2nd > January > 2000 Archive

The Register breaking news

Lloyds of London (twice), Met Office follow Railtrack UK in hack attack

Updated The latest site to be attacked by hackers bent on leaving their mark on the 21st century was Lloyds of London, which was hit earlier on today. The site was fixed, but then was hacked anew only a few hours later. The hackers posted the following message in their original hack: "Greets to #hackuk, #rootworm, TYRANT MY MAN, flame, h2so4, SuperSheep, solarflux, crack pyrate and every1 else" The message continued: "Another site owned by Mister-X, along side Mystique - The UK caught the net boom, but it forgot about security - We are just pointing this out". But just a few hours afterwards, the hackers made their point by bringing the site down again, this time with the message: ""OK, I have owned you once already today. You obviously didn't read my message, or are just plain stupid. - So, I will put it in simple term - SECURE YOUR SITE - X". At the time of this update (14:28 UT), the site was unavailable. At this point, you might care to look at this E Commerce Times article about insurance against hacking with underwriting obtainable from.... The UK Met Office at this page also appears to have been attacked, although the problem is now fixed. It apparently had, as a background GIF, a porn site banner ad. The attacks do highlight the fact that Web sites are still pretty flakey on the security front. For other sites that we learned have been attacked over the last few days, read below. ® 31 December 1999 Hackers have broken into the UK Railtrack site, causing the company, which looks after the infrastructure of Britain's railway system, to take the site down. The hack occurred late yesterday evening, with technicians struggling to restore normal service this morning. But the hacks seem to be turning into an epidemic. The Eidos site here, and latterly the Electronic Frontier Foundation, which is here, also appear to have suffered attacks today. The Core site was attacked by a group describing itself as the "Y2K" crew, while the same "Y2K" crew also hacked the Dea site. After the Railtrack pages were broken into, a message appeared on the site saying: "Sorry, but due to year 2000 compatability (sic) problems there will be no trains operating between 31.12.99 and 02.01.00. "Web design by Team Spl0it" When this link was clicked on, the following message appeared: "Team Spl0it have owned you railtrack. "It seems that your trains and your computers have something in common...does it not? "Greets to #HackUK, #Rootworm, Illusions Team, Domz, Trionix, d0c, h2so4, Slacker, Dred, sf, All the sheep in Wales(Beaaaaven) and all of the Railtrack directors." We attempted to contact Railtrack's UK office for more information but the phone lines were constantly engaged. Railtrack managed to get the site back on the iron road at 11.10am, UK time. The number of sites that readers have notified us have been so far hacked today suggests a concerted attack is underway.® * Sydney, Australia. In a few hours time the year 2000 hits Australia, and executives at the rapid transit system are allowing the trains to run for a couple of hours over the crucial period, but the doors of the trains will not be opened to avoid any potential Y2K problems...
The Register breaking news

Compaq AMD 7xxx Presarios to have Firewire support

This is not going to necessarily be of very good cheer to those people who have 5800 series which freeze up, as exclusively revealed here early last week, but we now have obtained further details of the 7000 Presario series which will replace the systems. Compaq had been deluged by individuals who bought Presario 5800s and encountered persistent and annoying freezes which could only be fixed by pulling the power on the machines. The problems, for many, still persist, although Compaq has got so-called SoftPaq's for machines which use the AMD chip. Here is the complete information, with prices, on the Compaq 7xxx Presario series which it will release shortly. Intel does not support the Firewire 1394 standard, and instead plumps for USB, but the Athlon machines Compaq will release do have such support. The 7360 K6-II 500Mhz/64 MB RAM/10GB HD/40X CD/8MB Video RAM with Shared Video Memory and two USB ports will cost $800. The 7470 K6-II 533Mhz/64MB RAM/20GB HD/CDRW/with 8 MB Video RAM and four shared USB ports and Quickcam will cost $1,000. The 7478 K6II- 533MHz/64 RAM/30 GB/DVD/CDRW/8 MB Shared/4 USB ports/Quickcam will cost $1,300. The 7588 with a Pentium III 550MHz chip/128 RAM/30 GB/40 X/CDRW/8 MB Shared/4 USB ports/Quickcam will cost $1,600 The 7940 with an Athlon K7 600MHz chip/128 RAM/30 GB/DVD andCDRW/16 MB VRAM/4 USB ports/Quickcam/and two Firewire 1394 ports will cost $1,800. The 7970 Athlon K7 with a 700MHz chip /128 RAM/40 GB/DVD and CDRW/16 MB RAM/4 USB ports/Quickcam/and 2 1394 ports will cost $2,100 In other news from Compaq, the company will shortly introduce a series of laptops and will change its numbering system from four digits to a new system which will use a somewhat confusing four digits, two letters and three digits, for example 1200XL106. We have heard back from Q Central in the US. The spin department there, which commented to several news wires which "followed up" our original story, said they had never heard of The Register. Considering that we managed to get a Mr Jim Boak, director of Compaq's corporate technical strategy to write to us in person when we scooped the world on the company dropping NT for Alpha last August, we find this a little surprising. Thanks to our colleagues Infoworld, ZD and Cnet for following up on our original story. ® See also New PCs emerge from Compaq glacier Frozen Presarios found in Compaq support glacier
The Register breaking news

Cap Gemini cautions against Y2K over-optimism

It will be weeks and months before IT directors and businesses can say the Y2K problem is over and done with, a senior executive at major consultancy Cap Gemini warned today. Harry Blakey, UK divisional director of Cap Gemini's Y2K unit, said that his company had expected few problems at the point when the 20th century became the 21st century. His company, like many others around the world, has had a team in place over the weekend to watch out for incipient problems. Blakey said: "It's been immensely boring, but we've been pleasantly bored. We weren't expecting huge problems at the rollover stage." However, he warned against complacency. "The clock shift in hardware is only part of the process and we'll run tests to at least the end of January and probably until the end of February." Some business processes will need monitoring until the end of this year, he added. "What we've seen so far is very, very few Y2K problems that even registered on the radar," he said. "Most are little glitches." Blakey said that the glitches it has found over the weekend have not been business critical and "peripheral to many business processes". He also said that the fear of Y2K virus problems looks, so far at least, not as big a problem as anticipated. Many large firms have shut down their email system over the new year as a precaution against problems arising. The real testing time will come when businesses start next week. Monday is a Bank Holiday in the UK, so systems, particularly applications, will be put under real test conditions the day afterwards. "When application systems are put under full load, it won't be 100 per cent," he warned. Everyone had seemed to think that the rollover period was the real test, but that was not the case. ® See also Microsoft, Gigabyte, Futurists get bugged by Y2K Lloyds of London, Met Office follow Railtrack in hack attack