, organisers! Promote your events through The Register. Listings are 100 per cent free. There are more details at http://events.theregister.co.uk/ ®
Team Register, 29 Sep 2003
server room

HP shells out for SCO road show

Starting Oct. 7, SCO users throughout the U.S. and Canada will have a chance to express their appreciation for the company's intellectual property defense program in an up-close, personal setting. The SCO City-to-City Tour kicks off in Toronto on Oct. 7 and then snakes its way through the U.S., ending up in Orlando, Florida on Oct. 29. Users who sign up for the get together will hear "messages, news, and product information" that are vital to running a successful SCO operation. One of the more compelling sessions will no doubt be the 9:15 am "Company Report Card" in which SCO officials rate their own performance. For those not paying attention, SCO is the company locked in lawsuits with IBM and Red Hat over ownership rights to bits of code in Linux. SCO wants users to cough up $1,400 per processor to use the Linux OS, while Linux users want the company to return to the rather boring hole from where it came. The SCO City-to-City Tour is a nice touch to the whole IP affair. It gives the impression that SCO still has a vibrant, diverse user base that is clamoring for the latest details on SCO software. While there are plenty of SCO users out there, the need for a company-backed outreach program is quite slim. That might be why per city registration is capped off at 50 customers. Wouldn't it be funny if ambitious Linux users filled all of those spots? The main item of note for the tour is really the premier sponsor - HP. Just last week, HP jumped ahead of IBM and Dell to say that it would protect users from SCO's wrath should they face a court battle over their Linux use. HP will foot the bill for any server and workstation customers that agree to use unmodified versions of Linux and that sign a somewhat restrictive contract. HP garnered a fair amount of attention for this stance even though it's a bit weak on substance. The HP legal staff must figure that SCO is not likely to win out in court, so why not go ahead and put on the brave act now. But doesn't it send a bit of a mixed message to take shots at SCO's IP crusade while backing the City-to-City tour? Yes, there are plenty of HP and Compaq customers running SCO software, but taking on the sponsorship makes one wonder how much of a friend to Linux HP really is. This is also the same problem HP ran into earlier this year at SCO Forum. Users attending the City-to-City tour are urged to figure out exactly what HP's SCO stance is. We certainly can't tell. ®
Ashlee Vance, 29 Sep 2003

eMachines unwraps Xmas line-up

Reg Kit WatchReg Kit Watch eMachines will ship four new desktops, a notebook and a pair of LCD monitors in time for Christmas, the PC maker said today. Two of the four desktops are based on Intel's integrated i845GV chipset and contain 2.5GHz and 2.6GHz Celeron CPUS, respectively. The 2.5GHz machine, the T2542, contains a 40GB hard drive and a 48x CD-RW unit; the faster box, the T2682, offers an 80GB hard drive and a combo DVD-ROM/CD-RW optical drive. Both boxes will ship with 256MB of DDR SDRAM. The third and fourth desktops pack an AMD Athlon XP 2800+ backed by 512MB of 333MHz DDR, a 120GB hard drive and a combo DVD-ROM/CD-RW optical drive. Its graphics are provided by the T2825's Nvidia nForce 2 chipset. There's an eight-in-one media card reader fitted too. To that spec. the T2865 desktop adds a 160GB of hard drive, a CD-ROM unit and a DVD-RW drive. The four desktops will retail for $449, $529, $619 and $719, respectively, though the Intel-based machines come with a $50 mail-in rebate coupon. On the portable side, the $1249 M5312 notebook packs in an Athlon XP-M 2400+ processor, 512MB of DDR memory, 60GB hard drive, combo DVD-ROM/CD-RW optical unit, three USB 2.0 ports and a 1394 connector, 10/100Mbps Ethernet and 56Kbps modem for wired connectivity and a Broadcom 802.11g wireless chip for wireless links. The 6.5lb notebook's graphics come courtesy of the ATI Radeon 320M chipset, which grabs 64MB of the main memory bank for its frame buffer. It has a 15.4in 16:10 widescreen-ratio screen. Finally, eMachines will offer two LCD screens this Christmas, the 15in E15T and the 17in E17T. The first has a native resolution of 1024 x 768 and supports 262,144 colours. The E17T offers a resolution of 1280 x 1024 and is capable of displaying 16.7 million colours, sufficient for 24-bit colour and up. Both monitors come with a $100 mail-in rebate coupon and will retail for $299 and $399, respectively. ®
Tony Smith, 29 Sep 2003

Orange and Vodafone tap BT for Wi-Fi access

BT today opened up its BT Openzone public wireless broadband network to third-party operators with the launch of a wholesale programme. There's already two interested parties: Orange Business Solutions and Vodafone today separately announced trials that will allow their respective business users to access the Internet from BT Openzone hotspots. A BT spokesman said it would take time for operators to refine their service packages, so that there will be a period of trial before the launch of fully fledged services early next year. BT declined to discuss the commercial terms of its wholesale programme, instead preferring to offer a general rationale for the scheme. David Hughes, chief executive, BT Wireless Broadband, said: "Wholesale has always been part of our strategy, it maximises the usage of our network and therefore the return on our investment." As well as looking for customers among mobile operators, BT is looking to sell access to its Wi-Fi network through ISPs, fixed line operators. BT Openzone's network, which was launched last year, covers locations at airports, hotels, motorway services, coffee shops and railway stations across the UK. BT said that offering wholesale access to its network will benefit site owners because locations will able to offer Net access to customers of BT's partners, as well as Openzone subscribers. Last week, the company announced the launch of a scheme to put BT Openzone access points in many of the thousands of payphones across Britain. BT has set a target of providing 4000 BT Openzone access points by summer 2004. ® Related Stories Vodafone to offer Wi-Fi via third-party providers BT payphones get Wi-Fi PWLAN: hotspots finally heating up Wi-Fi hotspots mean some burnt fingers
John Leyden, 29 Sep 2003

Thus to hit targets

Thus - the alternative telco best known for its Demon Internet brand - reckons it's on target to meet it financial expectations for the year. Publishing an update of its trading position today ahead of interim results for the six months to the end of September due out early in November, the company said that it's likely to report double-digit turnover growth compared to the first half last year. Earnings before interest etc. (EBITDA) is also expected to have doubled as its operating loss halves. In a statement chief exec, William Allan, said: "During the last six months, we have been encouraged by strong growth in many of our individual service lines and by the addition of new corporate contracts that will positively impact our second half performance. "While we remain cautious on the continued impact of financial distress from some competitors on the market structure for the telecommunication sector, we remain on track to meet full year expectations and to deliver sustainable positive cash flow after interest and capital expenditure in quarter four of the current financial year." By mid afternoon shares in Thus were up 1.25p (4.46 per cent) at 29.25p. ®
Tim Richardson, 29 Sep 2003

P2P software suppliers team to fight RIAA and piracy

Six P2P software companies today came together to demand an end to the Recording Industry Ass. of America's hostilities toward US file sharers - by legislative action, if necessary. Grokster, Morpheus provider Streamcast, Limewire and three lesser lights of the P2P stage also unveiled a code of conduct by which they and (they hope) other P2P software providers - Kazaa is notable by its absence - will follow the better to demonstrate that they take the issue of copyright infringement seriously. The code states, for example, that "the user [of their software] shall be prominently informed that the use of the software for illegal activities, including particularly infringement of intellectual property laws, is strictly forbidden and may subject the user to civil and/or criminal penalties". Surely, then, the six members of P2P United - the name of their joint organisation - agree with the RIAA's moves to penalise people who do offer material they have not been authorised to share? No, because the RIAA's action is disproportionate, said P2P United Executive Director Adam Eisgau. Indeed, the organisation is openly hostile to the RIAA's approach. "All sense of fairness, all sense of proportion has left the debate," he said. "It's about time [Congress] heard both sides of the story, and that's really why our group was assembled," added Streamcast chief Michael Weiss. There are solutions to beating copyright infringement, he said, and they have to be better than "suing 12-year-olds and suing your own customers". Alas, he said, the RIAA is "refusing to look for solutions" and would rather "criminalise" the 63 million Americans P2P United reckons are engaged in file sharing. That refusal is why Congressional help is needed - to force the RIAA to "bring other stakeholders to the table", said Eisgau. "Congress has to step in and put an end to this," added Grokster's CEO, Wayne Rosso. "We're going to do everything we possibly can to garner and organise the American public and show them what they can do." Congress shouldn't forget that those 63 million file sharers are also voters, said Rosso. True, but many of them are also breaking the law. P2P software may not be illegal - as the victory of Streamcast and Grokster over the RIAA and Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) proved - but distributing content without the permission of the copyright holder certainly is. The RIAA's action might be incredibly heavy-handed, but what has that to do with P2P United's members? By their own admission, they are not responsible for what their users do with their software. And - also by their own admission - they are opposed to copyright infringement. The dilemma P2P United members face is that they benefit (albeit indirectly) from copyright infringement. No member wants to block the sharing of copyright material. True, that's an almost impossible task with today's de-centralised services, but no P2P member has said they would implement copyright protection mechanisms if they were able to. In part, that's because their software can be used to share not only music and movies but other documents and binaries. The trouble is, the vast majority of what is trafficked using P2P software are illegal copies of content, and without the millions of users using their software for that purpose, they'd be deprived of much of the advertising and software sales revenue their business models are based upon. To be fair, the same is true of VCR manufacturers, CD-R vendors and the like, but you don't hear them complaining to Congress. Unlike P2P Unlimited, they appreciate that the best way to avoid confronting the morally fine line between providing equipment for both legitimate usage and illegal uses is not to draw attention it. True, they're not faced with the ultra-extreme behaviour exhibited by the RIAA, and to that extent P2P United's concern - and Congressional investigation - is justified. And the organisation's members aren't claiming to have the solution to the problem - they merely want the right to participate in the process that will define such a solution. To the RIAA, however, they are part of the problem. That organisation's motives are by no means pure - it represents big multinational businesses, not the artists, even though it likes to style itself that way - but P2P United members aren't entirely spotless either. If those 63 million Americans suddenly decide to obey P2P United's call to cease offering content to which they have no right to share, what happens to its members' incomes? It's not entirely out of a sense of fair play that they are opposed to the RIAA's disproportionate behaviour. ®
Tony Smith, 29 Sep 2003

Yahoo! blocks! third-party! IM!

Yahoo! has followed Microsoft's lead and blocked access to its instant messaging service from third-party clients. Yahoo! set a deadline earlier this month that the protocol would change. Like Microsoft it's happy to license the protocol for use in third-party software, although Redmond's plans are both more formal and advanced (its announced a certification program for third-party MSN IM clients). The move affects many users of software such as Cerulean Trillian (Windows), Fire (Macintosh) or IM+ (Symbian phones, PocketPC) who want to consolidate the major instant messaging services - AOL, ICQ, Yahoo! and MSN - into one client program. Cerulean, makers of Trillian, last week promised user a patch. Macintosh users will need to download the latest version of patch, released this morning, from SourceForge. Whether we'll see a repeat of the cat and mouse games of four years ago remains to be seen. AOL made frequent modifications to its OSCAR protocol in a bid to prevent third-party AIM clients from using the service. It eventually abandoned the tactic, but not through lack of trying. A bootnote to the FTC's approval of the AOL/Time Warner merger requested that AOL ensure its IM services more accessible to third parties. This time, there's no regulator in shining armour to remind Yahoo! or Microsoft of any such obligations. ®
Andrew Orlowski, 29 Sep 2003

FBI bypasses First Amendment to nail a hacker

Citing a provision of the Patriot Act, the FBI is sending letters to journalists telling them to secretly prepare to turn over their notes, e-mails and sources to the bureau. Should we throw out the First Amendment to nail a hacker, writes SecurityFocus columnist Mark Rasch. Frequent readers of this space know that I am no apologist for hackers like Adrian Lamo, who, in the guise of protection, access others' computer systems without authorization, and then publicize these vulnerabilities. When Lamo did this to the New York Times, he violated two of my cardinal rules: Don't make enemies with people appointed for life by the President of the United States; and don't make enemies of people who buy their ink by the gallon. Now, in the scope of prosecuting Lamo, the FBI is doing the hacker one better by violating both of these precepts in one fell swoop. The Bureau recently sent letters to a handful of reporters who have written stories about the Lamo case -- whether or not they have actually interviewed Lamo. The letters warn them to expect subpoenas for all documents relating to the hacker, including, apparently, their own notes, e-mails, impressions, interviews with third parties, independent investigations, privileged conversations and communications, off the record statements, and expense and travel reports related to stories about Lamo. In short, everything. The notices make no mention of the protections of the First Amendment, Department of Justice regulations that restrict the authority to subpoena information from journalists, or the New York law that creates a "newsman's shield" against disclosure of certain confidential information by reporters. Instead, the FBI has threatened to put these reporters in jail unless they agree to preserve all of these records while they obtain a subpoena for them under provisions amended by the USA-PATRIOT Act. The government also officiously informed the reporters that this is an "official criminal investigation" and asks that they not disclose the request to preserve documents, or the contents of the letter, to anyone -- presumably including their editors, directors, or lawyers -- under the implied threat of prosecution for obstruction of justice. That's why you're reading about the letters for the first time here. They do this despite the fact that, had they actually obtained and issued a subpoena for these documents, the federal criminal procedure rules would have prohibited the imposition of any obligation of secrecy unless the Justice Department obtained a "gag" order on the press -- a rare event indeed. All of this began the day after the Attorney General advised all United States Attorney's Offices to prosecute each and every criminal offense with the harshest possible penalties, instead of the previous policy of prosecuting cases with the penalties that most accurately reflect the seriousness of the offense. Thus, journalists be forewarned -- your government may be seeking to throw the book at you! Believe it or not, this isn't even the worst of it. Patriot Games The demand that journalists preserve their notes is being made under laws that require ISP's and other "providers of electronic communications services" to preserve, for example, e-mails stored on their service, pending a subpoena, under a statute modified by the USA-PATRIOT Act. The purpose of that law was to prevent the inadvertent destruction of ephemeral electronic records pending a subpoena. For example, you could tell an ISP that you were investigating a hacking case, and that they should preserve the audit logs while you ran to the local magistrate for a subpoena. It was never intended to apply to journalist's records. Similarly, the letters go on to inform the reporters that the FBI intends to get an order for production of records under the Electronic Communication Transactional Records Act, a statute that applies only to ISPs. Citing that law, they insist that the journalist is mandated to preserve records for at least the next three months and possibly longer. This demand is all the more egregious in that it comes more than a year after the articles and interviews first appeared -- after any actual Internet logs would have been routinely deleted. There are times -- few and far between -- when it may be essential in a criminal investigation or prosecution to subpoena a member of the press. Say, for example, a cameraman gets a picture of a crime in progress, and the photograph or videotape is published or broadcast, and the prosecution seeks to use it at trial. Or suppose that O.J. Simpson, after the murders in Brentwood, chose to unload his soul to Barbara Walters. That admission may require hauling Ms. Walters to the stand, if -- and this is a big "if" -- there is no other way to obtain crucial evidence. But before a subpoena can be issued to a reporter under federal regulations and internal DOJ guidelines, not only must the Attorney General personally approve the subpoena, but prosecutors are instructed to use all reasonable efforts to get the information from other sources. The New York State newsman's shield law that applies to the Lamo prosecution requires essentially the same thing. Even if such a subpoena is issued, government regulations mandate that, absent exigent circumstances, it must be limited to the verification of published information, and to such surrounding circumstances as relate to the accuracy of the published information. Breaking the Rules And yet, the FBI is demanding that reporters preserve every scrap of documentation about everything having to do with Adrian Lamo -- and has expressly told them that if they fail to do this for at least three months, and perhaps longer, they can expect to be prosecuted for contempt of court. The DOJ guidelines also mandate that before a subpoena is issued, even for public information (e.g., a copy of a Dateline NBC videotape), there has to be a good faith effort to obtain the records by negotiation with the reporter. But no negotiation has occurred in this case. I wish I could say this was a first. But in May of 2002, prosecutors investigating the very same Lamo case issued an unauthorized subpoena to MSNBC.com's Bob Sullivan for his notes and records. The subpoena was hastily withdrawn when it was noted that it had never been approved by the Attorney General, as mandated by regulation, and that the prosecutor -- who was reported as "inexperienced" -- didn't even realize that he had to obtain such approval. And in March of 2001, the Department of Justice subpoenaed then-Wired.com reporter Declan McCullagh to testify in a criminal case, also in violation of the regulations. While the FBI has reportedly told reporters that this time they will seek Attorney General approval before issuing subpoenas, there does not appear to have been any effort to obtain any that approval before threatening to prosecute these reporters with obstruction of justice under a statute that facially does not apply to them. It's as though the FBI believes that Attorney General approval is a mere formality, ignoring the regulations that require negotiations with reporters first, and reportedly stating that all reporters can expect to be required to "turn it all over." So why would the government need to put a reporter on the stand to testify that she interviewed Adrian Lamo, and that Lamo confessed? Presumably to demonstrate that Lamo in fact hacked into the New York Times. I would certainly hope that the government would be able to prove this through other means -- like the IP logs. But if you peruse the affidavit submitted by the FBI to arrest Adrian Lamo, you begin to wonder. The affidavit is rife with references to articles written by Security Focus reporter Kevin Poulsen, and MSNBC.com's Sullivan, as their principal "evidence" of Lamo's guilt. Might it be helpful to the government to enlist all journalists Lamo spoke to as criminal investigators -- doing the prosecutors' job for them? Sure. Would it make the FBI's job easier? No doubt. But the law requires that the information sought by subpoena be highly relevant and not available elsewhere. The government has not even tried to make this showing. Nor have they limited their request to preserve evidence to verification of the published information. In fact, if all they wanted was verification of published information, no document preservation would be necessary. You simply call the reporter to the stand and ask, "Hey, when you said in your article that Lamo confessed, was that true?" End of subpoena. So there must be a more sinister motive behind this preservation request. And there must be a more sinister motive behind using the ISP statute to do so. Secret Orders There are really only three reasons the government would invoke the ISP statute against journalists. All of these possibilities are frightening in their implications. They may think that reporters who write stories for online publications or who use e-mail to communicate with sources (and whose news organizations maintain their own Internet connections) are, in fact, "providers of electronic communications" under the law. The statute is clearly geared at mandating the preservation of ephemeral electronic records by ISP's, but perhaps the Department of Justice is attempting to use the fact that reporters use electronic communications as a jurisdictional hook to order them to preserve their physical notes -- a dramatic, unprecedented and unwarranted expansion of the statute. More sinister is the possibility that these letters were never intended to go to the reporters at all, but rather were actually intended to go to their ISPs. You see, the regulation that mandates Attorney General approval applies only to subpoenas to reporters, or to telephone companies to get a reporter's telephone records. Because the regulation is 20-years-old, it does not address the possibility that you could actually get the content of a reporters communications from a third party -- an ISP -- without subpoenaing the reporter herself. So the whole thing could be intended as an end-run around for the First Amendment. Finally, it is possible that the FBI knew that the ISP statute didn't apply to the reporters, but simply wanted to threaten or intimidate them with the possibility of an obstruction of justice prosecution. But, as the Enron auditors at Arthur Anderson learned, all the government has to do is tell the reporters that their information may be relevant to the prosecution or defense of the case, and this would put them on notice that destroying their records in anticipation of litigation would constitute obstruction. There was no need for the heavy handed threat. None of this explains the cloak of secrecy the FBI has thrown over the whole affair. Reporters are being told that this is an official criminal investigation, and asked not to tell anyone. Even the DOJ's proposals for secret administrative subpoenas announced this month as part of USA-PATRIOT II would allow recipients of such subpoenas to confer with their own lawyers and others necessary to enforce the subpoena. The FBI request here made it clear that they didn't want the reporters talking to anyone, because that would supposedly harm the ongoing criminal investigation. And yet the FBI publicly announced to the world, through a Wired.com reporter, their intention to subpoena every journalist who ever talked to Adrian Lamo. Apparently, the FBI can talk about their intention to subpoena reporters, and mention specific reporters' names in the Lamo affidavit, but if journalists have the temerity to mention it to their own lawyers, this could devastate the prosecution. I've never spoken to Adrian Lamo, but I am sure that by writing this article, I am making myself a target for subpoenas, search warrants (government, take note that the law prohibits search warrants for reporter's notes) and demands to preserve evidence. All I have to say is, quoting President George W. Bush, "Bring it on." Copyright © 2003, Mark D. Rasch, J.D., is a former head of the Justice Department's computer crime unit, and now serves as Senior Vice President and Chief Security Counsel at Solutionary Inc.
Mark Rasch, 29 Sep 2003
Broken CD with wrench

Quantum bulks up tape kit with Mako

Quantum has stepped up its enterprise tape library product line with the introduction of the Mako PX720 - a high capacity system that provides several high-end features at no additional cost. A single Mako frame can hold up to 20 DLTtape or LTO Ultrium tape drives and up to 732 slots. This gives the product a total capacity of 146 TB. It's also possible to link up to five Mako frames together to scale up to 732TB, if you need an unbelievable amount of storage. Quantum is throwing in a few nice extras with the Mako system. Redundant cooling and power systems come standard along with a basic set of library management software. Quantum also says it has redesigned the library's robotics so that more than three million swaps can be performed before a failure crops up. The system supports a variety of connection options, including SCSI, bridged Fibre Channel, native Fibre Channel and Gigabit Ethernet. The box can also be sliced up into different partitions, which Quantum bills as a nice storage consolidation tool. A "typical configuration" with eight drives, 718 slots and native Fibre Channel will come in at around $223,050. Base configurations begin below $93,000. In this price range, Quantum is clearly going after ADIC and Storage Tek's enterprise accounts. Along with the massive system, Quantum is offering one of the most bizarre promotions ever seen in the storage industry. Customers searching for DLTtape products are encouraged to compete for one year's worth of free gasoline. It's not clear what the relationship is between tape drives and gas, but it's a nice promo nonetheless. ®
Ashlee Vance, 29 Sep 2003

Sun erases fourth quarter profit with $1 billion charge

Upon further review, Sun Microsystems has altered its fourth quarter financial figures to show a net loss of $1.04 billion where it once posted a $12 million net gain. This rather drastic shift comes as a result of a $1.05 billion non-cash charge in its fourth quarter, which ended June 30. The charge was taken "to increase a valuation allowance for its net deferred tax assets in accordance with the Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (SAFS) No. 109," Sun said in a statement. Basically, Sun's first fiscal quarter, which just ended, came in worse than expected, so the company has made an adjustment to offset some of the loss. Sun had reported a $12 million profit in the fourth quarter of 2003, but this now becomes a $1.04 billion or $0.32 per share loss. The Sun statement explaining the accounting move was written in what you might call "things have gone terribly wrong speak," which made it tough to understand. Thankfully, an industry analyst provided a clear explanation over on TheStreet.com. "You're only allowed to record the benefit from a deferred tax asset if you're more than 50% confident that you will have taxable assets in the future that are sufficient to absorb it," Robert Willens, an accounting and tax analyst at Lehman told TheStreet.com. "What they're telling you is that their level of confidence in their ability to generate taxable income in the future has taken a turn for the worse; their level of confidence has dipped below the 50% line. It's clearly not a positive development. The larger the valuation allowance, the lower your confidence level in your ability to generate any sort of income." Sun is expecting to post a first quarter loss of between $0.07 and $0.10 per share. Sun said the period has been "a particularly difficult quarter for the company due in part to intense market and competitive dynamics." Analysts were looking for Sun to report a loss of $0.02 per share for the quarter. Sun has been struggling to reach profitability over the last couple of years, as the company has been hit hard by a slowdown in hardware spending. In recent quarters, main rival IBM has managed to scoop up some of Sun's share in the prized market for Unix servers. In addition, analysts charge that Linux servers pose a threat to Sun's Unix business. To help offset the decline in sales, Sun this month announced that it would layoff 1,000 workers. In addition to cost-cutting measures, Sun is trying to boost software sales with its new Java Enterprise Systems and Java Desktop System software packages. Both sets of software are priced well below what rivals offer and could spark growth for the company. The earnings revision, however, comes as a major blow. Sun has wiped out one of its few profitable quarters in recent memory. The company is also saying that things are looking worse than expected. The first fiscal quarter report is due out in mid-October. Investors punished Sun shares in after-hours trading, following the earnings announcement. Sun's stock had fallen 8.29 percent to $3.54 at the time of this report. ®
Ashlee Vance, 29 Sep 2003

Send a strongly worded legal letter, censor a Web page

The Bank of Ireland (BoI) has forced a university to remove a site containing a tool to generate banking codes. Software developer Martin Gallwey developed a tool to generate International Bank Account Numbers (IBANs) after the BoI failed to supply him with the correct information he needed to transfer money from a German bank to his account in Ireland. According to Gallway, the Bank even gave him the wrong number to phone about the problem. Instead of re-requesting the correct information, Gallwey (who was in Australia at the time and disinclined to shell out for expensive international calls) went DIY and knocked up a tool to generate the codes he needed. Gallwey told The Register: "I then decided to find out what an IBAN actually was, and with the help of the European Committee for Banking Standard's website, I was able to find out this information. I wrote a quick programme to generate my IBAN and then used it to transfer the money I needed to transfer. Rather than waste my new-found knowledge I decided to put it on the Web for the benefit of people who might find themselves in a similar bind.” Gallwey posted the tool, which was derived from publicly available information, on a website hosted by the University of Limerick. He made his source code publicly viewable as he thought the tool could be useful to programmers in the finance sector. Gallwey considered releasing the program under the Lesser GNU Public Licence, he tells us. Nastygram Two months later the BoI got wind of the site and fired off a legal nastygram to the University, demanding that the page be pulled. A solicitor for the Bank of Ireland's group legal department, wrote to the University of Limerick claiming that Gallwey’s site was irresponsible. The bank threatened further action unless Limerick's webmaster complied with its demand to pull the page. The BoI letter to the University said: “Third party calculators such as this carry serious risks, including risk of loss of funds, risk of extra customer charges and a relevant reputational risk for the relevant financial institutions. Furthermore, the website quotes from the Bank of Ireland website without the authority of the Bank. It also contains text which is potentially defamatory of the Bank of Ireland.” “We refer you to http://www.ecbs.org/iban.htm which contains a specific warning from the European Committee of Banking Services (“ECBS”) against the existence of such third party calculators. It requires banks to ensure that third party calculators such as appears on your website are immediately withdrawn". On receiving the letter, the University blocked access to Gallwey's website. The site was taken down before Gallway had a chance to respond to the BoI's accusations. Paper tiger So how much substance is there to the Bank of Ireland’s complaints? Let's consider the argument that Gallwey lifted content from the Bank of Ireland's site without permission. As Gallwey points out the text he quotes is copied from the European Union's website, which is covered by a copyright notice stating that "reproduction is authorised, provided the source is acknowledged, save where otherwise stated". So a clear case of fair use? We think so. Dai Davis, a consultant lawyer at Nabarro Nathanson, agrees: "The Bank of Ireland can't claim copyright on something where it isn't their content in the first place. They copied it too." On his IBAN web page, Gallwey included a brief, unemotional description of his experiences in getting the wrong code from the Bank of Ireland. This was defamatory, according to the BoI. In our opinion, this is raised by the bank simply as a way of forcing the University of Limerick into pulling the site. The BoI's assertion on this point is questionable, according to Davis: "If you're the Web admin of a University and you get a sternly worded legal letter from a bank saying a site you control is hosting something illegal, you're going to pull the plug and ask questions afterwards. The current legal climate makes it easy to frighten someone into acting. Organisations are obliged to be cautious." The Bank of Ireland's main objection - that the tool Gallway produced was somehow dangerous - is partly supported by the relevant international banking institution, the ECBS. In response to Gallwey's queries the ECBS said: "The availability on the web of tools that run the risk of providing incorrect IBANs is to be discouraged." "If your site promises to generate IBANs for others, you should be aware that you should be held liable for incorrect, delayed or wrong payment," it wrote. Gallwey argues that all he is doing is implementing a public standard. Also the tool isn’t illegal. But he has taken the ECBS' criticism on board and suggests a compromise whereby his page is reinstated, but with a caveat stating that people should only use the programme at their own risk and that the ECBS recommends that customers obtain this information from their own banks. Almost a month later, the Bank of Ireland has yet to respond to Gallway’s invitation to withdraw its objections to his site. And why would it when it has already achieved its objectives in getting Gallwey 's site taken offline? Gallwey says the case raises wider questions about Net rights. He asks: "If a corporation can get access to my website removed by sending a strongly worded letter, not backed up by any court ruling, then just how free are we to post content on the Web?" ®
John Leyden, 29 Sep 2003

BT and 118 888 clash in ‘half price’ slogan row

BT is claiming victory today after insisting that it has forced the operator of the 118 888 directory enquiries (DQ) service to withdraw its claim that it's "half the price of BT directory enquiries" from its advertising. The monster telco claims Conduit - the company behind 118 888 - has provided a "written undertaking following the threat of legal action by BT on the grounds that such a claim was inaccurate and highly misleading". In a statement BT Directories chief exec, Paul Elliott, said: "BT challenged Conduit's claim that 118 888 is half the price of BT Directory Enquiries because it is just not true. The only truth is that Conduit has been misleading customers. "When you take into account the full spectrum of calls to BT Directory Enquiries, as well as the range of our services for residential customers and businesses, Conduit has no grounds to claim its price is half ours. Therefore, the decision to withdraw the slogan from all its advertising is very welcome," he said. However, the move has incensed Conduit. While it admits BT wrote a legal letter setting out its case, Conduit maintains it replied informing BT that it was already planning to drop the "half the price of BT directory enquiries" slogan from the end of September since that ad campaign was coming to an end . A spokesman for Conduit insisted that this move "was not the result of any threat of legal action". Said the spokesman: "If BT wants to make an issue out of this we're more than happy to look into this [the half price claims]. And on the issue of whether 118 888 is half the price of BT's DQ service the spokesman said: "It's up to consumers to decide." ®
Tim Richardson, 29 Sep 2003