18th > May > 2000 Archive

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OS bug survey shows Linux, Win NT in dead heat

A statistical survey of operating system vulnerabilities from SecurityFocus shows that the much-maligned Windows-NT is only marginally buggier than the beloved and putatively superior Linux.
Thomas C Greene, 18 May 2000
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Bill Clinton associates Love Bug with terrorism

Commander-in-Chief Bill Clinton fretted about cyber-security during a US Coast Guard Academy commencement speech which he delivered in Connecticut today.
Thomas C Greene, 18 May 2000
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Love Bug suspects can't be charged

The Philippine Department of Justice has ruled that a law invoked against suspects in the Love Bug e-mail worm case can't be stretched to apply to hacking, the Associated Press reports.
Thomas C Greene, 18 May 2000
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Linux goes Big Iron

IBM has announced the availability of Linux running natively on its S/390 mainframes, although general availability won't be until the autumn. SuSE and TurboLinux are acting as distributors and first call of support for potential users.
Annie Kermath, 18 May 2000
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L0pht uncovers Office 2000 ActiveX security hole

An ActiveX control in Micro$oft Office 2000 named "Office UA Control" used to script demonstrations for Office 2000 Help can be used to script almost any action that a user could perform from the keyboard, an advisory from L0pht Heavy Industries says.
Thomas C Greene, 18 May 2000
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Don't delay MS breakup, government tells judge

MS on Trial As expected the US government has urged the judge to toss Microsoft's proposed remedies out, but it is also pushing hard to have the company strung up sooner, rather than later. In a 70 page filing to the court yesterday the DoJ and states described Microsoft's request for a delay of up to six months as "a transparent effort to delay the determination and implementation of a remedy for its illegal acts as long as possible." Microsoft's recent efforts have indeed looked just a teensie bit transparent. The company wants to produce more witnesses to argue that the government's proposed remedies are extreme, wrong-headed and likely to destroy Microsoft, innovation, the US economy and the universe, not necessarily in that order. Microsoft also wants until December to carry on wriggling, if Judge Jackson does agree with the government and decides to go for a breakup. In its filing the government points out that Microsoft's violations have already been established, and that: "Liability is not in doubt, and relief should be as prompt as possible." Microsoft's argument of course is over the nature of the relief, and whether the sentence fits the crime (which it still denies, of course). One slightly puzzling aspect of the government filing, however, is that it argues that Microsoft should have been prepared for the breakup proposal, rather than coming over all shocked and stunned, because it "has known for several months about plaintiffs' interest in structural relief." But that kind of depends on how you count, and what you count, doesn't it? Breakup proposals were certainly being tossed around in the government camp months ago, but it's not clear that these ever reached the table during the aborted negotiation talks. As these were about to hit the buffers, the word was that the government was prepared not to go for a breakup in order to achieve a settlement. If the hawks from the states reintroduced this to the talks, they did so on 31st March, the day before it all fell apart. The way we count that, it's a month and bit, not several. Alternatively, further back down the line there were other breakup proposals put to Microsoft - be interesting to see what was in them. ®
John Lettice, 18 May 2000
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Net privacy a tangled skein – FTC committee

A US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) committee charged with making broad Net privacy recommendations can't seem to step forward with any solid conclusions on the issues.
Thomas C Greene, 18 May 2000
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Dobedo.com ruled offensive by watchdog

Once a month the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) produces a report on the complaints it has dealt with and once a month we get to learn about the dodgy tricks that IT companies have used to sell more boxes.
Kieren McCarthy, 18 May 2000
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SGI to shower shareholders with MIPS stock

Troubled SGI is to rid itself of its remaining shares in MIPS, the processor company it founded and spun off some years back, in a move not unlike 3Com's upcoming Palm Computer stock giveaway.
Tony Smith, 18 May 2000
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ICO emerges from Chapter 11…

Satellite networking company ICO Global Communications - or New ICO, as we're now supposed to call it - has thrown aside its Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection.
Tony Smith, 18 May 2000
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Sun hits back at Unix vendors' FUD

The propaganda war waged by HP, IBM and Compaq against Sun has caused a senior executive at McNealy's firm to rebut claims that it is misleading customers.
Mike Magee, 18 May 2000
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FSA hit squad probes for dodgy financial sites

The FSA is to probe more than 50 Web sites targeting UK users following an undercover "surf day" into Internet scams.
Linda Harrison, 18 May 2000
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Handspring files for cautious IPO

Palm clone maker Handspring disclosed details of its cautiously optimistic IPO this week. It will offer ten million shares - eight per cent of the company - priced between $19 and $22, which is just under what Palm itself is currently trading at (around $26) following the April collapse of hi-tech stocks.
Tony Smith, 18 May 2000
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MS claims breakup will kill next-generation Windows project

MS on Trial In an extraordinary covert filing by Microsoft in the antitrust case, the company claims that it would be too risky to develop Next Generation Windows Services if Microsoft is split into two companies.
Graham Lea, 18 May 2000
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Dell plans for Red Hat Linux Itanium boxes get disappeared

Yesterday Dell announced, and then swiftly unannounced, that it would be in the first wave of companies delivering servers and workstations based on Itanium. It didn't exactly say that these would run Red Hat Linux, but given the context (a Red Hat press release) that was kind of implied.
John Lettice, 18 May 2000
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Fujitsu Siemens: ‘Everyone’ wants Win2k for IA-64

Fujitsu Siemens yesterday rebranded its server products in a bid to establish a global presence. Intel-based products will now carry the Primergy label, while the company's Unix offerings will be named Primepower. The thinking being that Fujitsu will use the brand in APAC, Amdahl in the US, and Fujitsu Siemens in Europe.
Andrew Thomas, 18 May 2000
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New Rambus validation service from Kingston

With Intel's blessing, Kingston Technology has set up a new independent testing lab, Advanced Validation Laboratories (AVL) to help DRAM manufacturers, PC OEMs, motherboard manufacturers, system integrators, and module manufacturers bring their products to market faster.
Andrew Thomas, 18 May 2000