12th > May > 1999 Archive

The Register breaking news

Bay in Nortel takeover talks?

A Year Ago From The Register 6 May 1998 We thought you might be interested in the following item published by a UK reseller in an email newsletter at the weekend. "In the race to acquire data networking expertise, telecommunications equipment makers Northern Telecom and Lucent Technologies appear to be in hot pursuit of Bay Networks. Sources close to Bay and other industry observers believe the company is on the verge of being acquired by - or at the very least, entering into a partnership with - one of the two telecommunications vendors. According to a source inside Bay, CEO David House met with Nortel officials in recent weeks and received a buyout offer from Nortel "that was not to House's liking." A Bay spokesman declined to comment on whether the company is negotiating to be acquired." Is this true? We have to concede our ignorance on this score. But a Bay buyout would make sense. As far as The Register is concerned, only Cisco and 3Com have secured their place on the networking equipment vendor top table. Below these two, the market looks awfully fragmented. All the other networking vendors are up for grabs - and that includes Bay Networks , Cabletron, Newbridge Networks, Ascend, Shiva, Madge, Fore. The grabbers will be - already are - telecoms equipment manufacturers Lucent and Nortel. Siemens looks like another contender. And making up the quartet is Compaq. It stated aim to become the world’s third biggest networking vendor is ludicrous…if the company intends to do this organically. If nothing else, Compaq’s ambitions could be the reason why the market rumours about a bid approach to Cabletron are becoming increasingly insistent. But it is difficult to see this one as a goer - for the time being. After all, Compaq still has an awfully big Digital Equipment meal to digest. And an awful lot of warehouses to empty. ®
The Register breaking news

Telecom sales boost Cisco Q3

Cisco benefited from equipment sales to telecom service providers upgrading for the Internet, and has just reported a good third quarter. Sales were up 44 per cent to $3.15 billion, with earnings up 33 per cent to $646 million, compared with the year-earlier quarter. Around a third of Cisco's sales are to service providers, and these were up 70 per cent on the year-earlier period. The result was marginally better than financial analysts were expecting. Cisco expect to put $2.5 billion of sales through distributors, which is $500 million more than CEO John Chapman forecast in February. At the beginning of this month, Cisco said it would not deliver the TGX-8750 switch it was developing for voice and data products, but would now include the ATM technology in a product later in the year. This will give Ascend Communications (which is being acquired by Lucent) a temporary advantage. One of Cisco's claims to fame is that it reached a market value of $100 billion more quickly than any other company. A 2-for-1 stock split was also announced last night, and the share price rose nearly 7 per cent on the day in after hours trading, after the results were known. When the stock was not split earlier this year, the share price went down. In fact the share price has been very volatile, since it has been as low as $41 and as high as $120 in the last year. ®
The Register breaking news

MS trusty Allaire scores DNA integration deal

Is Microsoft looking after those who have supported it in its defence against the US government well? Well, possibly. During the contempt case brought by the Department of Justice against Microsoft, the company felt it needed some external support. Microsoft's legal department is hardly any better run than its Windows development, so when in November 1997, during the so-called contempt case, it was decided that some declarations from some independent vendors might be useful, Microsoft came up with a few. The model for these solicited declarations, from the likes of Allaire, Compaq, Rational and Spyglass, was so rigid that the texts of several paragraphs (as to why the developer wanted to use IE rather than any other product) are word-for-word identical -- a remarkable coincidence the Court of Appeals seemed not to notice. Entirely coincidentally again, yesterday Allaire Corporation did well out of a Microsoft deal. Spyglass has already been funded to do an embedded browser, and Compaq will have continued with its advantageous terms for Microsoft software. In an announcement yesterday, Allaire said it had reached agreement with Microsoft to "enhance the integration between Windows DNA and Allaire's Cold Fusion Web application server". This is to be the first of several formal relationships between Microsoft and Allaire, the announcement added. ®
The Register breaking news

Cheap airline pioneer plans huge cybercafe chain

Stelios Haji-Ioannou, the owner of the no-frills, Luton-based budget airline Easyjet, is investing £10 million in cybercafes. The first will be in Victoria, London and should open on 21 June, with 420 workstations. SH-I says that with large establishments, access charges can be as low as £1 an hour because of economies of scale. Access costs in existing cafes are typically £5 to £7 an hour, and they tend to have only up to about 20 machines. An easyEverything Internet shop will also be opened in Amsterdam later this year, with 500 workstations. Tenders are at present being invited. The intention is to attract those who do not at present use the Internet, and to offer them 24-hours-a-day electronic shopping. David Phillips, AOL's UK MD, hinted this week that AOL will be involved with Internet access shops, and suggested people "stay tuned". It seems possible that AOL will be linked to the EasyGroup venture. If this turns out to be true, remember you read it first in The Register. ®
The Register breaking news

US military vetoes NT, Exchange for battle system

The US Army, currently not deployed in Kosovo but who knows what may happen next (it's in Earls Court -- CIA maps again -- Ed), does not trust Windows NT or Exchange security. Microsoft hasn't been allowed to tender for the US Army Battle Command System (ABCS), which requires secure messaging. The winner is Lotus Notes, running on Sun Solaris. Microsoft was peeved, especially as it had persuaded the UK Information Technology Security Evaluation Criteria (ITSEC) certification board to give Windows NT 4.0 (with Service Pack 3) an E3/FC-2 rating, which Microsoft calls "the highest security evaluation possible for a general purpose operating system". MS also claims this is "roughly equivalent to a C2 evaluation under the US Trusted Computer Security Evaluation Criteria (TCSEC) regime, better known as the Orange Book". Mary Ellen O'Brien, director of DoD sales, Microsoft Federal, confirmed that MS is working with a third party, which she refused to name, to develop a Unix client for Exchange. This is part of the fight back, as Microsoft is concerned that Notes may increasingly replace Exchange in the military. Terry Edwards, director of technical integration for the US Army's Force XXI initiative at Fort Hood, Texas, said that "Lotus Notes is a far more technically superior product". At Fort Hood, Solaris x86 is being used, because "NT cannot support out security requirements". Colonel Robert Railford, director of the US Army's Defence Message System, noted that Notes on Solaris gave "the best solution for the ABCS tactical war fighter". Note, however, that the US military also believes Jeff Papows has a glittering combat record (see Lotus chief's 'combat' tales) -- go figure. Microsoft is not announcing any date when it will try again with its Unix-based Exchange client. ®
The Register breaking news

IBM wins $1bn Nintendo deal for PowerPC

IBM is to produce a custom PowerPC chip to power the next generation of Nintendos, according to a report in today's New York Times. The deal, due to be announced at E3 in Los Angeles later today, is said to be worth $1 billion to IBM, and will cover tens of millions of chips. These will be tailored 400MHz parts, and the machines themselves will go onto the market late next year. The Nintendo design win will undoubtedly have been gained on price, but at last will give IBM PowerPC a reasonable volume customer. Ironically, one-time Risc workstation rival MIPS rebuilt its business on the basis of selling large volumes of cheap Risc chips into the games market, so if this is PowerPC's big break it's simply repeating something MIPS did years ago. One major selling point will be that the chip will run with a high performance graphics chip designed by Wei Yen, formerly of SGI. The deal will go some way to securing the future of PowerPC, but takes the chip line further away from the mainstream desktop arena it was pitched at way back in 1991. This continuing refocusing causes some angst at Apple, but most of the time Apple seems only to consider buying PowerPC from IBM, then goes ahead and buys Motorola. But if IBM gets a couple more Nintendo-type customers and builds a market for itself in low-cost PowerPC, it could always try to sell the chips to Apple for its planned low-cost line. And then Apple could buy from Motorola anyway. Or Intel or NatSemi. ®
The Register breaking news

Amazon ad campaign fails to impress

Online bookstore Amazon.co.uk has made such an embarrassing stab at making itself sound hip and trendy it's enough to make you cringe. In a series of three radio ads a spokesman for Amazon.co.uk tries to find an alternative location to store its 1.5 million books. Bemused and slightly hacked off receptionists at Strangeways Prison, Heathrow Airport and Wembley Stadium try to explain to the annoying caller that their prison/hangar/sports stadium are unsuitable as a book warehouse. The sorry truth is, with-it Net company Amazon.co.uk keeps its books in an anonymous warehouse in Slough -- a town that has only marginally more of a personality than the semiconductor industry. The Register asked the man on the street - in this case a barber in Hampshire, called Nick, who's a dab hand with a cut-throat razor and listens to the wireless all day - for his opinion on the Amazon ads. He said: "It's not as if they're even witty." (We couldn't find a London cab driver to ask - Ed). Nuff said. ® Click here to email Tim Richardson
The Register breaking news

Another senior Compaq exec flies the coop

Compaq has lost its fourth top dog in a month, with the departure of its head of services. Compaq senior vice president and general manager of services, John Rando, will resign as soon as a replacement is named, effective from 1 July, said the company. His departure will enable him to pursue personal interests, according to a Reuters report. Rando was brought into the company last June when Compaq swallowed Digital. He joined Digital's services group in 1976 as a software specialist, eventually rising to senior vice president. His sudden resignation from the $6.5 billion computer services unit is the latest in a string of departures. Last month saw the ousting of CEO Eckhard Pfeiffer from the Houston-based computer giant. Pfeiffer left after Compaq warned that first-quarter profits would fall short of Wall Street expectations. Earl Mason, Compaq CFO, and Michael Heil, Compaq sales chief, have both subsequently been given the order of the boot. The announcement was described by industry analyst Carl How at Forrester Research as "part of a changing of the guard at Compaq." "There is a power struggle going on," he told Reuters. ® Click here to email Linda Harrison
The Register breaking news

AMD K7 trounces PIII Xeon, says c't

German magazine c't is reporting that unofficial benchmarks they have for the AMD K7 platform show that it trounces a Pentium III Xeon chip. If your German's any good, go here. The magazine, however, asks the same question we posed some time back about the role of Coppermine in the future. (See story: Coppermine could finish AMD off for good) Meanwhile the AMD rumour mill is once more turning, with postings on Yahoo suggesting that ST Microelectronics (formerly SGS Thomsen), could be in talks to acquire the ailing company. ®
The Register breaking news

Can AOL beat MS and the cable pack to Web TV?

Yesterday's AOL TV announcement involved a quantity of smoke and mirrors. Apparently the move takes AOL into space, delivers on the company's long-telegraphed plan to meld the Web and interactive TV, and - more or less as an incidental - shuts the door on Microsoft, but in reality these are places AOL is heading towards. It hasn't quite arrived yet. The key aspect of the announcement is the Hughes/DIRECTV connection. That provides satellite TV programming to the set-top boxes Philips is building, and with the aid of NCI's software those boxes will also be able to browse the Web. Compare and contrast with the Microsoft position. The Gates/McCaw Telesdesic project is intended to provide broadband satellite data communications, but the satellite network doesn't exist yet. Microsoft is trying to get CE boxes into the interactive TV market, but it's uphill work, and there's no real deployment yet. Microsoft also owns WebTV, which uses a similar two pipe system to meld TV and Web, but WebTV's performance so far has been less than stellar. Against this, the AOL announcement looks like a leapfrog, but it's maybe less of one than you might think. DIRECTV is a US satellite TV operation which claims 7 million customers, and while that's not bad, AOL (and indeed, DIRECTV) are going to want a lot more than that, in more countries than that. The combination of Web and TV also isn't quite as combined as might initially appear. Broadband data will not be sent from satellite initially, and the set-top boxes will just use phone lines for two way communications. The Web side of the boxes might help DIRECTV sales climb faster, and AOL branding and marketing might carve open a whole new market, but the deal isn't necessarily a sure-fire winner. On the debit side, note that AOL TV boils down to pretty much what every cable TV outfit is going to be doing soon, and you might reckon that AOL has been forced to go with satellite because it hasn't managed to score deals with cable TV companies. On the other hand, many cable TV companies appear slow/functionally brain-dead when it comes to data. If AOL moves fast, it could get the drop on them, and by virtue of the power of the brand force them to co-operate. Even failing that, a satellite-only route may be feasible. Largely speaking, the technology AOL is using already works, so can be rolled out quickly. Deals with existing satellite operations (rather than next generation 'coming soon' networks) should be fairly easy to strike, if the technology can be demonstrated to be effective. And as the broadband satellite networks come into service, AOL should be able to start leveraging its way in there too. One example of these, Skybridge, is particularly worth watching for an AOL connection. Skybridge is Alcatel-backed, and is intended to cover similar ground to Teledesic. Alcatel meanwhile has been mentioned as a possible screenphone partner for AOL, so here we have the next possible alliance. But mightn't the rise of land-based broadband networks nip AOL's schemes in the bud? It's possible, but it's also possible to get too excited about speed of deployment here. The cable companies and telcos are to a great extent still putting the infrastructure in, and are at best in pilot with any planned interactive services. They're currently far more active in buying and selling one another than actually going live, so there's a gap in the market. It will narrow, certainly, but it's still wide enough for AOL to squeeze through. ®
The Register breaking news

Moto flogs SCG group

The uncertainty over the future of Motorola's semiconductor components group (SCG) is over. As expected, Texas Pacific Group has taken the lead in a management buy out, worth $1.6 billion to Motorola. Texas Pacific Group is a private investment partnership specialising in technology buyouts. The independent enterprise will be headed by Motorola general manager Steve Hanson, with the current management team and employees remaining in the company. There are 10,000 SCG employees and had a turnover of $1.5 billion in 1998. ®
The Register breaking news

MS to spend another $4bn on UK C&W deal?

Microsoft's spending spree is - believe it or not - accelerating, with the company now tipped to blow $4 billion on up to 30 per cent of UK cable TV operator CWC, a Cable & Wireless subsidiary. What with MS already having slices of Telewest and NTL, and sweethearts deals with British Telecom on the go, it's beginning to look worryingly close to a Redmond shop round these parts. That's not all -C&W cellular subsidiary One2One is on the market, and some kind of mega version of the Nextel deal could be on the cards. But that would cost even more dollars than Microsoft has spent so far, possibly too much for MS chief financial dispenser Greg Maffei, who's been knitting all this stuff together. The common thread in the deals seems clearly an attempt to buy up franchises that are being won by or have already gone to the opposition. The $600 million for Nextel switched Microsoft's MSN into the slot that was going to be occupied by Netcenter, while $5 billion to AT&T expanded the company's commitment to CE up in the direction of 10 million units (but only maybe, and Java hasn't been officially blown out yet). In the UK, if the CWC deal goes ahead, CWC's commitment to NCI boxes will stand in some peril. NCI has already been pressured by Microsoft in NTL, another UK outfit where $500 million for 5 per cent resulted in a more MS-friendly deployment plan, and Microsoft got 29.9 per cent of Telewest last week as part of the confusing AT&T deal. Which gets more confusing here, as Telewest and CWC have been talking about getting together. The Telewest stake didn't actually result in more units for CE, but Telewest's future will likely go into the pot with any CWC deal, and that will be when MS hits the jackpot again. But here's a thought. You know they say CE is too expensive to make it in the consumer electronics market? Well obviously. If we allow a generous 5 million units for the $5 billion to AT&T, that makes the boxes $1,400 each, if you factor in a 40 per cent margin for Microsoft. The ones for Nextel, at $600 million for 3 million users, are only $200 each ($280 with margin), but hey - they're only cellphones. ®
The Register breaking news

Big guns form Citrix-inspired ASP group

Citrix Systems seems to have rounded itself up an impressive posse of members for a new "international advocacy group" intended to promote and define standards for application service provision. The Application Service Provider Industry Consortium acronymises itself as ASP Industry Consortium, funnily enough - presumably you can't change standards once you've got them in ASPIC. Citrix will of course deny any leadership here, protesting that all of the members of the server-based computing industry should work together as equals. But Citrix holds the chair of, er, ASPIC. Other major movers and shakers among the first 25 members include AT&T, Cisco, Compaq, IBM, Sun, and UUNET. Both Oracle and Microsoft are absentees, although Great Plains Software, which did some testifying for Microsoft a while back, is in there. ASPIC itself is important in the long term because the Application Service Provider route is a logical one to take after ISPs. Existing ISPs can add value to their offerings by giving users access to remote applications, and new entrants can offer access to large scale apps via data centres. As yet, there's not a lot of it about, but a few Citrix partners (for example Telecomputing, also in ASPIC) are already doing some business. The interest of most of the companies mentioned above is understandable. Microsoft itself has plans along ASP type lines, but naturally they're different. Bill Gates envisages giving users BackOffice access across the Web, and offering backup and storage for rent, but he'll do this the Microsoft way, if it happens. Oracle too is on the case with Business Online, which it's piloting in conjunction with Sun - so will it join? The complete membership at launch was as follows: AT&T; AristaSoft Corp., Boundless Technologies, Inc.; Cisco Systems, Inc.; Citrix Systems, Inc.; Compaq Computer Corporation; Cylex Systems, Inc., Ernst & Young LLP; Exodus, Inc.; FutureLink Distribution Corp.; GTE; Great Plains Software (NASDAQ: GPSI); IBM Corp. (NYSE: IBM); Interpath Communications, Inc.; JAWS Technologies Inc.; Marimba, Inc.; Onyx Software Corp.; SaskTel; Sharp Electronics Corp.; Sun Microsystems, Inc.; The Taylor Group; Telecomputing ASA; UUNET; Verio, Inc.; Wyse Technology. ®
The Register breaking news

Free calls man caught in Web of threats

The man behind a new service that is set to offer 0800 toll-free Net access in the UK has received threats against himself and his family. Richard Jay of Freecall-UK said people have even turned up at his house and threatened him. The matter is now in the hands of his solicitor, he said, speaking to The Register today. Freecall-UK -- which is set to provide toll-free calls to the Internet in return for users receiving online ads via email -- is due to be formally launched at the end of this week. But many Net users who have already registered for the service have used newsgroups to vent their anger and doubts about the true nature of the service. The Register was contacted by one reader who expressed concerns that Freecall-UK was not all it claimed to be and was just an attempt to harvest email addresses and personal details. This was denied outright by Jay who said that he had been inundated with enquiries from Net users eager to subscribe to his service. "Full details about Freecall-UK will be released on Friday," he said. "But I can tell you it's causing a real stir in the industry." That may be so, but when The Register spoke to its contacts at Screaming.net and The X -Stream Networks -- both of which already offer limited toll-free access -- they both said: "Freecall-UK who?" ® Click here to email Tim Richardson
The Register breaking news

LineOne gunning for AOL UK

The MD of UK online service provider (OSP), LineOne, is gunning for AOL UK. Ajay Chowdhury, who has only been in the job for two weeks, said he had AOL UK in his sights and that LineOne was well placed to knock it off its perch and become the UK's leading OSP. Outlining his hopes for the next year, he said that LineOne now had more than 200,000 registered members. No doubt his more aggressive stance was buoyed by a recent report in the Financial Times which said that while AOL was dominant in its home market, it was losing its grip abroad. "Outside the US…AOL has failed to build up [its]subscriber base… [and in the UK its] market share is less than 10 per cent," said the FT. Chowdhury was also quick to jump on AOL's indecision when it said it was committed to maintaining a subscription-based service while also trialing other pricing models. With £12 million in his pocket to invest in LineOne to give the service a real push, Chowdhury said he is relishing the next six months. ® Click here to email Tim Richardson
The Register breaking news

Big Blue announces Big Brother smartcards

As part of its effort to become the dominant force in the ebusiness market, IBM has launched two smartcard enablers. Called the Internet Module and IBM Corporate Campus, they are designed to give companies easier access to customer and employee information. The Internet Module is basically a pumped-up supermarket loyalty card. It will hold a customer’s personal details as well a record of all their transactions. This can relate to physical visits to a store and to business conducted over the Web. It is part of the quest for the Retail Holy Grail - knowing what each individual customer’s shopping behaviour is. How often do they shop, what goods are they most interested in, do they respond to special offers and so on. The Internet Module smartcard is being developed in conjunction with Chip Application Technologies, a smartcard vendor. Corporate Campus addresses the problem of giving the right level of security clearance to individual employees. The idea here is that the bog-standard company ID badge is transformed into a smartbadge, containing an employee’s details. Used as a swipe-card, it will allow access to certain areas of a company’s offices and will restrict access to other parts. It could cover access to everything from the room that houses the company mainframe right down to the toilet. An added benefit to the more 1984-minded company, is that such a card can be used to track what time employees arrive for work, what time they leave at the end of the day, how much time they spend in the toilet, how often they visit the vending machine, and so on. A smartcard with Corporate Campus could also be used to restrict access of a different kind - access to applications on the network. With this in mind, it has been designed to carry a user’s Lotus Notes account details, allowing an individual to access their Notes account from any Notes-ready workstation. Corporate Campus will ship in the second half of 1999, IBM said. ®
The Register breaking news

Lycos/USA Networks merger collapses

Three months ago today If you visited The Register exactly three calendar months ago today, this is one of the stories that will have greeted you. At the time, the story was described as 'erroneous and irresponsible' by a top Lycos spin doctor. Turns out to have been painfully accurate too. Original story posted 12/02/1999 The proposed buyout of Lycos by USA Networks has been called off, The Register can exclusively reveal. Sources close to the deal confirmed that the paperwork surrounding the proposed buy-out had been ripped up and thrown in the bin even before the ink was dry. Neither company was prepared to comment the news that the deal had been called off. Yesterday, both parties said the deal was moving ahead (see Lycos merger to form e-commerce giant). But soon after, CMGI, a major stockholder of Lycos, said it was "generally supportive of the Lycos/USA Networks transaction as previously reported, but reserves the right to reassess its position as developments unfold". Shares in Lycos plummeted $33 on Tuesday after the deal was announced. It lost a further $7 on Wednesday but rebounded yesterday by $16 to close at $103.25. ®
The Register breaking news

What the hell is… a thin client?

Larry Ellison, CEO of Oracle, walked the walk and talked the talk about thin clients oh so long ago... But Oracle has now dumped the entire idea, sources close to Ellison told The Register today. So it was an expensive waste of money, right? Other companies like NCD and Citrix might not think so. A thin client is a bit of software which might sort of work on a cut down machine which doesn't necessarily use Intel x86 chips. Citrix makes software that lets such cut down machines run Windows software. If and when Citrix signs a deal with Sony for the Playstation II, which we confidently predict will happen, that will mean that for about two hundred quid you could have a box in your living room that outperforms Coppermine, the AMD K7, or whatever. Oracle's Ellison caused a kind of galvanisation in the PC industry. He was concerned to knock the opposition, to wit Bill Gates of Microsoft. And he succeeded. Gates was so confused by Ellison's message that PC vendors like Compaq and Dell, offered to make so-called NetPCs. IT journalists call such machines doshless workstations. They rely on central servers to deliver data. And that's what a thin client is. And the word galvanise means to put tin on the outside of the can. ®
The Register breaking news

Informatica fights for ERP in the OK corral

Informatica, a privately held company that IPOd a couple of weeks ago, seeing its share price at launch rise by 84 per cent, is close to striking a European deal with IBM. The company, said founding president Diaz Nesamoney, had struck deals with SAP R/3 and PeopleSoft for two main reasons. The first reason, Nesamoney admitted, was because Informatica had to obtain access to the 15,000 database tables in SAP R/3 and PeopleSoft's technology too. The second reason, he said was because SAP and PeopleSoft had around 20,000 ERP users worldwide and they could re-sell the software company's solution. Nesamoney said that other products in the Informatica stable would certainly work with DB/2. But he denied a deal with Big Blue is on the cards. The source staunchly maintained that an IBM European deal is in the offing. ®
The Register breaking news

Granny attempts virtual Cyberspace suicide – but fails

With a nappy to catch her adrenalin and a cotton bonnet to protect her skull should she fall during her 175 ft descent down the ICL Tower in Manchester, 82-year-old Granny Molli Turner is about to step out into the unknown. Sorry, but we don't have the pics to prove she made it to the ground without messing up the pavement...but sources tell us she made it OK. Oh baby...we're almost beside ourselves with frothy contentment -- just don't let that moustache put you off. OK?! ®
The Register breaking news

Death of a deal – Lycos and USAi come clean

The party’s over - and not before time. Lycos and USA Networks (USAi) have finally come clean and admitted that their ill-fated plan to merge has been killed off. US cable news station CNBC broke the news and an official statement was released this afternoon. The statement said: "Lycos, USA Networks and Ticketmaster Online-CitySearch (TMCS), today jointly announced that they have agreed by mutual consent to terminate their merger agreement." It went on: "The termination agreement requires Lycos to pay USAi and TMCS an aggregate of $35 million under certain circumstances if prior to July 15, 1999 Lycos enters into an agreement with respect to, or becomes subject to, certain acquisition proposals. In addition, subject to certain exceptions, USAi and TMCS each has agreed that until July 15, 1999, it will not acquire Lycos stock or make any proposals to acquire Lycos." The $18 billion deal would have created an ecommerce giant, but it never won the hearts and minds of Lycos’ shareholders. It was this shareholder pressure that has been blamed for the deal’s demise. Online newswire service Bloomberg quoted Lycos CEO Robert Davis, from the CNBC report: "Yeah, I'm disappointed in how it went," he said. "I believe in the value of the transaction. Since the very first day we put it together, we've been fighting the tape." Back in February, The Register ran a story that said - categorically - that the sickly looking deal had turned blue and died. That story created such a brouhaha that Lycos’ head of marketing took time out of her busy schedule to call our journalistic standards ‘lacking in integrity’ and to describe the story as ‘erroneous and irresponsible.’ We are looking forward to her calling back now to tell us what a good job we do. But we ain’t holding our breath. ® See earlier stories: More woes for Lycos/USA Networks deal Lycos/USA Networks deal in limbo, VP says Lycos/USA Networks deal hits more stormy weather Lycos/USA Networks merger collapses
The Register breaking news

UK Eurocrats vote to legalise spam

Europe's decision to legitimise unsolicited email -- spam -- was swayed by the support of MEPs from the UK. Every single UK Conservative and UK Labour MEP -- except one -- voted in favour of the legitimisation of spam, according to The Register's very own gravy train spotter. This is at odds with the belief that the UK is the home of fair-play and the arbiter of good judgement and level-headed politics. With such a ludicrous and potty law sailing through the European Parliament, it's more than ironic that such moves have been supported by politicians from the UK. For it is the UK that has whinged the most about ludicrous Euro policy including food mountains, the common agricultural policy, the outlawing of Bombay Duck in Indian Restaurants , the rejection of curved bananas and the banning of fatty sausages. Now they want to legalise spam. Whatever next? ® Click here to email Tim Richardson
The Register breaking news

Rise raids Intel for new CFO

Rise, the low-cost CPU contender, has poached its new CFO from Intel. Newboy John Vinnanan (four Ns -count them) will mastermind Rise finances, as the company ramps up production big time in Q2. Rise is keen to exploit the space left by Cyrix, which last week retired hurt from the x.86 CPU market. Rival Winchip supplier IDT could also soon be out of the picture, if US reports that it is reconsidering its finances are correct. That would leave Rise with the low-cost clone field more or less to itself - or at least until Transmeta, the secretive Californian fabless chip company, makes its play for world domination. ® See also: Rise close to announcing fab partner NatSemi exits PC CPU market IDT will produce S370 processor
The Register breaking news

Rise raids Intel for new CFO

Rise, the low-cost CPU contender, has poached its new CFO from Intel. Newboy John Vinnanan (four Ns -count them) will mastermind Rise finances, as the company ramps up production big time in Q2. Rise is keen to exploit the space left by Cyrix, which last week retired hurt from the x.86 CPU market. Rival Winchip supplier IDT could also soon be out of the picture, if US reports that it is reconsidering its finances are correct. That would leave Rise with the low-cost clone field more or less to itself - or at least until Transmeta, the secretive Californian fabless chip company, makes its play for world domination. ® See also: Rise close to announcing fab partner NatSemi exits PC CPU market IDT will produce S370 processor
The Register breaking news

Rise raids Intel for new CFO

Rise, the low-cost CPU contender, has poached its new CFO from Intel. Newboy John Vinnanan (four Ns -count them) will mastermind Rise finances, as the company ramps up production big time in Q2. Rise is keen to exploit the space left by Cyrix, which last week retired hurt from the x.86 CPU market. Rival Winchip supplier IDT could also soon be out of the picture, if US reports that it is reconsidering its finances are correct. That would leave Rise with the low-cost clone field more or less to itself - or at least until Transmeta, the secretive Californian fabless chip company, makes its play for world domination. ® See also: Rise close to announcing fab partner NatSemi exits PC CPU market IDT will produce S370 processor
The Register breaking news

Rise raids Intel for new CFO

Rise, the low-cost CPU contender, has poached its new CFO from Intel. Newboy John Vinnanan (four Ns -count them) will mastermind Rise finances, as the company ramps up production big time in Q2. Rise is keen to exploit the space left by Cyrix, which last week retired hurt from the x.86 CPU market. Rival Winchip supplier IDT could also soon be out of the picture, if US reports that it is reconsidering its finances are correct. That would leave Rise with the low-cost clone field more or less to itself - or at least until Transmeta, the secretive Californian fabless chip company, makes its play for world domination. ® See also: Rise close to announcing fab partner NatSemi exits PC CPU market IDT will produce S370 processor
The Register breaking news

Rise raids Intel for new CFO

Rise, the low-cost CPU contender, has poached its new CFO from Intel. Newboy John Vinnanan (four 'N's -- count them) will mastermind Rise finances, as the company ramps up production big time in Q2. Rise is keen to exploit the space left by Cyrix, which last week retired hurt from the x86 CPU market. Rival supplier IDT could also soon be out of the picture, if US reports that it is reconsidering its finances are correct. That would leave Rise with the low-cost clone field more or less to itself -- or at least until Transmeta, the secretive Californian fabless chip company, makes its play for world domination. ® See also Rise close to announcing fab partner NatSemi exits PC CPU market IDT will produce S370 processor
The Register breaking news

Rise raids Intel for new CFO

Rise, the low-cost CPU contender, has poached its new CFO from Intel. Newboy John Vinnanan (four Ns -count them) will mastermind Rise finances, as the company ramps up production big time in Q2. Rise is keen to exploit the space left by Cyrix, which last week retired hurt from the x.86 CPU market. Rival Winchip supplier IDT could also soon be out of the picture, if US reports that it is reconsidering its finances are correct. That would leave Rise with the low-cost clone field more or less to itself - or at least until Transmeta, the secretive Californian fabless chip company, makes its play for world domination. ® See also: Rise close to announcing fab partner NatSemi exits PC CPU market IDT will produce S370 processor