11th > February > 2000 Archive

The Register breaking news

Court seizes home computers in Northwest Airlines labour dispute

Americans don't call it "North-worst Airlines" for nothing. In addition to serving up what civilised travellers agree is the least competent and most churlish air service in North America, the company recently sought and gained a temporary restraining order against two Webmasters it accuses of organising a sick-out. Flight attendants Kevin Griffin and Ted Reeve both maintained Web sites during contract negotiations between Northwest and the Teamsters Local 2000 late last year. Northwest alleges that Reeve and Griffin incited a sick-out via their BBS. At the company's bidding, Minnesota district court issued a temporary restraining order against Reeve and Griffin on 5 January. The order forbade them from "approving of" or "permitting" a sick-out, queerly assuming that they might have the power to prevent one. For a kicker, the court ordered copies made of both men's personal, home computer hard drives, raising important questions about how far corporate baby-sitting may reasonably extend into our private lives. According to Ralph Nader watchdog group Public Citizen, the court issued the temporary restraining order without notifying the men, effectively denying them representation at the hearing where these decisions were made. Public Citizen is seeking to have the order vacated, and has filed a motion with the Eighth Circuit Federal Appellate Court on behalf of Griffin and Reeve. It all looks a bit dodgy to us. According to Northwest's own records, neither man participated in the sick-out for which they are being blamed, and which occurred in late December. According to Public Citizen's filing, the complaint alleged that the defendants "had incited members of the union to engage in a sick-out, that beginning on December 21 there had been a sharp increase in the number of flight attendants calling in sick, out of proportion to statistics from prior years, and that as a result Northwest had been forced to cancel many flights." Public Citizen Litigation Group lawyer Paul Levy offers another explanation. "It was not a typical New Year," Levy told The Register. "A number of flight attendants may have called in sick due to Y2K concerns, or simply because the Millennium bash was such a special occasion." The group is accusing the court of serious miscarriages of justice: exerting prior restraint on speech against the men, and improperly denying them a hearing on the matter of the temporary restraining order. "There are circumstances where a hearing would not be required, but you always have to explain why," Levy says. In this case, no explanation, indeed, no notice whatever, was given, the group maintains. Levy seems fairly optimistic about the prospects of reversing on appeal. Northwest is flooding the court with "lots of paper," he observes. A strategy "typical of a big firm representing a wealthy corporation," especially when it has less than a compelling case. But Levy is neither overconfident nor overly worried: "they recognise that they can't prove that Griffin and Reeve were involved in the sick out," he says. Meaning that if they are shot down on appeal, Northwest doesn't really want to try the case on its merits. The appellate court has given Northwest's legal dream-team until Monday to reply to Public Citizen's filing. Apparently, the court is not interested in big corporate delay tactics likely to bury it in "lots of paper". A positive sign, we think. The Register has always had faith in the appeals process. We hope it's not been misplaced. ®
The Register breaking news

Via sets date for Joshua Celeron rival

Via's Joshua chip is to be formally unveiled on 22nd February, according to company sources. The low-cost chip is aimed at Intel's Celeron, uses Socket 370, and will initially run at speeds of 433MHz and 466MHz. Clock speeds of 500MHz and above are due later this year. With the launch of the chip Via will have the opportunity to prove that the low-cost Intel cloning market isn't automatically a bone-yard. Joshua is based on Cyrix's Cayenne core, Via having bought Cyrix from NatSemi last year. Cyrix had been relatively unsuccessful in making inroads into the market, as had Centaur, which Via also bought last year. It remains to be seen whether Via has sufficient extra advantages to be able to succeed where Cyrix and Centaur failed, but greater integration opportunities and the rise of the appliance-like PC may help. Joshua is being fabbed at 0.18 micron by NatSemi. ®
The Register breaking news

FBI refuses to open source for Linux DDOS detector

The FBI has released updated Distributed Denial of Service detection tools for Linux and Solaris, and is urging people to use them - but the Feds are declining to make the source available. This is obviously a bit of a no-no for the open source audience you'd expect for Linux tools, and the stance looks even odder when you learn that the FBI's developer, Dave Dittrich of the University of Washington, has released his own software, with source. The FBI is making the tools, designed to detect TRINOO and Tribal Flood Network (TFN) attacks, available via the National Infrastructure Protection Center (NIPC). It does however seem to be refusing to release source as a matter of policy. Contacted by a Register reader the NIPC responded (corporately, apparently, as no spokesperson name was attached): "The NIPC has determined that it is important not to release the source code publicly. We do, however, have measures in place to help ensure that the executable on our website is not compromised. Thank you for contacting us." Our informant had pointed out that: "Many internet sites will *not* install binaries provided by the US government, and specifically the FBI, lacking source. I would strongly recommend that you provide source for these tools, preferably under an OSI compliant license (GPL, BSD, MozPL, etc.), at the very least simply publishing source whether or not you allow modifications of it, though copyright in government works is not, AFAIK, applicable in this case." This seems to be a mindset too far for the NIPC. But never mind, although the FBI version isn't likely to be that popular, Dittrich's version comes with source. We're told that the FBI version runs on the target systems and searches files for traces of the DDOS tools, whereas version with source attempts to remotely identify the DDOS tools by eliciting certain responses to network probes. According to our informant (thanks, reader): "This method is much less reliable as it typically relies on the tools having the original passwords. However, running programs on the target systems is much harder to automate." So there you go. Pays your money (not exactly), takes your choice. ® Your DDOS downloads tonight: FBI version Dittrich implementation
The Register breaking news

IBM thumps the Win2k tub, but supports everything

Whatever happened to the OS wars? Now thumping the Win2k tub, IBM says it is second only to Microsoft in spending money on Windows 2000, and that it will itself be Microsoft's biggest customer for it, with 300,000 seats. In a briefing on IBM's software strategy, IBM has made it clear how it expects to profit from Windows 2000: "The middleware opportunity is four times the OS opportunity". For its part, IBM is happy to support NT/Windows 2000, OS/400, AIX, OS/390, OS/2, Solaris, Linux and HP-UX with its middleware, so here's one company that is not exactly betting the farm on W2000, however much it intends to shout around the Win2k launch time. So far as market growth is concerned, IBM's figures are that the Windows hardware, software and services market will grow from $75 billion in 1999 to $145 billion in 2001, and that "IBM can substantially benefit from the growth in this market". IBM also expects the worldwide hardware server market to increase to $107 billion in 2003 (from $70 billion in 1998), with Windows servers more than doubling their share, but only to about 30 per cent of the market by 2003. At the core of IBM's strategy is the knowledge that 90 per cent of Fortune 1000 companies use three or more operating systems, hence the 10,000 software engineers IBM has working on multiplatform solutions. IBM expects 60 percent of its customers to use Windows 2000 for front-end e-business, so wants to be sure that it "can substantially benefit from the growth in this market". Consequently it says it has 6,000 people specialising in Windows, with 150 at its Kirkland, Washington IBM Center for Microsoft Technology. IBM also says it has developed more software products on NT and Windows 2000 than any other vendor. We asked whether IBM would support NDS as an alternative to Active Directory, and were told that it would, and that many customers may stay with NDS. This tallied with the criteria that IBM suggests should be considered when selecting a Microsoft services vendor, which include: "Do they know anything besides Microsoft?" and "Don't give me a bunch of paper MCSEs with no real experience". Windows 2000 scalability is on offer too: it needs not just the right hardware, software and middleware, but also help from IBM Global Services. IBM seems to have been borrowing some slogans. Ray Noorda will be pleased to know that IBM sees the situation as being "Co-opetition at its best". There was also a certain familiar ring about "Where are you today? Where do you want to be?" But perhaps the most mysterious pronouncement was that "Windows 2000 is considerably different from NT4: the same rules no longer apply." ®
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PlayStation-on-Mac developer gets sales ban lifted

Connectix has been granted the right to resume shipments of its Mac-based PlayStation emulator, Virtual Game Station (VGS), more than a year after Sony launched its copyright and intellectual property infringement case against the developer. The judgement, made yesterday by the US Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals also paves the way for the release for the Windows version of the emulator, which was in development throughout 1999. The Appeals Court ruling reverses a preliminary injunction granted to Sony last April. That decision was centred on the District Court's acceptance of Sony's claim that Connectix used copies of the PlayStation BIOS in its VGS development programme. Yesterday's judgement, however, claimed that Connectix engineers, having actually gone out and bought a PlayStation, had certain rights to access the BIOS under fair use law, and that since the final version of VGS doesn't contain the PlayStation BIOS, VGS doesn't infringe Sony's copyrights. You'll note that the ruling doesn't specifically legitimise what Connectix did. It simply states that the company's fair use of the PlayStation BIOS in the development of a non-infringing version of VGS. "Other intermediate copies of the Sony BIOS made by Connectix, if they infringed Sony's copyright, do not justify injunctive relief," says the ruling (our italics). In other words, the reversal was granted on the basis that Sony should not have been granted the preliminary injunction, not that Connectix's use of the PlayStation BIOS isn't an infringement of Sony's intellectual property. It's this use of the BIOS in the VGS development process that differentiates Sony vs. Connectix from the parallel copyright infringement case, Sony vs. Bleem!. Bleem!'s PlayStation-on-a-PC was hit by an identical suit from Sony, but as a purely reverse-engineered product (as opposed to Connectix's sort-of-reverse-engineered software) Sony was unable to gain a ban on sales of Bleem!'s software. Those "intermediate copies" will surely form the basis of Sony's case against Connectix when it comes to trial, and while yesterday's judgement simply allows the developer to begin selling VGS again, it does strengthen its defence against Sony. It's also worth noting, that the Appeals Court isn't too happy with Sony, practically accusing the Japanese giant of using copyright law to maintain its absolute control of PlayStation market. That should please Bleem!, which has already gained the right to countersue Sony for attempting to compete unfairly through its allegedly hostile legal action. ®
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Austrian Freedom Party ‘declares war on English speakers’

The Austrian Freedom Party appear to have begun their charm offensive to win over world opinion. With the accent on offensive. Now junior members of the Austrian Government, those much maligned people are not anti-everything and anti-everybody. Just anti-most things and most people, as the English-language section on "their" Web site shows. Actually, it's a spoof, as many German and Austrian readers have pointed out. But it kind of sums up our feelings about The AFP (and no, we don't dislike Austrians. Just Nazis). So here goes. Here, for posterity, is the message in full: "Welcome to the Austrian Freedom Party For our non german (sic) speaking guests we have a message in Engish(sic): Learn German or fuck off! Visit our German Hompage (sic) And here, if you must, is the real AFP web site. ®
The Register breaking news

LateRooms takes a pop at Lastminute

An e-commerce up-start start-up claims to have stolen a lead over the darling of British e-business, Lastminute.com. LateRooms.com says its has leapfrogged Lastminute.com by signing up 1500 hotels to the site, making it the largest database of its kind on the Web. Sources also claim that LateRooms.com is generating even more booking enquiries than LastMinute.com, despite only being launched in November last year. "Unlike the clutch of other loss-making Web outfits scrambling for market share, the site has begun turning a profit after only four months online," boasts LateRooms.com. Self-financing LateRooms.com is part of the Internet incubator Start.co.uk -- an online holding company for web-based start-ups. Start.co.uk has a paper value estimated at around £200 million, the company said. ® Related Stories The wit and wisdom of Martha Lane Fox Float announced for Lastminute.com Flotation ahoy for Lastminute.com
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Valentine's Day debut for Telewest free Net calls service

Cable operator Telewest is to start offering unmetered access to the Net on Monday. Whether the Valentine's Day launch will be the beginning of a love affair between British Net users and Telewest remains to be seen. All in, it will cost users £29 a month to get unmetered 24/7 access to the Net. But that figure includes £9 phone line rental a month (which is cheaper than BT). Users must also agree to spend at least £10 of voice calls a month as well. The only other cost is £10 a month subscription to SurfUnlimited -- the unmetered Net access package from Telewest. The ISP is Cable Internet. "We think it will be phenomenal," said a spokesman for the company. "February 14th 2000 will be a landmark date for Internet users in the UK." Telewest also said it would launch its broadband service at the end of March, although details about the service have yet to be released. ® Related Story Telewest to offer unlimited Net access
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Dell's power to drive profits slows to crawl

Dell's recent profit growth warning was fleshed out yesterday when the doyen of direct PC sales announced a tiny rise in net income and a large -- but not up to par -- growth in revenue for its fourth quarter, ended 28 January. The quarter's profits total a mere $436 million (16 cents a share), up just three per cent on the $425 million (15 cents a share) Dell recorded for the same period last year, and just under six-and-a-half per cent of the $6.8 billion the company made in sales. That figure represents an increase of 31 per cent in Dell's revenue when compared to last year's Q4, down on the 50 per cent and up revenue growth the company has been seeing for the last five years or so. Dell blamed the downturn on the same Y2k-inspired dip in sales that hit a number of PC vendors over the last months of 1999. It also singled out Intel, blaming the chip vendor's inability to supply sufficient Pentium III CPUs for a further slowdown in sales. Chairman Michael Dell was quick to point out the prospect of better times ahead, but the results suggest that he needs to do some fundamental repair work to the company he founded. A 31 per cent increase in revenue isn't exactly a sign of failure: at that level of growth, sales may be slowing but they're hardly collapsing or, worse, tailing off. But when you're profits are only up three per cent, that's more worrying, since it implies either margins are way down or Dell really needs to take a look at cutting costs. Margins are down some, thanks to said product shortages, increases in memory costs and falling PC prices, but surely not enough to see Dell keeping so small a proportion of the money it receives from a sale? And the situation isn't likely to improve in the near future, with flat earnings growth next quarter. Still Dell's a bright lad, and is clearly looking increasingly toward the high-margin server market and further diversification into the Web services business to pump up his company's profitability. The company will soon launch a Web hosting service for SMEs, ultimately expanding it to take in corporates too. And Dell expects a big server spending spree through the coming year, as company expand their Internet-oriented hardware: "I think we are at the beginning of a massive buildout of storage and servers... to provide companies with new Internet capabilities. "Probably five per cent of what is necessary five years out is installed today and what's installed today will have to be replaced." Sales of servers and enterprise storage products were up 55 per cent during the quarter, so the spree is clearly beginning already. However, the company warned that increased spending due to the hardware demands of Windows 2000 is very unlikely to make much on an impact before the second half of the year. ®
The Register breaking news

European PC market driven by Net

The rush to get online is fuelling PC demand in Europe, with 1999 seeing an 18 per cent increase in sales over 1998. Figures from research analysts Dataquest, show 29.9 million PCs were sold in Europe last year, with the home PC market growing by 32 per cent year-on-year. In the Western European home PC market, 8.5 million units were shipped in 1999. Howard Seabrook, vice president and director for Dataquest's Computer Systems and Peripherals programs, says the picture of the typical European PC user is changing. "The image of the lone gamer, isolated and hidden away in his bedroom has changed, and we see expansive, Internet-based computing with everyone wanting to be connected." Dell had the highest sales growth rate across Europe, shifting more than 2.6 million PCs, pushing it to the number three slot in the PC vendor Top 10 with 8.7 per cent of the market. The recently formed Fujitsu Siemens is Europe's number two PC vendor, thanks in the main to Siemens' substantial German fan base. According to Dataquest, combined sales of Fujitsu and Siemens PCs across Europe last year stood at 3.5 million, which equates to a market share of 11.5 per cent. Of course, the leader of the pack is still Compaq, which shipped 4.7 million PC last year, netting it 15.6 per cent share of the market. IBM and Hewlett Packard were third and fourth respectively. HP saw its market share rise by an impressive 28 per cent to 6.3 per cent, thanks to shipments totalling 1.9 million in 1999. Big Blue shifted 2.3 million units, an increase of 11.1 per cent, giving it 7.8 per cent of the market. Germany remains the major force in the European PC market. In 1999, Germans bought 21.6 per cent more PCs than last year, totalling 6.6 million machines. The UK was the second biggest PC market in 1999, with shipments of 5.5 million units, up 25.2 per cent from 1998. In France, which was number three, 4.4 million units were shipped, which represents an increase of 26.7 per cent. ® Related Stories PC sales up 23 per cent last year despite Y2K Dell eats into Compaq's European sales Compaq and Dell play cat and mouse with PC sales
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AOL demands flat fees for Germany

After a dry run in Britain, AOL Europe is taking its political lobbying skills to Germany. The world's biggest ISP wants the German government and public telco Deutsche Telekom to reduce Internet call charges by up to 50 per cent. This would stimulate the German economy by 0.5 per cent and create up to 400,000 jobs, AOL claims. It bases the forecasts on a (self-commissioned) survey on the impacts of flat-fee charges on the country. For once this is not Anglo-Saxon preaching: AOL Europe's chief executive Andreas Schmidt is German, even if he swallows the American capitalist message hook, line and sinker. "The Internet can bestow a second miracle on Germany and in the short term lead to a radical reduction in unemployment," he told Reuters. "The Internet is the job machine of the future." German off-peak connection prices are the second highest in nine major Europe markets, the AOL report found. The company calls on regulators to force Deutsche Telecom to reduce its interconnect charges. It has room to introduce a "40-mark flat-rate fee while boosting average income 30 per cent", AOL Europe spokesman Frank Sarfeld told Reuters. "We're not asking Deutsche Telekom to give away the flat rate for free. They could even make money," he said. Lower charges would mean hugely expanded call usage, according to AOL, which cites its experience in the US, where usage trebled, after it introduced flat fees. Turn that meter off AOL Europe last year threw its weight behind CUT, the UK group which lobbies for unmetered telephone charges. Already in the UK, ISPs are trialling flat rate and free services -- and most of are getting swamped by the huge demand. It is just a matter of time when -- not if -- a monster ISP like AOL goes wholly down the unmetered route (currently it's fee-paying operation offers 1p per minute service in the UK). An unmetered UK telephone networks suits AOL very well. Its fee-based business model is designed for such an environment, while free ISPs living off metered phone charges (such as Freeserve) are a huge irritation, and impediment, to making money. In Germany, Europe's richest and most populous market, there is even more to play for: AOL Europe, a joint venture between AOL and Bertelsmann, has 1.6 million users in Germany, but it ranks far behind Deutsche Telekom-owned T-Online, Europe's biggest indigenous ISP, with more than 3 million users. However, it will take some time for AOL's call for unmetered calls in Germany to take wing: Deutsche Telekom is currently preparing a third wave of privatisation, and the German government is -- so Reuters says -- unlikely to do anything to undermine confidence in advance of the share offering. ®
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Adobe to bring PDF to Palm PDAs

Adobe this week announced that it will port its Acrobat technology -- the software behind its Portable Document Format (PDF) -- over to the PalmOS. Neither Adobe nor Palm Computing said when PDF would be integrated into the PDA-oriented operating system, but with the launch of a major upgrade to the PalmOS, version 3.5, planned for later this month when Palm ships its first colour PDA, the Palm IIIc -- we would surprised if the two technologies' arrival doesn't coincide. Fo course, Palm PDA screens aren't really designed to show the "tens of millions of PDF files already available worldwide" (as Palm puts it) -- basically, they're too small. Clearly the motivation here is Palm's strategy to expand its software at a platform rather than as the basis for one (its own) line of electronic organisers. Essentially, the move allows Palm to flog the PalmOS to third-parties keen to develop e-book systems. And Palm's goal is to shift its revenue focus away from hardware and toward licensing fees. Meanwhile, PalmOS 3.5 went Golden Master this week -- essentially wrapping up development work on the new operating system in preparation for its final release. ® Related Stories Colour Palm IIIc to ship 20 February -- Best Buy Samsung designs Palm-style colour ARM-based Linux MP3 PDA
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AMD jumps gun in MHz wars

AMD has launched its 850MHz chip, the fastest Athlon to date, a whopping three days ahead of schedule. Originally slated for a Valentine's Day debut, 850MHz -powered PCs are on sale from IBM, Compaq and Gateway today in the US. It will take a little longer for delivery - Compaq is quoting upwards of 20 days overnight for its 850MhHz offering, the same as for the 800MHz, one webmaster informs us. Not so bad, when you consider the PC vendor is quoting 45 days overnight for delivery of Intel PIII 800s. In OEM quantities (of 1,000), the Athlon 850MHz costs $849. ® Related stories System builders back Athlon 850 AMD to massacre Intel on St Valentine's Day
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Buy books with your mobile phone

Gadget-loving bookworms can soon order their favourite tomes using their do-WAP enabled mobile phones. The nation's favourite newsagent, WHSmith, said it expects to launch its Wireless Application Protocol (WAP) book retailing service by the end of March. The company is currently in discussions with all the major network providers, including Orange, Vodafone and BT Cellnet, to support the wireless service. Kate Kennedy, MD of WHSmith Online, said: "No other UK bookseller, online or off, can match our ability to allow customers to shop via the Internet, mobile technology, digital TV or on the High Street. "We see the wireless world as a key element to fulfilling our ecommerce potential," she said. WHSmith's do-WAP a diddy diddy do-WAP move into mobile-commerce is part of its plan to corner 30 per cent of the British online book market within the next three years, the company said. It is estimated that within five years wireless devices could account for 20 per cent of the total ecommerce market. The British m-commerce market is expected to be worth £2 billion by 2003. ® See also: WH Smith to launch Web portal tomorrow
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Second-generation DDoS tools now easily detected

The merry prankster(s) who recently launched widespread distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks against such paragons of e-commercial success as Yahoo and E-Trade have bequeathed us one valuable legacy: they raised awareness of a threat which the security community, toiling in obscurity, had failed to make sufficiently clear. The Register got the message, however, and nearly two weeks ago we warned all of you that DDoS attacks were a greater threat than previously imagined. We noted that the FBI's National Infrastructure Protection Center (NIPC), a notoriously tight-lipped organization, had mused aloud that earlier DoS exploits indicated "preparation for widespread denial of service attacks." It seems they were right. Fancy that. Now, improved DDoS weapons have been released. These are Stacheldraht (German for "barbed wire") and an updated version of Tribal Flood Network (TFN) appropriately named TFN2K. The security community, still toiling in obscurity, has graciously developed tools to detect both. The Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT) offers a detailed description of both weapons. Not that you'll read it. However, for all the good it will do, Stacheldraht information can be found on the CERT site here; and TFN2K information can be found on the same site here. Even better, the NIPC has developed tools to detect either weapon on your system. Not that you'll download them, but for what it's worth, the files are available from the NIPC Web site here. ®
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Man Utd in £30m Vodafone deal

Mobile telco, Vodaphone, has confirmed it is to spend £30 million over the next four years sponsoring Manchester United. The deal is believed to be the biggest yet in British football. Last month yodelling portal, Yahoo! distanced itself from speculation that it was set to splash out £40 million to sponsor the shirts of Man Utd. Yahoo! was later linked with a sponsorship deal with the Prost F1 motor racing team. ® See also: Yahoo! and Man Utd linked in £40m deal
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UK PM Webcasts to the nation

The British Prime Minister has sidestepped traditional media and used the Net to broadcast to the nation. The party political Webcast by Tony Blair earlier today was part of a £55,000 refit of the Government Web site, number-10.gov.uk. What's more, the PM has vowed to talk to his flock every Friday using it as a platform to connect directly to his people. Today he talked about education. Government spinpersons denied that this New Media triumph could smudge the boundaries between Government policy and party politics. ® See also: The Blair Net Project
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UK gov't reveals Big Brother bill

Yesterday the UK Government published details of its plans to allow law enforcement agencies to access email correspondence. Now, for the first time, UK police will be able to lawfully read your emails and listen in on your mobile phone conversations. The Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill is being positioned by Government spin doctors as nothing more than a move to treat new communications techniques the same way as conventional telephony, but is already attracting criticism. Pagers and the use of the Internet will also be covered by the proposed legislation which is expected to come into force later this year. According to the Financial Times, the Government wants it on the statute books before the Human Rights Act comes into being in October. Critics of the surveillance bill are concerned that giving officials the power to demand access to encryption keys will open the door to a range of privacy abuse issues. While the attempt to crack down on the use of the Net as a way of distributing offensive and illegal material (be it from racist organisations or paedophile rings) will be supported by most people, there is a concern that the proposed legislation will be used as a blunt instrument. Failure to hand over a text-only version of a suspected email or give the police access to the encryption key you are using could result in a two year prison sentence. Another area of concern is that the police will be able to grant their own warrants to use the proposed Act's powers to put someone under surveillance. ®
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Three Intel mobos scrapped because of chipset probs

Documents Intel has sent its system manufacturers are outlining its plans for the phasing in of the flip chip technology and the departure of the Slot One configuration (SECC2). According to the documents, Intel will offer Slot One versions of its Coppermine processors within 30 days of offering equivalent processors in the FC-PGA (flip chip configuration). It will do so until the end of this year. The 1GHz frequency is likely to be the last in the Coppermine series. Intel has acknowledged it may not be able to provide wide availability of Slot One, however. Intel is also scrapping three server motherboards based on the i820 and i840 chipsets, according to the inside documents, which were supposed to launch in the next couple of weeks. These, apparently, are called Pine, Hemlock and Willow and are server motherboards. Lancewood may be re-worked to support Coppermine processors. The memory translators for these chipsets do not work as well as Intel wanted. The chip giant could have redesigned the mobos, but instead has decided to recall the whole caboodle. And, to avoid the problem of compatibility, Intel may even produce its own version of a slot one convertor. Meanwhile, word comes of the successor to the Willamette and Foster families, with two codenames, Tualatin and Gallatin coming out of the Intel skunkworks. Willamette may also launch "this fall" at 1.4GHz. ®
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LinuxOne nicks Register Flame of The Week

Cheeky monkeys: LinuxOne, the controversial Linux distro, has started a "Flame of The Week".