25th > May > 2000 Archive

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Judge Jackson tames the Beast

MS on Trial It was an interesting day in court. Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson started things off by refusing to hear Microsoft arguments to dismiss the government's case, but headed swiftly into a surprising discussion of the merits of breaking the company into three divisions rather than two as proposed by the US Department of Justice (DoJ).
Thomas C Greene, 25 May 2000
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OK, but who gets to keep Flight Simulator?

MS on Trial "[A]ll these separate entities are parts of an organism, members of a single great business. Tear them apart and who knows what will become of them?"
Annie Kermath, 25 May 2000
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What the Hell is… Intel Online?

Mike Aymar, president of Intel Online Services, gave Internet World 2000's first keynote and a beauty it was. While we were all wondering exactly what the "Internet application hosting subsidiary of Intel" was going to do, he seemed more occupied with regurgitating the same old Internet future guff.
Kieren McCarthy, 25 May 2000
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South African man shoots PC

South Africa is a very dangerous place to live if you are a computer.
Linda Harrison, 25 May 2000
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IO, IO, it's off to Zion we go

A slide seen on an Intel roadmap earlier this week has spelled out its plans for input-output (IO) processors until the end of next year.
Mike Magee, 25 May 2000
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The Beast whinges

MS on Trial When Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson returned from lunch on Wednesday, he blew Microsoft's mind. The Beast had been busy arguing that it needed a good six months more to mount a proper, lingering defence.
Thomas C Greene, 25 May 2000
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ATI says expect Q3 loss

ATI yesterday said it expects to make a loss for its third fiscal quarter, due to end next week on 31 May.
Tony Smith, 25 May 2000
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Intel: Who exactly is running the show?

Opinion Headless chickens are all very well if you're talking about one chicken that has unfortunately had its head chopped off and made into a pie. If you're talking about a multinational, multibillion dollar corporation employing more than 70,000 people, having no one in control is a tad more significant.
Andrew Thomas, 25 May 2000
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Ace-quote.com sold for cash

Ace-quote.com, the only Welsh dotcom we've heard of, has sold itself to German Company DCI for DM85 million in cash.
Drew Cullen, 25 May 2000
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Chipzilla chops Xeon pricing in half

With today's launch of Cashcades, the Xeon with 1MB or 2MB of on-die L2 cache, Intel has slashed prices for its high-end server/ workstation processors.
Andrew Thomas, 25 May 2000
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MS Love Bug patch catches flak

Microsoft's Love Bug patch for Outlook has already been criticised for being too drastic a solution, but now it's coming under fire from Gartner for both this and for the complexity involved in deploying it. After years of being abused for taking a cavalier attitude to security, now Microsoft is taking flak for getting the fix wrong.
John Lettice, 25 May 2000
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VA Linux revenue grows over 700 per cent

Linux hardware specialist VA Linux Systems saw revenues rise 705 per cent during its third quarter, which ended 28 April. The snag: the company's loss grew too - by 506 per cent.
Tony Smith, 25 May 2000
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The three flavours of Intel's Willamette chip

The roadmap which has provided us with so much interest this week, is also interesting about Willamette and the way the Pentium III CuMine platform will gradually be displaced by the next rev of IA-32 architecture.
Mike Magee, 25 May 2000
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Harvard dropout Gates achieves double doctordom

Bill Gates has yet to complete his undergraduate work at Harvard, but he'll collect his second doctorate next month - this time in humanities from the private Rikkyo University in Tokyo. A representative of the university said that Gates had "contributed to today's computer science technology" and added that he had "given much to improve education through his private funds".
Graham Lea, 25 May 2000