28th > November > 1999 Archive

The Register breaking news

Last .25 Celeron slated for 10 January

The spate of Coppermine Pentium IIIs that Intel will intro on January 10th next will walk hand-in-hand into the daylight with last .25 micron Celeron processor ever, a 533MHz using the 66MHz bus and with a multiplier of eight. That will, most likely, be the last appearance of a .25 micron Celeron on the Intel stage, before it and other members of the family go to slaughterhouse five, where all old chips end up as members of Chipzilla's embedded family. As reported earlier this year, the Brave New World of the Celeron III in .18 micron technology will start relatively swiftly in the new year, as the chip mammoth seeks quickly to make .25 micron microprocessors relics of an age long gone. However, many observers wonder just why Intel is rolling out this eight-multiplied Celeron 533, when it could have released it very much earlier. The answer, as with many of these questions, is more to do with marchitecture than architecture. As we have already noted, chip rival AMD has the ability to scale Athlons now, but wants to get the maximum bucks out of its current range. And, in this respect, it is exactly similar to Intel, although not as fiendishly cunning in its pricing strategies. ® See also Intel to intro 750MHz CuMine PIII on Jan 10th
The Register breaking news

Intel faces possible Euro block on Pentium IIIs

A report from the STOA Committee of the European Union has suggested that the economic bloc look long and hard at the implications of Intel's personal serial number (PSN) embedded in the Pentium III microprocessor. (We know it's really dubbed the processor serial number, but our substitution of personal seems oh so apposite.) The STOA (scientific and technological options assessment) committe is presenting its findings to the European Parliament, in connection with the development of surveillance technology and the risk of abuse of economic information. According to a report presented by Franck Leprevost to the committee, and called Encryption and Cryptosystems in Electronic Surveillance, there is a prima facie case that the PSN breaches European protocols on security. The report recommends close examination of the role of the role of both the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the National Security Agency (NSA), in relation to the Pentium III's embedded security number. In part of the report, Leprevost states: "The PSN is very different from the IP (Internet Protocol) address, even though a user’s IP address can be revealed to any webpage he or she chooses to visit. "IP addresses are not as permanent as PSNs: many users have no fixed IP address that can be used to track their movements, as they may use masks via the proxy servers of Internet service providers. ISPs normally assign a different IP number per session and per user. "Users can also change ISP, use a service which guarantees their anonymity, etc. As it stands, the PSN can therefore be used for electronic surveillance purposes." The news report, in German, may be found here, while the full report to the committee can be downloaded from this page. ® See also ECHELON, NSA spooks face Congress scrutiny