16th > August > 1999 Archive

The Register breaking news

Intel changes rules on slot one

A year ago Posted 14 August 1998 -- over a year ago Intel is set to change the ground rules on its architecture once more with the introduction of a modification to its slot design later on this year. An Intel representative confirmed today that it would move to a new slot design dubbed SECC 2. "This is the mark two version of slot one," he said. The design is a cut down version of slot one, he said. "It's the current slot one package with the backing plate taken off so the heat sink can be attached directly to the processor." There are two reasons for the change to the Pentium II cartridge. Firstly, it will cut down the cost of the surrounding packaging, producing cost savings for Intel. But secondly, and possibly more importantly, it is a result of the faster process technology Intel is currently developing. Joe D'Elia, senior CPU analyst at Dataquest UK, said: "This results in a product that will be cheaper to build. It looks as if Intel is learning from having to build the slot architecture and this boils down to cost reduction." He said that although it was undoubtedly true that Intel's advances in process technology resulted in heat reductions, the fact they were introducing faster processor speeds to some extent cancelled that out. As it moves from .25 micron technology to .18 micron and then to .13 micron, the heat issues become less and so the necessity of wrapping the chip with what one OEM described as a "waffle machine" will become unnecessary. Higher clock speeds are also likely to emerge from the introduction of SECC 2, but the move has no connection with the 370-pin Socket Intel is readying for next year. That is intended to bring the cost of manufacturing and production down, to enable Intel to compete the more successfully with its lower end rivals AMD, Cyrix and IDT/Centaur. ®
Mike Magee, 16 Aug 1999
The Register breaking news

Pentium II family reaches end of the road

Intel is now saying the Pentium II/450MHz part has limited availability and that means the end of the line for the entire PII family. The chip giant has relentlessly pushed the Pentium III family into its place during the course of this year, and that process will be complete within the next few weeks, according to reliable sources. Over the weekend, we reported that the Pentium III/450 will have five chip companions when it enters DodoLand shortly. An Intel representative said: "We've said that the Pentium III shipments will cross over in Q3." That is likely to be the closest we're going to get to a confirmation until it happens. Some accounts, which we cannot yet confirm, suggest that the Pentium III will drop to $305/1000 in the near future. The news also means that our RegMark™ benchmark, which compared the Pentium II to the Celeron family, also shuffles into the gulag. (Celeron trashes Pentium II in new RegMark™ tests) But we have a replacement for the RegMark™, and doughty reporter Pete Sherriff is compiling a new comparison between Celerons and Pentium IIIs called RegMark99™. Intel of course, is continuing to develop the Celeron family, but there is some confusion over when the 100MHz front side bus (FSB) version arrives. According to our local UK representative, this will "definitely not" arrive until next year. This, of course, contradicts Intel's own slide on its very own site which suggests Q3 for the beasties. ®
Mike Magee, 16 Aug 1999
The Register breaking news

Happy Cat leaks stash of Intel futures

Small Japanese corner shop Happy Cat has got its claws on Intel's future plans up until the year 2001, with details of its major introduction in Celeron, Coppermine, Cascades, PIII, Timna and Xeon technology. The document, which you can view here, also outlines the future sockets Intel will adopt over the next two years. According to the document, Willamette will use a 423 socket design. In the year 2000, we will see Cascades technology using Slot 2 and going from 600MHz to 800MHz, and later next year, Cascades technology with 1Mb of cache at speeds of up to 750MHz. Willamette looks like it will arrive around Q3 of next year, as anticipated, with huge cache, as exclusively reported here earlier this year, and using a 423 pin socket. According to the document on the site, Timna, Intel's system on a chip device, will come with 128K level two cache on the die at speeds of 533-700MHz and with a 370 pin socket. Foster will come at speeds greater than 1GHz in 2001 and use a 603 pin socket. There's so much information here that we will take time to digest it and return to the subjects later. We don't have our trusty Lernout&Huspie Japanese-English translation software here in the office, but will also set it to work later on in the day. ®
Mike Magee, 16 Aug 1999
The Register breaking news

Opera user base grows despite ‘end’ of browser war

Facts are getting in the way of Microsoft's claim that there is not a market for browsers. Opera, the Norwegian browser that sells for $35 after a 30-day free trial, has established itself as the contender, according to research company BrowserWatch. The latest figures show Internet Explorer with 43.7 per cent, Navigator with 35.4 per cent and Opera with 9.46 per cent (which Opera claims has now climbed to 10.2 per cent). The data are derived from visitors to BrowserWatch, who are mostly developers, Web site designers, journos and browser nuts. In the latest reported period Opera was used by 7076 visitors, which indicates a reasonable sample size. Other news from Opera, apart from its recent release of the beta for BeOS (it's 1.38MB), is that a version for Psion/EPOC32 is about 80 per cent complete and should be next. This is likely to be followed by a Mac version (now around 70 per cent complete, after a false start). A Linux version (about 35 per cent done) has a side-development in the form of a separate text-only small and fast browser that supports JavaScript and is said to be suitable for use in mobile phones. It also works with Windows, and is a candidate to replace Lynx. Opera won't be tied to a release date yet. Jon von Tetzchner, Opera's CEO, said that tests show that Opera for Linux, which is based on the new QT2.0 by Troll Tech, is faster than Netscape. Free/Net/BSD versions are expected to follow. Opera has managed to negotiate the opera.com name at last (it was operasoftware.com), which should make it easier to find. ®
Graham Lea, 16 Aug 1999
The Register breaking news

AMD K7 puts in early appearance

Today's the day we can expect a raft of Athlon PC announcements from AMD's OEM partners, but eagle-eyed UK TV viewers got a sneak preview yesterday. Anyone watching the shopping channel, QVC, on Sky Digital on Sunday evening (and who wasn't? –- Ed) will have seen an Athlon-based PC advertised with a forecast delivery time of three to five days. The machine is branded Spirit, but is made for QVC by Midlands-based systems builder Evesham Micros. The Spirit has a 550MHz Athlon chip, 128MB PC100 memory, 15GB Maxtor HDD, DVD-ROM, 17in monitor and internal modem. It is covered by a three-year warranty and is priced at £1762.40 (inc. VAT). According to one Register reader, QVC said anyone ordering the Spirit PC could expect delivery within three to five days. ®
Sean Fleming, 16 Aug 1999
The Register breaking news

Hacker jailed after Vodafone SMS sting

A spurned computer buff was jailed last week after he hacked in to Vodafone's messaging network to get revenge on his former employer. Scott Reid fooled thousands of mobile phone users into calling his former company's switchboard after telling them they had won a car. Switchboards were jammed for days and the company lost around £10,000 of business, Nottingham Crown Court heard last week. The 23-year-old hacked into the Vodafone short messaging network and sent a text message to international subscribers. Around 32,000 unsuspecting punters were told that they had won a Peugeot 106 and had to call a certain number to claim it, according to Saturday's Daily Telegraph. The number given belonged to Nottingham company GS (UK), which supplies software to the embroidery industry and employed Reid from the tender age of 16. Michael Fowler, prosecuting, said: "The switchboard was swamped to such an extent that British Telecom had to filter calls for three days." Reid had designed GS (UK)'s Web page and email system, but was found working on a rival computer programme to the one sold by his employers. He was discovered and made to stop the project. He resigned last year and started plotting his revenge, which included setting loose a Trojan Horse virus to businesses in the embroidery industry. Reid admitted to two charges of unlawful modification of computer material and two of unauthorised access to a PC. He was sentenced to three months and had his computer confiscated. Judge Christopher Pichers told Reid: "These are not student pranks. This is deliberate industrial espionage with the potential to cause serious damage to a business computer." ®
Linda Harrison, 16 Aug 1999
The Register breaking news

Iomega launches OEM'd CD-RW drive

Iomega, the financially troubled storage specialist, today took a step -- several steps, actually -- backwards into its past to announce shipment of a product not based on one of its own technologies. Marking Iomega's return to OEM-hood -- it started out offering systems based on SyQuest technology -- was the launch of the $209 ZipCD, the company's first rewritable CD drive. What we have here is a standard CD-RW mechanism cunningly branded to match Iomega's line of own-developed products. Still, it's not as retrograde a move it sounds. Iomega reckons some 12 million CD-RW drives will ship this year, and, as a storage company with a well-known brandname, it makes sense for the company to move into this market. And since Iomega is having a job selling many of its other products, most notably its Jaz removable hard drive solution, breaking into a popular area of the storage market, is a smart move. Oddly, the ZipCD is an internal-only product, suggesting Iomega doesn't want it to distract attention too much from its own products. It also suggests this is largely a money-grabbing exercise -- why else not offer the ZipCD in one of the company's slickly-designed enclosures? Given the state of Iomega's finances -- last quarter it lost $61.7 million on shrinking revenues of $349 million -- it needs to make money, and make it quickly. Churning out standard CD-RW units in Iomega wrapping isn't a bad way of doing that. ®
Tony Smith, 16 Aug 1999
The Register breaking news

Cisco buys UK outfit for $55 million

Networking giant Cisco said it had paid $55 million to buy UK company Callista. Callista makes technology which allows a number of phones to work over Internet systems. The move is part of Cisco's plans to develop voice and IP data over phone networks. ®
Team Register, 16 Aug 1999
The Register breaking news

Footy fight site hit by white hat hackers

A group of "white knight" hackers who trashed a Web site used to organise soccer violence appears to have failed in its quest to clean up the game. Soccer thug Paul Dodd's Web site was trounced on Friday rendering its message board completely useless, according to the Daily Star. The message board is used to post details about fights between rival soccer fans, most notably, the clash between hooligans from Millwall and Cardiff who clashed on the first day of the season. "WE GAG WEB HATE SOCCER THUGS," the tabloid bragged on its front page. One of the hackers even phoned up the Star to tell the rag about what they had done. "Once we had infiltrated the Web site we scrambled it," he said. "There is no way anyone can post a message calling fans to do battle any more. It is a dead site." If that's the case, then there's been a Web miracle. Today, Dodd's site is fit as a flea and shows little sign of being "scrambled". In fact, it appears brimful with the bloodletting reports from the weekend's fixtures. Even if the site had the living daylights kicked out of it, it wouldn't have taken a genius to set up another fight forum. The problem would simply be moved on. Unfortunately, the boys in blue -- that's not Chelsea, by the way, but the police -- are sitting on the touchline doing sweet FA. The Star reported that secretly, the police have endorsed the illegal actions of the hackers. For some reason, the authorities are unable to crack down on the site -- and the people behind it. ® See also Soccer thugs wield Web as a weapon
Tim Richardson, 16 Aug 1999
The Register breaking news

HP hopes to trump Compaq on Unix, NT support

Sources close to Hewlett Packard said today that it is likely to announce support on Merced for both HP/UX and Windows NT in the very near future. Today, HP is expected to announce good earnings for its third financial quarter. That could be viewed as a pre-emptive strike against Compaq, which will, tomorrow, announce that the Integrity XC system will produce a virtual SMP system. (Story: Compaq to go enterprise crazy tomorrow) HP is closer to Intel than Compaq, having cooperated with the chip giant on producing Merced in the first place. Since Compaq took over Digital, the company has pushed Alpha hard as the platform for Windows 2000, D/UX (now called Tru64), and, more recently, the Linux operating system. But the jury is still out on whether corporate bodies will adopt Linux in numbers, despite support from Intel, and latterly Trillian. HP has, so far, kept relatively quiet about the Linux OS. Said Terry Shannon, industry consultant and editor of newsletter Shannon knows Compaq: "I wonder if endianess will be an issue... Merced is little-endian, as is NT. HP/UX, at least currently, is big-endian. And note that HP currently does not support NT on PA-RISC." Compaq has always maintained it can square the Endian circle, with Tru64 and the Alpha platform. ®
Mike Magee, 16 Aug 1999
The Register breaking news

Capellas only gets ½ as much as Pfeiffer

Worthy US newspaper is reporting that Mike Capellas, the CEO of Compaq, is only being paid $895,000. That compares rather unfavourably with ex-CEO Eckhard Pfeiffer, who got nearly twice that plus a stash of options. But perhaps Mr Capellas does not need barbers quite as much as Mr Pfeiffer did... ®
Adamson Rust, 16 Aug 1999
The Register breaking news

Amiga developer in talks to buy Commodore name

European software and hardware developer Iwin Corporation has entered into negotiations with Dutch PC vendor Tulip to acquire the name and logo of the long-defunct Commodore. Iwin's interest in the Commodore brand stems from its long involvement with the Amiga. The company's line of servers and workstations are Amiga-based, and much of its software runs on the platform. Tulip bought Commodore in September 1997, primarily to acquire a well-known consumer computer brandname for its own push into that marketplace. Soon after it sold the Amiga name and platform to Gateway. Tulip released a series of Wintel PCs under the Commodore label, but the line never really achieved the levels of success of the machines that made Commodore's name in the first place. Iwin clearly wants to reunite the Commodore name with the Amiga, and certainly it has a greater affinity for the original Commodore than Tulip ever did. Of course, whether the Commodore brand still carries any weight is highly open to question -- it certainly doesn't appear to have helped Tulip much -- even if its re-allied to the Amiga platform. Iwin said it want to "bring back the glory days of Commodore as a brand name in the computer business with innovative and hi-tech products". Perhaps, but given that's what Amiga Inc. is trying to do with its own brandname and still provoking the ire of Amiga fanboys, Iwin may not have much luck. That said, it may simply be trying to win over precisely that part of the Amiga community that currently feels alienated by Amiga's latest moves -- most notably its decision to base future products on Linux -- that appeals to Iwin, which may have no desire to innovate at all but simply trot out a line of retro computers under the Commodore label to appeal to the more backward-looking user. And, indeed, what do we find on Iwin's Web site (described as "everything which is important for Commodore lovers" -- assuming there are any left these days) but its plans to release an Amiga-based version of the second-generation Commodore 64, plus a more standard Amiga box. Iwin will also offer its existing Iwin-branded Amigas under the Commodore logo, if it gets it. Given Tulip's 'success' with the Commodore brand, Iwin probably will get the name -- initial talks are due to take place on 27 August. Whether Iwin can make anything of the name, is another matter... ®
Tony Smith, 16 Aug 1999
The Register breaking news

Date rape drug – two arrested for Net sales

Two men were arrested for allegedly peddling the "date-rape" drug GHB on the Net. Sixty-three year old Carl Gorton from Florida and John Hedrick, 22, were collared by state authorities in Michigan and could face up to 30 years in jail if found guilty, according to a report by the Associated Press. The pair was arrested for selling the ingredients and kits to make the GHB (gamma hydroxybutyrate) drug. The "G-WiZzZzZ" kits retailed for $200 each and were so easy to use even a child could have made the drug with little effort, it was reported. GHB is one of a number of synthetic drugs used by rapists to render their victims unconscious before assaulting them. The drug is both tasteless and odourless, and leaves the victim with no memory of the crime. Earlier this month it was reported that a Californian date-rape gang was broadcasting videos of its "conquests" on the Net after drugging their victims with the sedative Rohypnol. ® See earlier story:Date rape gang circulates videos on the Internet
Tim Richardson, 16 Aug 1999
The Register breaking news

Evolution to be benchmarked against computers

Darwinian evolution is being put to the test by a team from Michigan State University, the California Institute of Technology and the University of California in Los Angeles. Researchers hope that computer organisms will shed light on the most fundamental questions about life on Earth. The programme is designed to mimic life in the form of relatively simple organisms that can multiply and will randomly mutate. The computer organisms will be judged on their reproductive success, the key to survival in a Darwinian model of evolution. Professor Lenski, from MSU commented: "If we do see the same patterns [as in the world] this suggests that these patterns are general properties of life, be it organic or digital. And if we get strikingly different patterns, this raises interesting new questions, about why one self replicating system behaves this way, while another behaves some completely different way." The programme consists of two kinds of digital organism, a simple one whose role is only to reproduce, and a more complex one which must reproduce, but also perform some calculations along the way. The environment that the 'bugs' exist in can be changed by the team to see how they adapt. Successful species will be rewarded with more computer time. The experimental timescale offered by this programme is rather more convenient than waiting several millennia to test Darwin's ideas. ®
Lucy Sherriff, 16 Aug 1999
The Register breaking news

End-of-the-week bug to eat GPS

A mini millennium bug (a buggette, perhaps?) is going to strike at midnight next Saturday (21 August), as the GPS systems' counter rolls back to zero. The GPS system –- that’s global positioning satellites -- keeps track of time by counting the number of weeks since it went into operation, but it was only programmed to count the weeks for 20 years, and the end of the cycle will be reached at the weekend. US officials have issued warnings to people who rely on GPS - pilots, climbers, fishing vessel – while in the UK the Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions has said it has no obligation to warn users because GPS is a US system. Whatever happened to the 'Nanny State'? End of the week bug or not, the satellites are not going to fall out the sky though. The problem will be with handheld receivers, and then probably only those older than five years. The kind of problems users are likely to run into are: the receiver will be unable to locate the satellites, so it won't work; it will take longer than usual to find the satellite; it will appear to be working, but won't be showing correct information. Stateside, military and commercial systems are well prepared, and in the UK the Ministry of Defence says that it has completed all necessary fixes to its systems. The US warned that small businesses and amateur users could be hit by the bug. ®
Lucy Sherriff, 16 Aug 1999
The Register breaking news

Red faces at AT&T over Intel phone bill

AT&T formally withdrew its case against Intel -- as first reported here -- later on Friday after the world saw an unseemly mess where Phonezilla seemed to be stomping all over Chipzilla. A red-faced employee admitted that the writ was issued without regard for the size of the company it was sueing... ®
Adamson Rust, 16 Aug 1999
The Register breaking news

Athlon PC pricing is a secret

We rang the sales office of systems builder Carrera this afternoon to enquire after the price of its Athlon-bearing PC. What with this being the day AMD's OEM partners start selling Athlon-based machines, and all, on the surface, this should have been a very straight forward request. Not on your life. According to one of Carrera's sales folk, the price of such a beast is a secret. "But you are selling Athlon-based PCs," The Register asked. "Yes," came the reply. "So, how much are they?" we enquired. "You're a journalist, not a customer – we can't tell you," said the voice on the phone. "But this information is in the public domain, is it not," we persevered. "Yes, it is. But I'm still not telling you." There's nothing like having an astute business mind, is there? ®
Sean Fleming, 16 Aug 1999
The Register breaking news

PIII/600 with 133MHz FSB outed!!!

Our friends over at the site which clocks many chips to their limit, and then some more, is reporting today that a British firm has posted the price and due date of an Intel 600MHz Pentium III using the long-fabled 133MHz Front Side Bus (FSB). Kyle at HardOCP is pointing to Dabs Direct, which says the part will ship on the 26th of September next. An Intel representative said: "This is probably a typo." He said that all Intel had committed to was to produce the part in the second half of this year -- and the company is on schedule so to do. No one from Dabs Direct could be contacted at press time, although a search on the phrase Pentium III does indeed reveal a Slot One version with that date. ®
Mike Magee, 16 Aug 1999
The Register breaking news

Chip site spins off Linux site…

A well-known hardware site has spun off a Linux site dedicated to solving hardware problems new users might have. The site, which is spun off from CPU Review, is called About Linux. According to William Henning, editor of both sites, it will be devoted to people interested in migrating to Linux in a hardware sense. Henning said the site will look at commercial software, and the technical issues surrounding migration. There is still much work to be done. ®
Mike Magee, 16 Aug 1999
The Register breaking news

MIPS unveils own MMX for 64-bit CPUs

MIPS today introduced its own version of Intel's Multimedia eXtensions (MMX) and AMD's 3D Now! With the uninspiringly dubbed MIPS-3D Application Specific Extension (ASE). The technology extends the existing MIPS 64-bit architecture with "additional graphics-oriented floating-point instructions that reduce code size in graphics processing algorithms and improve 3D image processing performance". The improvement, MIPS claimed, can be as much as 83 per cent. The technology can generate 25 million polygons per second, falling to ten million polys per second when you add lighting (both on a 500MHz processor). Not bad, perhaps, given that the technology is 13 new instructions the work by pairing up two 32-bit floating-point words and packing them into a single 64-bit register. That's not quite true SIMD operation, but it's clearly close enough for MIPS. And, after all, we're not talking high-end graphics applications here. The real motivation for the development of the MIPS-3D ASE comes from the work MIPS' is doing with 3D graphics specialist ATI to build a set-top box reference design. That already contains ATI's Rage graphics acceleration, so the two technologies will play off each other for even better performance. And MIPS hopes the SIMD functionality will improve its chips' chances in the embedded space, but here it's going up against Motorola's upcoming AltiVec technology, to be included in the PowerPC 7400 (aka G4). That said, MIPS reckons MIPS-3D increases the die size by less than 0.5mm squared, so it probably retains the cost advantage. MIPS-3D ASE will debut in the upcoming MIPS64 20000 CPU. ®
Tony Smith, 16 Aug 1999
The Register breaking news

Athlon PCs go on sale

OEMs need no longer be scared of AMD's wrath -- they can now officially announce if they are launching Athlon systems. Mesh and Time Computers have been among the first system builders to put this chip in PCs. Available from today, Mesh is launching its Matrix range of machines with 500, 550 and 600MHz Athlon processors. The lower-end PCs have a 3dfx Voodoo 3 3000 graphics card, 10GB hard drive and 17in monitor. Prices start at £1075 exc. VAT. The higher end has 128MB of PC100 SDRAM, 7200rpm 22GB hard drive and 19in flat-screen USB-connected monitor. The PCs are available online or from Mesh showrooms. Time -- Granville Technology's PC business -- launched just one Athlon machine today, with a 650MHz processor. It has a 20GB hard drive, 256MB of SDRAM, 32MB graphics RAM and a 19in monitor. It is priced at £2399 exc. VAT, and is available via mail order and at Time showrooms. Panrix has launched systems with 500, 550 and 600MHz Athlon chips, priced at £999, £1099 and £1499 respectively. These range from the basic 64MB PC100 SDRAM model, with 13GB hard drive and 17in monitor, to the 600MHz with 128MB SDRAM and 7200rpm 18GB hard drive. Machines are available in the Panrix showroom in Leeds or by ordering direct by phone. Carrera also announced Athlon machines. Evesham Micros will be launching soon, but nothing was announced today. Centerprise said it was trialing the chip at the moment. ® See also AMD K7 puts in early appearance Athlon PC pricing is a secret AMD goes public on Athlon Bootnotes: Industry Gossip
Linda Harrison, 16 Aug 1999
The Register breaking news

Home shopping boom fuelled by Net

Online sales are set to make up 2.5 per cent of all retail sales in Britain by 2003, according to the latest shopping survey by Verdict. What's more, the growth in online sales -- via the Net and TV -- has sparked a renaissance in home shopping which had been in decline over recent years. Although home shopping increased by 7.2 per cent last year, e-shopping grew by a massive 41 per cent. ®
Tim Richardson, 16 Aug 1999
The Register breaking news

James Bond aided by Fujitsu printer

Product placement in movies is big business –- it brings in extra funds for the film-makers and guarantees publicity for the brands involved. Recent examples have included Apple's PowerBook helping to save the human race in Independence Day and its similar role in Mission Impossible. But now, one of the more sublime product placements of recent years has come to light. Fujitsu is supplying printers to the new James Bond movie, The World is not Enough. Printers. James Bond. Nah, surely not. How would that go? "Do pay attention double-oh-seven, it may look like an innocent Fujitsu printer, but observe closely... it prints and it umm, well, prints... and, ahh..." Perhaps Q has finally run out of groovy gadgets to show the promiscuous secret agent. Can there be any other reason for Fujitsu's involvement in The World is Not Enough? Presumably the film makers wanted to quash the filthy rumour that the British Secret Service still uses typewriters and Morse code. Or could it be that Fujitsu has incorporated previously unmentioned features into its printers? For example: the ability to print onto self-destructing paper; the secret rocket launcher function buttons; remote enemy network crashing (or isn't that Back Office 2000 -- no that's Remote Access, sorry.); paper jams perfectly timed to foil the evil Dr. Von Canon's plan to take over the world... etc. A Fujitsu spokesman, Terry Forrest, commented: "Although the product isn't used to finish off the villain in the last scene, it is a great privilege to be chosen to feature in the Bond film." Death by printer? The mind boggles. ®
Lucy Sherriff, 16 Aug 1999
The Register breaking news

All-new RegMark99™ shows Celeron outperforms Pentium III by 2.3 times

Despite Chipzilla's vain attempts to hide the value for money differential between the Celeron and Pentium II ranges highlighted in our original RegMark™ benchmarks - including this week axing the entire PII range - we can exclusively reveal that little Celeron continues to be a thorn in Intel's side as it continues to munch dollars from the chip behemoth's bottom line. The flagship Pentium III does indeed offer superior performance over Celeron, especially in the MultimediaMark 99 and CPUMark99 benchmarks, but PIII floating point performance is way down on the cheapo chip due to Celeron's on-die L2 cache running at full core speed. The original RegMark™ index only took FPU performance and price into consideration, so in The Register's fine tradition of fair play, we have now included an additional two parameters into the all-new RegMark99™ tests - MultimediaMark 99 and CPUmark 99 - in a bid to give a more accurate price/performance comparison. Chipzilla still makes it hard to find comparative performance details for its two ranges of desktop CPUs, but the numbers are there on the Intel website if you know where to look. So welcome, please, the all-new RegMark99™ Bangs-Per-Buck index, calculated by the simple method of dividing the sum of the three benchmarks by the price of the chip.
Pete Sherriff, 16 Aug 1999