1st > October > 1999 Archive

The Register breaking news

Sun to give away Solaris source code

Sun is planning to tilt rather more in the direction of open source by making Solaris source code free under its community-source licensing scheme. It did this earlier this year for Sparc and Java CPUs, but the plan shouldn't be interpreted as equivalent to the open source model - Sun is trying to build a kind of 'middle way' roadmap for itself. Under community source it'll be possible to get Solaris source code for free, and work with it, provided bugs are reported back to Sun and open interfaces to software developed are provided. So the idea here is that Sun gains the benefit of greater developer support for Solaris, but still retains ultimate control. Developers won't have to pay a licence fee for non-commercial products, but will have to pay if they get revenues from their products. That again is designed to attract developers, because up-front costs are lower, while at the same time retaining a more conventional commercial model. Sun's in-principle decision to make the code available does not however mean it's all going to happen at once. As will be the case with practically all of the companies who didn't follow the open source model from the start, Sun has quantities of other people's IP inside its code, so it can't just give the lot away. It's more likely that it will be released in parts, but in the long term the company still intends to have the whole of Solaris source available. Will the move work? It depends what you think it's intended to achieve. Because Sun isn't going fully open source, and because it's retaining ultimate control, it can't seriously be expecting to make Solaris a credible alternative to existing open source software. But even if it did throw away the whole of the community source licensing plan and really go open source, developers would still be suspicious of what the company was up to. That wouldn't work, and in any event Sun has some justification in being worried about Solaris falling victim to code-forking if it did give up control of it. But if we credit Sun with sufficient intelligence to know it can't hoodwink the open source community into embracing Solaris wholesale, we can postulate a less devious, more helpful and, yes, nicer strategy. Not totally nice, of course, but with possible nice effects, for a while at least. Open source developers at the moment do have a need for non-open source products. Linux works most cost-effectively on cheaper kit, but isn't yet so good at running the most powerful servers. So for larger deployments it often makes sense to mix Linux boxes with Solaris, SCO or even Tru64 ones (which is precisely how Compaq has been explaining its re-jigged Alpha strategy). Quite a lot of open source developers aren't going to need to work with big Solaris or AN Other Unix boxes, but as open source penetrates the enterprise further there will be an increased need for some of them to do so. That doesn't mean they should stop questioning Sun's motivation, but if the cat catches mice... ®
John Lettice, 01 Oct 1999
The Register breaking news

MS annual report reckons trials won't hurt company

Microsoft's FY results were announced in July, but the annual report which has just been released sometimes gives some interesting insights into how Microsoft would like to be perceived, if not what is actually happening. Revenue for the year was $19.747 billion (up 29 per cent, thanks largely to software volume licences) and net income up $7.785 billion (up 73 per cent but there was no space in the report to flag this obscene increase). With $17.236 billion cash and short-term investments (Microsoft prefers to call this its investment portfolio) at 30 June, some will be suggesting that this represents the fruits of monopoly profits. Gates' message was drafted for him of course, but it does contain the comment that Microsoft is developing voice control, and that this would be a "breakthrough". Well, for Microsoft it would be, but everyone there are now quite a few companies with it, so Microsoft is far behind, it seems. Wait for us: we're the leader! Then there's the continuing effort to beat Notes. Microsoft says that 50 per cent of work is now done in teams, compared with 20 per cent a decade ago, so it added what it calls "team productivity features" to the BackOffice family. Ever since somebody set up a digital dashboard on a large quartered screen in Gates' office, this modest development has been toted by Microsoft as though it will be a killer app. It won't be, of course, but no end of developments are coming, like high-end scalability and load balancing - still, millions of people have to reboot their PCs several times a day. TVs and toasters don't need rebooting. (CE-based car stereos do though - Ed) Microsoft is of course providing money to help others to develop and deploy broadband networks, but its strange that with all that money being spent on R&D, Microsoft has not been able itself to innovate and improve bandwidth. In fact, its software has resulted in much of the Internet congestion. Regulatory pressures "are unlikely to ease," Bill's ghost says, but the really bad news was that "some slowdown" in global PC sales is likely next year. In a long section dealing with "issues and uncertainties", litigation gets the briefest of mentions: "Litigation regarding intellectual property rights, patents and copyrights occurs in the PC industry. In addition, there are government regulation and investigation risks along with other general corporate legal risks." A "contingencies" section (evidently not appropriate for the "issues and uncertainties" section) mentions the Sun case, DoJ, and Caldera cases, with a few words on the SEC investigation. Is it quiet confidence or just bravado that tempted Microsoft to claim that "Management currently believes that resolving these matters will not have a material adverse impact on the Company's financial position or its results of operations." Interestingly, that's not the same as saying it expects to win. Microsoft apparently lumps OEM income in with US revenue, as a consequence of which US revenue is $13.7 billion and non-US revenue $6 billion. The "consumer, commerce and other" segment now being run by Belluzzo only marginally increased its revenue (by $19 million to $1,784 million), but the operating income loss declined a further $22 million to $1,072 million. That's a lot of loss. At the end, Deloitte & Touche attached their certificate on 19 July, less than three weeks after the end of Microsoft's financial year. This does not seem to be a very long time if the accounts are truly in the mess that Dean Schmalensee described. Could the auditors have been a little hasty, we wonder, in view of that SEC investigation? ®
Graham Lea, 01 Oct 1999
The Register breaking news

Six week wait for ATI OEMs

3D graphics market leader ATI is warning OEMs that there will be no product available for up to six weeks due to the Taiwanese earthquake. The dry spell will not, however, touch its handful of top OEMs, understood to include Dell and Compaq. The big guys will continue to get shipments. ATI, which makes video cards, was today warning smaller systems builders that delays could be anywhere from four to six weeks, a source told The Register. One of its Fabs, which makes the video card chips, is based in Taiwan. ATI was unable to confirm or deny the delay times, but a representative said: "The impact of the earthquake will hit the entire industry, not just ATI." ®
Linda Harrison, 01 Oct 1999
The Register breaking news

Post Nuclear Blast Hitachi re-opens DRAM plant

Hitachi has re-opened semiconductor and car-parts manufacture at eight plants, following yesterday's nuclear disaster in Japan's Ibaraki Prefecture, 90 miles north of Tokyo. The company said it had lost half a day's production of 64Mb DRAM -- but said this would have a minimal effect on prices. Hitachi employs 13,000 people at plants in the district, according to Dow Jones. The nuclear leak at Tokaimura has now stabilised, Japanese officials say, and 300,000 people living in the area around the plant have been told that they can now leave their homes. A 350-metre exclusion zone around the plant remains in force. Human error was to blame for the nuclear leak. Workers poured too much enriched uranium solution into a tank, which then exploded, setting off a chain reaction lasting many hours. At its peak, radiation levels soared to 15,000 normal levels Thirty workers were exposed to dangerous levels of radiation and two are critically ill. They will receive bone marrow transplants, in an attempt to save their lives. ®
Team Register, 01 Oct 1999
The Register breaking news

Ex-Compaqer Pfeiffer emerges at Intershop

Erstwhile Compaq CEO Eckhard Pfeiffer today joined the ranks of one-time senior IT industry executives who, having been booted out of a big league operation, resurface in a tiny company no one has ever heard of. Pfeiffer joins such distinguished names as Rod Canion (the guy he replaced at Compaq), ex-IBMer John Akers, one-time Lotuser Jim Manzi, practically every CEO Apple has ever had, and countless others. Pfeiffer's new employer is Intershop, a German e-commerce company that sees itself competing head-to-head with IBM. Following tradition, Pfeiffer won't take on any of Intershop's day-to-day operations -- as chairman, he will simply act as an advisor to the business' management team. "I will be leveraging the knowledge in the industry, providing senior experience to the relatively young team. It's an exciting opportunity," said dear old Uncle Eckhard of his new role. He is already in investor in the company. "I decided I was not going back in a CEO role," Pfeiffer admitted. He also said he has been exploring between 50 and 100 opportunities since leaving Compaq -- and we can just see the poor fellow now, peering at the cards in his local labour exchange wondering whether a bus driver has better career opportunities than a contract cleaner. In fact, he's been looking at investment opportunities and potential partnerships with venture capitalists. ®
Tony Smith, 01 Oct 1999
The Register breaking news

CallNet unveils bargain bin ISDN

London-based CallNet Plc is offering business and home Net users rock bottom prices for twin-channel, 128kpbs ISDN connections. The deal includes free ISDN installation by BT-approved engineers, a free external ISDN terminal adapter and up to 37 hours free calls per month in a deal which could save some users hundreds of pounds. At £27.25 a month for line rental (not including the bundle of free calls) CallNet Digital is on a par with BT Home Highway and Business Highway. Its per-minute call charges are also just a smidgen under those charged by BT. The snag is that like BT's ISDN offerings, users are tied in to the contract for three years. And with the prospect of broadband ADSL services just around the corner, that may be just too much to bear. ®
Tim Richardson, 01 Oct 1999
The Register breaking news

ICL man slept with actress – - official

Top ICL exec "sleeps rough with Jenny Agutter" has to rank as one of the best headlines of the year. What's more, it didn't come from us but in the guise of a press release from the services company. Before anybody rushes out to try and sell the story to the News of the World it's all perfectly harmless. For the official statement tells how Peter Slavid, business strategy manager at ICL, slept with the steam train stopping red-bloomered Railway Children actress to raise money to tackle homelessness. And he wasn't alone. More than 60 people from the IT industry were sponsored to sleep rough in aid of childcare charity, NCH Action for Children. It's hoped that the dossers who kipped down in central London last week have raised more than £150,000 for the cause -- plenty even for a "cuppa tea, guv". So, top marks to the PR bunnies at ICL for their adventurous, slightly saucy, but thoroughly teasing release. But you can all go to the bottom of the class for sending the it -- and the monster sized picture of Slavid and Ms Agutter -- via email without first warning anyone to expect to have half the morning wasted waiting for the cursed thing to download. In fact, do it again and we'll make sure you end up out on your ear and on the streets, OK? ®
Tim Richardson, 01 Oct 1999
The Register breaking news

E-mail security scare at LineOne

British Online Service Provider LineOne has confirmed it is investigating a possible breach in security of its Web based e-mail service. It's too early to say how widespread the problem is although at this stage it appears that only a handful of people have been affected. There is no evidence to suggest that the problem is on the same scale as that experienced by millions of HotMail users when Microsoft's Web-based e-mail service was hacked recently. Instead, it's understood that the glitch -- which allows people to view other people's e-mail -- is restricted to a handful of people. One Register reader, who asked not to be named, explained: "My partner logged on to check his account, and found himself reading someone else's mails. "So he logged back in, again his usual user name and password, and got someone else again, same story. "He did this TEN times and each time had someone else's account in full view. Which means, no doubt, that his mail is being read by someone else." Today LineOne md Ajay Chowdhury said he was aware of a problem. "There is an issue," he said "and we are urgently looking at it." ®
Tim Richardson, 01 Oct 1999
The Register breaking news

Samsung shuts down Rambus production

Samsung has suspended Rambus production following Intel's red-faced delay of the Rambus-compatible i820 chipset on Monday. For Chipzilla, it's a double blow -- earlier this year it made a $100 million investment in Samsung specifically to win the Korean company's backing for Rambus. That investment should at least cushion the blow for Samsung which has spent heftily in setting up RDRAM production and punching out memory chips. Still, at least it won't be paying any royalties to Rambus. The payments are linked to the number of chips shipping, and with no Rambus-compatible motherboards out there, no chips will ship, and so presumably no royalties will need be paid. Meanwhile, fellow Rambus producer Toshiba told EE Times it will stick to its plan of putting RDRAM into production in Q4. That said, it will now be focusing its efforts on the video game market, rather than the PC business. ®
Tony Smith, 01 Oct 1999
The Register breaking news

Mesh shows off Athlon 700 systems ahead of launch

UK system builder Mesh will be one of the first UK OEMs to launch PCs using the Athlon 700MHz chip on Monday. The Mesh Matrix 700T will be priced at £2045 (exc VAT). It will add to the London system builder's existing Athlon Matrix T range of PCs, which also includes the other four Athlon chips -- 500, 550, 600 and 650MHz. Despite other UK systems builders' reluctance to announce next week's launches, Mesh has already started advertising the new system. The Matrix 700T will have 128MB PC100 SDRAM, 22GB hard drive, 19in Mitsubishi monitor, 56kbps modem and Windows 98. Paul Kinsler, Mesh general manager, said the company had already started taking orders and would start shipping on 4 October. "Size matters, so people want to buy the Athlon 700," he said. Edward Percival, Mesh marketing manager, said: "It's the most successful launch of a non-Intel system we've ever had." AMD was last night still refusing to comment on the Athlon 700MHz launch. Rana Mainee, AMD's European research director, said he could neither confirm nor deny the 4 October start date. "But what I will say is that we have always said that we would be taking the Athlon to its full potential," said Mainee. "And higher speeds are in the pipeline." Mainee is due to start evangelising on the merits of the Athlon range of chips next week. His "Athlon Roadshow" kicks off on Tuesday, the day after the 700 launch, in Manchester. He has also been given the task of touring 13 European cities in six weeks, including London on 24 October. Mainee said the Athlon was attracting lots of new resellers to AMD, and he expected Q4 to be "a very busy period". ® Related Story K7/Athlon 700s: official launch date
Linda Harrison, 01 Oct 1999
The Register breaking news

K7/Athlon 700s: official launch date

So that's why AMD is cutting CPU prices on 4 October. It wants to make some room for the K7 700s, which make their official debut, Monday. The launch coincides nicely with this year's Microprocessor Forum, an influential industry gathering. For the first time, AMD has serious contenders in each sub 64-bit PC CPU market sectors, cranking right the way up from $40 SKUs for cheapskates up to $700 monsters, which might even make their way into the odd server or two. Reports of naked K7 700s for sale have popped up on the Web with increasing regularity over the last couple of weeks (and thanks to everyone who pointed us to the links). ® Related Story Athlon price cuts confirmed for 4 October
Drew Cullen, 01 Oct 1999
The Register breaking news

Net name row ends in silence

The threat of legal action against ISP Freenetname has failed to materialise despite the promise by Web company NetNames that it would "protect its trade mark most vigorously". Forty-eight hours after the Internet Technology Group ISP launched its service offering users a free domain, as well as Net access, lawyers for London-based domain name registrars NetNames contacted Freenetname asking the company to stop trading. NetNames alleged Freenetname was passing off and attempting to misappropriate the goodwill invested in NetNames. Freenetname denied any wrongdoing and said it had no intention to abandon the use of Freenetname. Steve Miller, the former marketing director of NetNames who this week joined Virtual Internet, told New Media Investor: "NetNames is going to protect its trade mark most vigorously, and of course our lawyers are in touch with Freenetname." That was almost a month ago and since then Freenetname has heard nothing. Rhian Ball, development director at Freenetname believes Netnames' silence suggests they have stepped back from the brink of legal action. "Having now had no response from NetNames or their lawyers for three weeks, we are advised that this delay has prejudiced a judge granting an immediate injunction against Freenetname to stop trading," she said. "However, NetNames could still take us to trial if they thought they had a case...[but that] would probably take many months to be heard," she said. She was adamant that Freenetname's defence was watertight and that NetNames -- like fictional pirate Long John Silver -- didn't have a leg to stand on. Late this afternoon Ivan Pope, md of NetNames reaffirmed the allegation that Freenetname was trying to dilute the value of the NetNames brand. "We're still pursuing this," he said adding that the case was still in the hands of his lawyers. ®
Tim Richardson, 01 Oct 1999
The Register breaking news

Flashpoint no flash in the pan for ATI

For the second year in succession, ATI has awarded Flashpoint a gong for being its top UK distributor. It's only three years since Flashpoint signed up with ATI, making the achievement that much more noteworthy. The distributor's managing director, Sukh Rayat, said: "ATI is a demanding franchisee in that they always expect us to match their extremely high levels of investment in this market. Exceeding their expectations will continue to be the key to our success." Good news for Flashpoint, undoubtedly, but with ATI hit by supply problems in the wake of the Taiwan earthquake, its distributors could be facing a product drought. The expected six week delay in getting kit to market is likely to hit ATI's distributors hardest, with major OEMs likely to get priority. ®
Sean Fleming, 01 Oct 1999
The Register breaking news

Amazon: the Q starts here

It appears online bookseller-cum-emporium could have a queue a mile long of people trying to rent e-tail cyberspace on its site. Outdoor goods e-tailer, the Sportsman's Guide, DG Jewelry (sic) Inc and its subsidiary NetJewels.com, and PC peripherals stockists iDOT.com are among those that have already signed up to take advantage of Amazon's 12 million shoppers through its new zShops initiative. E-tailers that rent the virtual real estate can sell up to 3,000 items for just $9.99 a month but they must also agree to pay Amazon between 1.25 and 5 per cent commission on items sold. Amazon's decision to open itself up as a virtual shopping mall has even excited analysts prompting some of them to class its stock as a "buy" option. Analysts at Credit Suisse First Boston rated Amazon a "buy" as did Argus Research which said the price target is $95.00 per share. As of lunchtime BST Amazon.com was trading at $79.94, down from a high of $81.5 on the day. ®
Tim Richardson, 01 Oct 1999
The Register breaking news

Apple to launch iMac II next week

The next version of Apple's iMac, the so-called C2 revision, will be launched on Tuesday, according to sources cited by Apple-watching Web magazine MacWeek. The event, to be hosted by interim CEO Steve Jobs, will also mark the availability to the public of MacOS 9. Of course, if MacWeek's sources are correct, it does rather make a mockery of Apple's aggressive stance against various other Mac-oriented Web sites for daring to publish pictures of the new machine in each of its three anticipated configurations. Apple's lawyers went into overdrive this week threatening to have some sites pulled from their ISPs' computers and others with damages in the order of the losses Apple may have suffered from would-be buyers putting off their iMac purchases until the C2 iMac ships. One site owner told The Register: "Apple's Legal Department has told me to remove some images and have threatened me with a lawsuit. They also have said that they will contact my ISP or Web Host and have my site shutdown if I do not comply with their request." Of course, if the C2 iMac is out next week -- just seven days after the first leaked pictures were posted -- Apple really can't complain about lost sales. Especially when it has apparently been keeping the channel free of the current iMac line-up for some time. As one US reseller source put it: "I haven't been able to order new iMacs for weeks." All of which suggests Apple's legal moves are more down to the management being pissed off about the leaks rather than the copyright infringement implicit in posting the company's photos without permission. Indeed, one site, MacFuture went so far as to suggest that the pics had been deliberately leaked to smoke out which employees had been spreading rumours. ®
Tony Smith, 01 Oct 1999
The Register breaking news

Leaked email exposes MS charity as PR exercise

Microsoft deliberately set out to use charitable contributions to bolster its image in February this year, according to a leaked internal Microsoft email we have seen. Ann Redmond, Microsoft corporate marketing research group manager, asked David Kaefer, a marketing research manager at Microsoft, to seek expert opinion as to "a preferred set of attributes" to help Microsoft with its image problem. Kaefer emailed ten Microsoft people seeking views as to what "image attributes" should be used for improving the effectiveness of "our branded philanthropic communication efforts" (which means getting the best mileage out of Microsoft's and Gates' charitable contributions). It was a most cynical exercise that shows beyond doubt that Microsoft "gives" donations and software to non-profit organisations to get favourable publicity. Many suspected this was happening, but were muted because it seemed somewhat churlish to criticise charitable contributions of considerable magnitude. No more. Four of the "preferred set of attributes" directly concern Microsoft's charity campaign, as we must now view it: "Microsoft's charitable giving improves the lives of many people. Microsoft is a generous and supportive corporate citizen. Microsoft cares about making a difference in my community. Microsoft is a leader in good corporate citizenship." Other attributes were concerned with how Microsoft is perceived: "Microsoft is honest. Microsoft is a company I trust." Ann Redmond figured in the trial testimony when an email from her of 23 February 1998 came to light. She was discussing a poll undertaken at very short notice at the suggestion of Gates, who had emailed on St Valentine's Day: "It would help me IMMENSLY [sic] to have a survey showing that 90 per se of developers believe that putting the browser into the OS makes sense... "Ideally we would have a survey like this done before I appear at the Senate [hearings] on March 3rd." Hart and Teeter was contracted to do a survey, and sure enough, back came the requested result, with 85 per cent of the 200 ISV respondents dutifully saying that the integration would have a positive impact on their company. It fell to Ann Redmond to point out that this conclusion was at odds with another survey of developers that showed only 27 per cent agreeing that IE was an integral part of the OS, and that the questions had been rigged. As for Kaefer, he has some experience in using survey results. When he worked for Godbe Research, he told Los Gatos Town Council that "Most people in survey research are interested not just in what is today but could be if we march through a certain process." It sounded very close to manipulation. Meanwhile, the joint effects of Gates' advancing years, some gentle pressure from his wife to take things more easily, a nudge from his father to get more involved in charitable activities, and a strong desire by his PR handlers to repair some of the damage caused by his video deposition during the trial has resulted in his being pushed towards orchestrating his foundation to suit the needs of the moment. Although Gates announced long ago that he intended to give most of his wealth to charity, the timing and manner of doing this can leave no doubt that it is being done as a diversion from the trial. There is no modesty about it, and no private helping of the needy - just photo opportunities. He seeks publicity for every donation, with the PR machines of Microsoft and his foundation in top gear. The altruism of bringing Internet access to libraries in the poorest communities in the US and Canada with Microsoft software must be somewhat suspect. It transpires that Microsoft's frequent gifts of software are valued at the full retail price. IBM had been winning the donations war and valued its donations at wholesale prices [why not cost price? - tax - Ed], but Microsoft decided to use retail prices in 1996 and snatched the title. IBM subsequently calculated that had wholesale prices been used, it would have won again. Software gifts = junk bonds Josef Woodman, founder of Lightworks Technology Foundation, said that "Inflated software gifts are the junk bonds of the new philanthropy." There is increasing criticism about some donations. A programme to help students from ethnic minorities to attend university discriminated against under-privileged children, but the PR benefit was greater if minorities were helped. In another situation, there were protests about donations to encourage population control advocates. As has long been suspected, there is indeed a positive correlation between the gifts and an attempt to change the image of both Gates and Microsoft. Just as reports on the oral hearing in the trial were appearing last week, there were announcements that a Gates donation of $50 million was being used to combat cancer; a Microsoft-funded team to lead global health initiatives was being set up; Redmond employees were offering technical assistance to non-profit groups to ensure their systems were Y2K ready [but is Microsoft?]; Gates gave $25 million for TB vaccines; Taiwan-based Microsoft employees reacted to the Taiwan earthquake by cancelling plans for the 10th anniversary celebration, and donated the $79,000 budget for the event to help deal with the disaster (with Microsoft itself giving a further paltry $30,000 for relief work); and yesterday, "Dress for Success" in Seattle received $40,000 to help provide interview-appropriate clothing. If Microsoft thinks that giving money to charity, either directly or through Gates, should ameliorate the treatment it receives at the end of the present trial, it should ponder just why there is a trial and what damage it has caused with its business practices over the years. Playing the charity card will not work. ®
Graham Lea, 01 Oct 1999
The Register breaking news

DOS alive and not very well hidden in Millennium beta

It now seems pretty clearly established that Microsoft will not be removing DOS from Millennium, but early reports form people who've seen Beta 1, which went out this week, indicate that the attempts to hide Dos instead are at best perfunctory. Getting rid of DOS no doubt remains on the MS wishlist, because it would make PCs easier to use and more reliable, but as far as Millennium is concerned it looks like wishing and doing are two different things. For Beta 1 Microsoft has removed the exit to Dos option from the shutdown menu, but according to one tester, "the Bootgui= option is still in the msdos.sys file; the default is '1' which boots to full blown Windows, and if '0' is used, the computer boots to DOS 7.1." Further testers who've contacted us however point out that changing this setting does not boot real mode Dos, and that "there is no way to access a real mode command prompt without replacing IO.SYS." Which is nevertheless an intriguing thought. Effectively, it would seem Dos is still there, and it's just the access hatches that are starting to come out. But if that's the case, Microsoft is really just putting off the day when it has to bite the bullet. This may come with Neptune, but that's a 2001 product at best, leaving a big hole between the product with DOS shoved under some camouflage netting and the one with no DOS at all. So, referring back to the PC2001 system design guide issued earlier this year we have a suggestion. PC2001 says that "Microsoft is investigating the development of non-retail versions of Windows 98 and Windows 2000 that will support PC systems that do not use legacy components such as Super I/O, the 8042 controller, and MS-DOS." Presuming that Microsoft is still investigating this, but won't exactly be doing it in Millennium, then there's the time, and probably the demand, for another rev between Millennium and Neptune. Gratuitous Register believe it or not: PC2001 is a joint effort between Microsoft and Intel, and was published around about the same time as Microsoft was sending out the first Millennium pre-beta code. At that time, brave and ambitious things were being said by Microsoft about Millennium as a major effort in the consumer OS market and a key plank of EasyPC. Subsequently, things seem to have gone into rapid reverse, with Millennium earlier this week being described as no big deal, maybe just a service release. Well folks, go back to PC2001, and remember this stuff was written when Millennium was being hyped as a big deal: "Supporting system features being proposed for the next OEM service release of Windows 98 (Windows 'Millennium')... Ahem. ®
John Lettice, 01 Oct 1999