21st > October > 2000 Archive

The Register breaking news

Privacy under attack (again) on Capitol Hill

Washington Roundup The seemingly-endless legislative session rolls along, as US President Bill Clinton again signed a Continuing Resolution (CR) Friday granting Congress yet another extension to conclude the nation's business. "Unfortunately, Congress has shown little urgency toward completing its work even though we are now three weeks into the new fiscal year and some of our most essential priorities, especially in the area of education, have yet to be addressed," the President observed. Easy for him to say; he's not running for office. Doesn't he know how busy these guys are.
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Microsoft declares war on '(inaudible)' Sh… Symbian

It's been reported more than once that Microsoft founder Bill Gates sees a certain private London-based company as Redmond's biggest threat. But we didn't realise it was that big.
The Register breaking news

The Register Windows Me tweaks and tips roundup

Tweaks, tips and go-faster for Windows Me have been coming out of the woodwork since launch. Here's a selection of what's happening.
The Register breaking news

Windows bugs Me – but a little less?

Driver compatibility and support is probably the biggest problem associated with Windows Me. In the past month several vendors have come up with drivers - for example, Creative has released Live!Ware 3.0 and drivers for users with a Sound Blaster sound card. Those with a Sound Blaster Live! Platinum 5.1, X-Gamer 5.1, MP3+ 5.1, and Digital Entertainment 5.1 do not need this, as the CD already contains the latest software.
The Register breaking news

Windows Me after a month – was it worth it?

Second looks It's around a month since Windows Me was released, and since my first look at the issues around getting it installed and running smoothly. A lot of people have contacted me with feedback, and I've also been able to talk to Microsoft about bugs, niggles and problems with third party software. Some of these have been fixed officially, some 'unofficially,' and the reasons why others haven't been fixed, and won't be, have at least been clarified.