1st > May > 1999 Archive

The Register breaking news

Internal Compaq memo outlines management re-shuffle

An internal Compaq memo from Ben Rosen and senior executives to staff has outlined changes happening at the company. It is reproduced in full, below From: Office of the CEO Sent: Thursday, April 29, 1999 1:42 PM Subject: Organizational Change To: Compaq Team Two weeks into our tenure in the Office of the Chief Executive we are focused intently on making the changes necessary to accelerate the speed of decision making, beginning in the most logical place - the top of our organizational structure. As an initial step, we have determined that our major geographic regions and Corporate Marketing will report directly to the Office of the Chief Executive, eliminating the need for a separate Worldwide Sales and Marketing Organization. This change will accelerate our decision making and bring us even closer to our customers. Effective immediately: * Andreas Barth, Senior Vice President and General Manager of Europe, Middle East and Africa, will report directly to the Office of the Chief Executive; * Peter Blackmore is promoted to Senior Vice President and General Manager of North America and will report directly to the Office of the Chief Executive; * Enrico Pesatori will assume the newly created position of Senior Vice President and General Manager of Global Regions reporting directly to the Office of the Chief Executive. Global Regions will comprise Asia Pacific, Greater China, Japan and Latin America. The following general managers will report to Enrico: Paul Chan, Vice President and General Manager, Asia Pacific Philip Yu, Vice President and General Manager, Greater China Hajime Takayanagi, Vice President and General Manager, Japan Enrique Ospina, Vice President and General Manager, Latin America. Enrico will continue to act as Senior Vice President of Corporate Marketing until a replacement is named. Graeme Woodley, Vice President of Global Accounts, will join the Corporate Marketing team. Michael Heil has decided to accept an opportunity to become CEO of a start-up company. Mike contributed greatly to the success of Compaq over his four years with the Company. He was a driving force behind Compaq's move into the consumer segment and helped build the Consumer Group into a vital element of our business. We thank him for his contributions and wish him well in his future endeavors. We know you will join us in congratulating Andreas, Peter, and Enrico in their new roles and in supporting this new organizational structure. Ben Frank Ted
The Register breaking news

Oregon warns public to stay away from Klamath

Yes we know that Intel code-names its processors after American places. But did you know that Klamath in Lake in Oregon is one of the world's great sources of blue-green algae. And did you also know that in 1996, Oregon's health division warned the public to stay away from Klamath -- because the lake was so polluted with bird droppings. Blue-green algae contains an unusually long list of rich nutrients and is being promoted as the latest wonder health tonic. In America, growing numbers of people eat this algae , even though it smells like "old seaweed and is mad from slime of the surface of the lake", according to the Daily Telegraph. Apparently it can cure everything from Alzheimer's disease to herpes. In Britain, the River Authority issues health warnings whenever there are blue-green algae outbreaks -- mostly because the stuff is poisonous. If it brings you up in a rash -and that's if you touch it. Imagine what it could do to you if you eat the stuff. Blue-green algae of the Klamath variety is also poisonous. A 1997 Consumer's Association study of Klamath Lake -sourced tablets sold in health stores, showed that four out of seven contained microcystins -- poisons that can damage the liver, the Daily Telegraph says. The Consumers' Association also found low-levels of a "nerve poison that causes paralytic shellfish poisoning (PCP), which has caused muscle and nerve-cell damage in people who have eaten shellfish". ®.
The Register breaking news

MPR analyst writes to Register

Letter Microprocessor Report analyst Peter Glaskowsky sent us this email, which may be useful to readers (see Direct Rambus shows no gains over current memory technology). Glaskowsky writes: "This paper is not relevant to the PC market for the following reasons: 1) The simulated processor is not an x86 processor, and is not substantially like any x86 processor used today. 2) The simulated L2 cache uses a 128-byte line size, four times the size of the L2 caches on PCs. 3) The simulated L2 cache is 1M in size, 2-8 times larger than the L2 caches used in PCs. 4) The simulated processor bus is 128 bits wide, twice the width of PC processor buses. 5) The simulated conventional DRAM arrays are also 128 bits wide, twice the width of DRAM arrays in PCs today. 6) The simulated applications were not, and did not behave like, the applications and operating systems used on PCs. Factors 2-6 happen to work in favor of conventional DRAMs such as SDRAM and against DRAMs with more sophisticated architectures. (I don't know enough about factor 1 to decide which way it would skew the results, but it is very likely to have an effect one way or the other.) I can explain these factors in more detail if there is enough interest. This study will have no effect on Intel, Via, Compaq, or any other PC company capable of interpreting it correctly. The study should be ignored by participants in the PC market (or better yet, repeated with new conditions that match those that exist in PCs). A few disclaimers are in order here: I don't think there's anything wrong with the study itself. The authors defined and justified their conditions quite adequately. They never said the study was relevant to the PC market. I have no axe to grind with SDRAM, nor do I have any bias toward DRDRAM or other advanced DRAM architectures. I think it would benefit your readers to post this email (or a summary of it) on your site so they can get some perspective on your original story. Thanks in advance. Peter Glaskowsky Senior Analyst, MicroDesign Resources" Mike Magee replies: The interesting point here is Peter's point that it would be useful to perform a similar study for x86 processors. The authors of the report have emailed The Register and thanking us for showing an interest in the subject. Incidentally, we used to receive copies of the Microprocessor Report but have been dropped from the circulation list. Perhaps you'd like to add us again, Peter. Our address is on the front page. ®
The Register breaking news

Chimpzilla attacks Gorillazilla

Official confirmation that Atiq Raza will become the president and chief operating officer of AMD is now on the company's site, in the shape of a press release. We report this as we now seem to have been appointed public relations officer to AMD. (Story AMD spams Mike Magee) And there are also transcripts of Sanders speech to shareholders now floating around the Wibbly Wobbly Web. Sanders' slides suggest that Intel, in his eyes at least, is a Gorilla. We call Intel Chipzilla, so does that make AMD Chimpzilla? ®
The Register breaking news

Should The Register sue AMD?

The outraged managing partner of a high powered American Internet law firm has emailed The Register to say that he was absolutely incensed at the shabby treatment we have received at the hands of AMD's European press relations company, PBA, and has offered to look into and prosecute the matter for us without charge. (Story: AMD spams Mike Magee) Robert Helmer, a managing partner of a law firm based in St Louis, thinks we have a case and says the charges could be "intentional, negligent, reckless, and wanton disregard of the truth leading to damage to Mike Magee's reputation as a serious journalist". He suggests this: Since the parties are not unequivocally litigious, Mr. Magee and the Register will decline the American's offer, if PBA immediately takes the following actions. 1) Send a follow up email to everyone on the list explaining their error, and fully accepting responsibility and apologising. 2) Send an open letter to the journalistic community and the public (for publication in the Register), once again apologizing for their mistake, and asserting their regret that the high journalistic standards of Mr. Michael Magee and the Register have been sullied. We've been at the receiving end of lawyer's letters and received legal threats from companies including Intel and AST over the years. The worst AMD has done so far (apart from spamming us) is trying to furtively tape record us a couple of years ago. So we're inclined not to be litigious. We would like AMD and/or PBA to donate an enormous sum of money to the charity of our choice (The Mike Magee Malevolent Fund). We just wish it had been Intel who spammed us...AMD is a bit hard up at the moment. Mr Helmer, as well as being a practising attorney, also runs a very useful Web site called Shell Extension City. ® What do you think? Does Mike Magee have a reputation that can be destroyed? Does he have high journalistic standards? What is The Register tariff? Post a message on our Message Forum