28th > August > 2002 Archive

Nortel axes 7,000 jobs

Nortel is to axe a further 7,000 jobs amid warnings that it will once again miss its revenue target.The company blamed the job cuts on the depressed telco sector, and in particular, on further reductions in spending by service providers in the US.
Tim Richardson, 28 Aug 2002

HP, Dell ditch MS Works for WordPerfect

Hewlett-Packard is to pre-install Corel's WordPerfect suite on its consumer PCs, a blow to market leader Microsoft.
ElectricNews.net, 28 Aug 2002

ISOC says will not see any .org Revenue

ComputerWire, 28 Aug 2002

SCO and Co. shore up UnitedLinux

ComputerWire, 28 Aug 2002

Worldwide server revenue drops 13% in Q2

Worldwide revenue for server hardware dropped 13% in the second quarter, compared to the same period last year, according to the latest figures from Gartner Inc's Dataquest unit.
ComputerWire, 28 Aug 2002

A whisper of a hint of a light at the end of the IT spending tunnel

ComputerWire, 28 Aug 2002

HP hits Q3 targets, shoots for same in Q4

ComputerWire, 28 Aug 2002

KaZaA poisoned with salted files?

Is there a conspiracy to flood the KaZaA file-sharing network with bad files?
John Leyden, 28 Aug 2002

Felt-tip marker hack for copy-protect CDs ‘completely neutralized’

Israel-based Midbar Tech announced yesterday that 10 million CDs using its Cactus Data Shield technology have been released in Japan, bringing the total number of music CDs using the controversial copy-protection utility to about 30 million. Coincidentally, a Japanese entrepreneur is credited with the 1962 invention of the versatile writing instrument called the fibre- or felt-tip pen.
Tina Gasperson, 28 Aug 2002

Lamo bumped from NBC after hacking them

Kevin Poulsen, 28 Aug 2002

Internet anonymity for Linux newbies

One of the most attractive things about Linux is the number of installation options one is presented with and how tempting it is to customize. But for a newbie, in terms of Web security and PC hygiene, that's also the worst thing about it. The fact is, Windows is easier than Linux for a casual user to make fairly secure, whereas Linux is easier than Windows for a power user to make very secure.
Thomas C Greene, 28 Aug 2002
Broken CD with wrench

Oracle cleans up pricing act

We popped over to Oracle's Web site today to take a gander at the Software Investment Guide, designed by the database giant to clarify its arcane pricing.
Drew Cullen, 28 Aug 2002

Canada preps Internet snoopers charter

The Canadian Government has published proposals to increase law enforcement powers to monitor the country's citizens online.
John Leyden, 28 Aug 2002

25m use DSL worldwide

More than 25 million homes and businesses around the world are hooked up to DSL, according to the latest stats from analysts Point Topic.
Tim Richardson, 28 Aug 2002

ADSL registration cheats don't prosper

Broadband cheats have been warned not to fiddle BT Wholesale's broadband pre-registration system.
Tim Richardson, 28 Aug 2002

UK clamps down on IT work permits

Tech workers from overseas will find it harder to obtain UK work permits, following the government's decision to remove all IT jobs from its shortage occupation list. The change to so-called Tier One Fast Track Visas (FTV) takes effect on September 1.
Drew Cullen, 28 Aug 2002

Einstein fends off Reality Distortion Field

Ever since the launch of the G4 line, Apple has used the phrase "faster than light" to describe the new CPU.
Andrew Orlowski, 28 Aug 2002

Win2k SP3, the ‘snooper’ licence, and the workaround

We've had quite a few emails from Windows 2000 Service Pack refuseniks who propose not to go anywhere near SP3 on the grounds that the installation insists you agree to the new-look Microsoft 'snooper's charter' supplementary licence in order to apply it. The critical clauses seem to be becoming standard for Microsoft products, and although they can be presented as helpful/necessary for updates, they could also be used for DRM purposes, and provide cover for more widespread snooping.
John Lettice, 28 Aug 2002

MS yanks free Web TTFs

Font abusers have spoiled a good thing and caused Microsoft to end free downloads of their TrueType fonts for the Web, the company says.
Thomas C Greene, 28 Aug 2002

How to defang Win2k SP3's auto updating

Last week we told you how to install Windows 2000 Service Pack 3 without having to agree to Microsoft's all-new 'we can steal your stuff but we're not going to, honest' supplementary licence. We accepted at the time, of course, that the exercise was essentially frivolous, in that you'd probably be in breach of your licence agreement anyway if you circumvented the new Ts & Cs, and because just circumventing it wouldn't do anything to block the activities you objected to.
John Lettice, 28 Aug 2002

Why computer fonts are so valuable

LettersRecently I posted an article lamenting MS' sudden withdrawal of its previously free TrueType fonts for the Web, and complaining that this leaves *nix users in a lurch for truly handsome fonts to use in X.
Thomas C Greene, 28 Aug 2002

02 touts games arcade for mobile phones

02, the mobile phone network, launches the UK's first commercial Java games service for phones on Sunday (Sept 1).
John Leyden, 28 Aug 2002

PGP is back!

Phil Zimmermann's PGP is back in the hands of an independent company, after Network Associates agreed to sell the technology it mothballed back in March to a start-up specially created to market PGP.
Andrew Orlowski, 28 Aug 2002

Popular MS download has mysterious vuln

A certain remote root vulnerability in a Microsoft application called File Transfer Manager (FTM), a gimmick for developers, beta testers and volume license addicts (i.e., most of their corporate customers) alike, is not serious and there's almost no chance that some wily blackhat has used it against you.
Thomas C Greene, 28 Aug 2002

The Stuckist Net – what is your post-Palladium future?

"Your paintings are stuck, you are stuck! Stuck! Stuck! Stuck!" - Tracey Emin [to Billy Childish].
Andrew Orlowski, 28 Aug 2002

Exemptions exempted in Europe's DMCA

The European equivalent DMCA is a done deal, but the implementation of opt-outs could make all the difference in each EU member state. And the United Kingdom is missing out.
Andrew Orlowski, 28 Aug 2002

Media giants demand ISPs block Web sites

They've sued Napster and Scour into submission; realizing that this is expensive, they've bought numerous Congressional lapdogs to force the DoJ to become their personal 'Copyright 911' so that challenges to their production and distribution monopoly can be hounded down and eliminated at the taxpayer's expense rather than their own; they've lobbied Congress to impose DRM controls on virtually all media and virtually all devices, including your computer; and now, for a final assault on human dignity, the Recording Industry Ass. of America has sued for the right to determine which Web sites you and I will be permitted to visit.
Thomas C Greene, 28 Aug 2002

Sun Solaris pants on fire – official

Almost three months ago those nice people at Sun offered a free DVD of Solaris for Intel or Sparc. But as the weeks rolled by and silence (apart from spam from Sun) reigned, descriptive phrases involving words like "duplicitous", "bastards", "mouth" and "trousers" increasingly sprang to the lips of that fine collection of freeloaders which constitutes The Register's readership.
John Lettice, 28 Aug 2002
cable

EU to force ISPs and telcos to retain data for one year

European Union proposals on data retention would compel telecom firms to keep customer email logs, details of internet usage and phone call records for at least a year.
John Leyden, 28 Aug 2002

Starbuck's sells free WiFi access

If they can sell burnt, ruined coffee at premium prices, why not wireless Web access one could have for free? So goes the reasoning behind Starbucks' decision to offer WiFi at $30.00 a month in Portland, Oregon's Pioneer Square, where free access is already provided by grassroots outfit Personal Telco.
Thomas C Greene, 28 Aug 2002

Sony, Apple make phone dream team

Speculation that Apple is planning to launch a smartphone has been revived by John Markoff in the New York Times.
Andrew Orlowski, 28 Aug 2002

SonyEricsson cuts Linux P800 fee to zero

SonyEricsson hopes to mollify developers who've discovered that writing native C++ applications for the much-hyped P800 can carry a hefty fee. The move favors the savvy rather than savant: determined Linux developers should be able to get in for nothing.
Andrew Orlowski, 28 Aug 2002

Why the new MS licensing Ts & Cs are important

We've found Fred Langa absolutely hysterical for years, so we're pleased to see we've finally been able - however unintentionally - to repay our debt to the Great Man. We are, apparently, hysterical, yellow-tinted, inflammatory, and publish (amongst, he concedes, better stuff) embarrasingly shallow rants. We wouldn't ordinarily trouble you with the maunderings of some overpaid boat-anchor, but Fred, by getting it absolutely wrong, illustrates why it's vital that people are aware of the steady ratcheting upwards of Microsoft's (and indeed the software industry's in general) licensing terms and conditions, and why it is important to worry about them.
John Lettice, 28 Aug 2002

Intel goes CMP, only it doesn't

History is written by the winners - the last man standing. But you have to admire the power of marketing dollars - and a complicit mass media - to lend a hand.
Andrew Orlowski, 28 Aug 2002