14th > January > 1999 Archive

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Corel ships Linux/ARM-based departmental server

Corel has announced the availability of its latest Linux machine, the NetWinder Group Server. The new StrongARM and Red Hat-based box is aimed at departmental workgroups and small businesses, and is priced between $979 and $1,839. The entry level model is a diskless machine with 32 megabytes RAM, and pricing is $1,339, $1,629 and $1,839 for 2, 4 and 6 gigabyte hard disk respectively. The machines come with a full suit of Internet/intranet services, including Web publishing, Common Gateway Interface, Perl scripting, HTML page authoring, email services, and public and private threaded discussion, allowing workgroup communication and collaboration. They also have document indexing, searching and management facilities, and support cross-platform file sharing and transfer between the NetWinder and NT, Windows 95 and Apple platforms. The machines run a Corel-modified version of Red Hat 5.1 and a StrongARM SA-110 275MHz CPU. They include two Ethernet connections, Iomega, Zip and Imation support and 2 megabytes accelerated video. Sound facilities and onboard video capture and playback are also included. ®
The Register breaking news

MS attorney caught plying witness with Linux numbers

Microsoft's first witness for the defence collected a reprimand from the judge for talking out of class yesterday. Richard Schmalensee had suddenly come up with an estimate that there are something like 10 million Linux servers out there, having failed to mention this either in his written testimony or in earlier discussion. When puzzled DoJ attorney David Boies asked him where the number had come from, in that case, Schmalensee replied that he'd been passed it by Microsoft attorney David Heiner during a court recess. This is apparently how expensive academic economists conduct their research. But not, apparently, how Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson expects his courtroom to run. He issued an immediate reprimand instructing Microsoft attorneys not to discuss the case with witnesses. Schmalensee also ran into trouble over his definition of Microsoft's market, as it appears he has defined it one way in his evidence for one of the other cases, Microsoft versus Bristol. In the DoJ case it clearly suits Microsoft to try to establish the boundaries of its market as widely as possible, thus increasing the scope of possible competition and reducing the impression that Microsoft has a monopoly. In Bristol, Schmalensee argued that Microsoft's market could be narrowly defined. This difference in definition did however attract the judge's attention, and his sudden interest in other cases could be unhelpful for Microsoft. There's certainly some stuff in both the Caldera and Sun matters which could make unpleasant contributions to the DoJ trial. As regards the meat of the first cross examination sessions themselves, Schmalensee seems to have clutched onto Linux determinedly, but to have been eventually forced to concede that Microsoft had not had a serious OS competitor in 12 years. But, he said hopefully, in a year or two, Linux and/or BeOS really could be rivals. Honest. ® Complete Register trial coverage
The Register breaking news

Compaq goes back to school

Compaq has set its sights on the UK education market and plans to become a major player. The vendor said it would be working with 50 educational software vendors to grow its market share to 15 per cent by the end of 1999. It will offer products and services aimed at different types of educational establishment, and is working in line with the government’s objectives for the National Grid for Learning. Compaq has put together an educational team to work on the projects, three of whom are ex-teachers. David Heath, formally of Apple Computer, heads a team of five people based at Compaq’s Glasgow call centre. This group will increase to 25, Compaq said. To encourage resellers and independent software vendors to take up the Compaq educational challenge, the manufacturer is launching a channel accreditation programme. It will be specifically aimed at channel partners providing curriculum-based software. ®
The Register breaking news

Record sales for AMD but analysts disappointed

AMD failed to live up to analysts’ expectations, despite record sales growth during the fourth quarter of its financial year, ending 27 December. Sales were up 16 per cent on the previous quarter to $788.8 million, which was less than the $800 million Wall Street had anticipated. Q4 97 saw AMD record sales of $613.1 million - making Q4 98 an increase of 29 per cent year-on-year. Q4 98 profit stood at $22.3 million, the same quarter last year saw AMD record a loss of $12.3 million. For the full year, AMD saw sales increase by eight per cent to $2.54 billion, which resulted in a net loss of $103.9 million. In 1997 sales were $2.3 billion, with a net loss of $21 million. AMD shipped more than 13.5 million processors from the AMD-K6 family, more than 8.5 million of which were K6-2 chips. The company claims that 16 per cent of all Windows-based PCs contain an AMD chip, with this proportion growing to 38 per cent of sub-$1,000 PCs. ®
The Register breaking news

‘Make people use Explorer’ – Gates email

More smoking emails poured out of the DoJ late last night, reopening the debate over when Microsoft decided to integrate IE, and why. And one of the most damaging is from Bill Gates himself. As late as February 1997 Gates was writing to Jim Allchin and Paul Maritz saying: "It seems clear that it will be very hard to increase browser market share on the merits of IE alone. It will be more important to leverage the OS to make people use IE instead of Navigator." It’s difficult to figure out what Gates might have meant by this without arriving at damaging conclusions. Microsoft last summer began claiming that it had been its intention to integrate IE in the OS from 1994 onwards, and in early 1997 development of Windows 98 was well under way. Microsoft had announced an integrationist strategy shortly after the launch of Windows 95, the plan being to achieve integration with IE 4.0. At the time Gates was writing Explorer 4.0 was due - it was originally planned for Q1 1997, but in fact slipped until October. So in February of that year Gates had made the statement of strategic direction, and if - as Microsoft says now - the integration plans had actually been signed, sealed and delivered for some years, what was he debating? And how could Microsoft "make people use IE instead of Navigator," if not on the merits of the product? The logical conclusion would seem to be that it could only do so by restricting Navigator’s distribution channels, and by making it harder for Navigator to work with Windows. Microsoft of course says it doesn’t do that, so we’re left still wondering what Gates is on about, aren’t we? Other emails suggest that the final decision to put IE and Windows 98 into the same product hadn’t yet been made in early 97. Writing in March of that year Kumar Mehta says: "If we take IE away from the OS most users [i.e. users of Navigator] will never switch to us." As Microsoft had already said it was going to put IE into the OS, this email and Gates’ make it pretty clear that there was a move within Microsoft to go with a less integrated strategy after all. Why would it be considering this? Pressure from OEMs might have been a factor, and note that other internal documentation that’s come up in the past reveals real fear on Microsoft’s part that there might be some form of Compaq or Intel led OEM revolt. So in 97, maybe some execs were worried about pushing to hard, too fast. ® Complete Register trial coverage
The Register breaking news

Apple chalks up $123 million Q1 profit

Apple has posted its fifth consecutive profitable quarter, as promised by interim CEO Steve Jobs at last week's MacWorld Expo keynote. As anticipated (see Apple set to announce $1.7 billion Q1 revenue), the Mac maker recorded first quarter of fiscal 1999 revenues of $1.7 billion, up eight per cent on the same period a year ago. Profits were higher than expected, reaching $152 million -- 95c a share. For Q1 1998, Apple recorded a profit of just $47 million. However, the latest figure includes $29 million made by offloading some 2.9 million of the shares Apple holds in ARM. Take that out of the equation, and Apple made $123 million -- at 78c a share, that's rather closer to the 70c a share Wall Street was expecting the company to declare. Apple also reported that it sold 519,000 iMacs during the quarter, a significant proportion of the 800,000-odd it shipped since the consumer computer was launched on 15 August. Clearly the company's Christmas extended advertising campaign and $29.99/£29.99-a-month iMac hire purchase scheme have paid off. So too has Jobs' policy of keeping inventory to a bare minimum. The company reported the quarter saw inventory drop to $25 million, or two days' worth of kit. That's five days' fewer machines than Dell's previously industry-leading five days inventory, claimed Jobs. The iMac sales contributed heavily to a year-on-year growth in unit shipments of 49 per cent, which Apple claimed was three to four times the industry average. ®
The Register breaking news

NT fails US government crypto tests

Major cryptographic shortcomings in NT 4.0 have forced Microsoft to engage in major surgery on the product, according to Web news service Network World . In a story earlier this week Network World revealed that NT 4.0 had failed US government cryptography tests. In order to be sold to the US and Canadian governments products have to pass the Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) 140-1 certification test. NT failed, and the testing revealed problems in NT’s cryptographic processing. Microsoft is preparing a fix pack for release this quarter, but application of this will probably result in users being able to run IE 4.0, Outlook 98 and various other applications in FIPS mode. IE 5.0 will know how to deal with FIPS, but it seems to be a moving target for Microsoft. Humorously, Netscape Communicator has passed FIPS 140-1. According to Network World the problems are related to NT 4.0’s CryptoAPIs and were uncovered at government-certified testing lab CygnaCom. Service Pack 4, which was released relatively recently, was intended to be the last fixpack for NT 4.0, but if you’re in the US government, it looks like you’re going to have to deal with Service Pack 5 after all... ®
The Register breaking news

India issues red alert against US security software

The Indian government looks set to forbid Indian banks and financial institutions from using US-developed network security software if the US government does not ease the restrictions it applies to the export of encryption technologies. The announcement was made by India's Central Vigilance Commissioner (CVC), N Vittal, after the country's Defence Research and Development Organisation's (DRDO) centre for artificial intelligence issued a 'red alert' against all network security software developed in the US. The alert warned that, because of the limits the US government places on the size of data encryption keys in exported applications, US software was too easy to hack and could thus prove a security hazard. "To put it bluntly, only insecure software can be exported. When various multinational companies go around peddling 'secure communication software' products to gullible Indian customers, the conveniently neglect to mention this aspect of US export law," said the DRDO in a letter to the CVC, quoted in Indian newspaper The Economic Times. The DRDO's centre for artificial intelligence also warned of the possibility that imported software products could contain technological time bombs designed to "cause havoc to the network when an external command is issued by a hostile nation". Of course, quite how seriously the DRDO takes such a threat is hard to determine, since its red alert letter appears to be as much about promoting its own, indigenously developed encryption software, which is due to me made available for testing in three months' time. "The encryption part of the software is complete and only the communication protocols remain to be written," reported the DRDO. "Since the software has been written by ourselves, there is no upper limit on the security level provided by encryption in the software exported from the USA." Which is, of course, the fundamental flaw with US encryption policy, despite the Department of Commerce's recent relaxation of some of the rules contained in that policy. If user can't get the level of security they want from US software, they'll go elsewhere for it. And India is less likely to limit the export of its own encryption products to other, unsavoury regimes -- though there's no guarantee they wouldn't include their own 'time bombs'... In the meantime, the CVC is expected to wait until the DRDO's own software is ready before issuing an official warning against US security software to India's banks. ®
The Register breaking news

Many-coloured iMacs upset dealers

Recent reports in some weekly IT papers here in the UK (squeal if you know who you are) have pointed out the nightmare scenario facing Mac dealers when deciding which of the colourful new iMacs to hold in stock. The Register is pleased to announce that it has come to the rescue of Mac dealers everywhere. Mac retailers and peripherals vendors aren't looking forward to the introduction of the colourful range of iMacs, squealed the latest edition of The Register’s favourite channel weekly. It will cause inventory problems, Mac dealers whinged, if we get lumbered with the unpopular colours or simply sell out of the popular ones. Choosing between blueberry, strawberry, tangerine, grape and lime could indeed be baffling. And as for matching colours for peripherals, well that will be a nightmare, whined others. The consequences for office furniture salesmen are too grim to even talk about here. So we shan’t. However, The Register can reveal that far from causing problems, this could be the start of a liberating experience for Mac users all over the world. We spoke to image consultants House of Colour to get to the truth behind this colourful story. "Dealers should experiment a bit and combine colours to create a look," said colour expert Sarah Whittaker from House of Colour. "They should mix and match colours just as they would if they were creating their own outfits," she said. So, Mac users needn't be colour shy after all. Consultants at House of Colour recommended that lime and tangerine go well together, as do blueberry and grape, both of which would create some exciting combinations. So, in the never-ending search for the Holy Grail of the channel - i.e a real value-add - Mac dealers may have hit upon a whole new revenue stream. As well as the usual hardware, software and a bit of training, maybe they could now offer colour therapy as well. ®
The Register breaking news

VAT-busters target business on the Web

UK companies trading on the Web but failing to declare VAT are being targeted by Customs and Excise officers using the Internet to track them down. The initiative has proved so successful in East Anglia -- where it's been up and running for the last year -- that it's likely to adopted nation-wide by all 14 regional Customs divisions by the autumn. Six companies in the Anglia Region -- which includes Essex and Norfolk -- have already been caught out and are currently being investigated by officials for alleged fraud and failure to pay VAT. More still have been passed on to other Customs divisions throughout the country as officials in East Anglia have unearthed Web-based companies on the make. "The good news is that the companies we've found are now registered for VAT and paying tax," said Caroline Benbrook, district manager of the Anglia Region. "Most of them were ghost traders, and the Internet was the only place we would have found them. If we didn't look there, they'd still be trading illegally now," she said. A hotel and a company selling car parts were among the businesses unearthed by officials. Common dodges include companies trading online that are not registered for VAT, but still charging customers VAT and pocketing the difference. Or companies which are not charging VAT in order to undercut a competitor. Customs officials will decide within the next six months whether the scheme should be rolled-out throughout the country but Benbrook is in no doubt that it should. "If we want to stop fraud and tax evasion, we have to keep up with the forefront of technology," she said. ®
The Register breaking news

Marimba prepares for IPO

Marimba, the once much-hyped Java push technology developer, is set to announce an initial public offering, according to sources quoted in US finance paper The Red Herring. The company is believed to be near to completing its IPO prospectus, though the size of the offering has yet to be set. Morgan Stanley and Hembrect & Quist are thought to be underwriting the stock issue. Formed in 1996 by a band of former Sun Java developers, Marimba quickly became Silicon Valley Flavour of the Month thanks to its clever Castanet push software and highly photogenic president CEO Kim Polese. Castanet differed from other push applications, such as PointCast, by delivering to users' desktops not information per se, but the Java applets that presented that data. The company was very quick to see wider uses for the technology beyond pushing news and horoscopes across the Web -- even in the early days, Polese was suggesting that Castanet could be used to deliver Java applications and updates to those applications across corporate networks, what it calls "application distribution and management". When push failed to take-off, Marimba changed its course to favour the corporate market, and has, over the last couple of years, avoided the limelight, done its damnedest to distance itself from all the early push technology hype and concentrated on building sales. Current customers include Compaq's Web subsidiary Alta Vista, Intuit, Ingram Micro, Seagate, Nortel, Bay Networks, Sun and the US DIY retail chain Home Depot. So far, Marimba has been funded to the tune of $18.5 million from venture capitalists, Wall Street investors and IT firms. ®
The Register breaking news

Analyst slams Softbank Yahoo! and ZD dealings

Internet stocks in general and those owned by Softbank in particular have come under savage fire from veteran US financial commentator Christopher Byron. Writing in his Back of the Envelope column in the NY Observer, Byron describes one such company, Ziff-Davis, as a "total basket case" and a "debt-bloated carcass." Byron is particularly interested in Yahoo! and in the proposed spin-off of ZD's Internet operations via a tracking stock IPO. He draws attention to the fact that Softbank Corporation of Japan owns stock in both ZD and Yahoo!, and suggests that "Ziff-Davis is dying so that Yahoo! might live." ZD IPOed last April, and Byron points out that the company took delivery of over $1.5 billion worth of debt as part of the process, while Softbank picked up a goodly wedge for the shares. "Here at Back of the Envelope," he says, "we took one look at the asset shuffle and predicted the company would soon be flat on its keester." And here it gets more interesting. In July Softbank spent $250 million on Yahoo! shares, and now has 30 per cent of the company. It also spent $400 million on shares in the E-Trade Group. E-Trade has since spent substantially on promotions via Yahoo!. Byron has also uncovered an SEC filing which says that in July-September Yahoo! advertising revenues from "Softbank and its related companies" grew from 4 per cent of net revenues to 8 per cent. Turning the screw further, Byron points out that Yahoo! beat analysts' earnings forecasts by 50 per cent, and that of the difference (5 cents a share), which totalled $5.2 million, $4.3 million was accounted for by that very revenue from Softbank. "Since the gross profit on ad revenues at Yahoo runs to about 90 percent and all the other business costs are pretty much fixed whether the ads come in or not, we may say with some confidence that, were it not for the Softbank revenues, Yahoo's actual third-quarter earnings would have been only 11 cents per share and not 15. The company would have beaten the Street's estimate by a mere penny per share. "That hyped-up trouncing of the Street's consensus forecast, announced on October 7, launched Yahoo's stock on its most explosive price surge ever, from $104 per share to more than $275 per share less than three months later. In fact, of course, nearly 100 percent of the run-up was fuelled by the most egregious sort of related-party transaction: Ad revenues supplied by a 30 percent shareholder of the company." And Ziff, "the debt-bloated carcass that provided the cash?" Byron says that in the company's latest quarterly filing it says that it expects, as of December 31, to be in violation of its loan covenants. Basically, it could end up defaulting. Byron points to the December 22 registration statement for the ZDNet tracking stock IPO, which says ZD intends to use the proceeds to pay off as much debt as possible. He's sceptical that this will work, to say the least: "This business - to be called ZDNet - looks exactly like the one it is being carved out of, only worse… What moron is going to pay anything for that!" Fortunately for Internet stocks everywhere, Byron reckons that the morons who've put their hands up for Web IPOs so far are quite likely to open their wallets yet again. ®
The Register breaking news

Oracle sets up fund to help Web developers of tomorrow

Oracle is setting up a $100 million venture capital fund to boost small business developing Web-based applications. The only snag being that companies interested in getting their hands on some of the filthy lucre have to doing their development work on Oracle 8i. The giant of the database world is planning to team up with established venture capital firms to spot the upcoming stars of tomorrow’s Internet industry. Companies working in ecommerce, content management and business intelligence will be likely candidates. Oracle CEO Larry Ellison said: "The next generation of business applications will be designed for and run on the Internet. Oracle plans to invest in and work closely with software companies that share this vision." Ellison obviously knows a good thing when he sees one and Oracle will be offering these fledgling partners access to its own developers and technology, hoping that by getting a raft of growing companies to work with Oracle it will sew-up the market in the future. ®
The Register breaking news

ATI reports record Q1 sales, profits

Graphics specialist ATI today reported record results for its first quarter of fiscal 1999. The company posted sales of $327.4 million, up 95 per cent on the same period last year, leading to profits of $52 million, a year-on-year increase of 112 per cent on the $24.5 million it made in Q1 1998. In fact, ATI's Q1 profits is closer to $50.1 million, thanks to costs deriving from the $70.9 million hit it's taking for the acquisition of PC-on-a-chip developer Chromatic Research. The company also warned it will be making further charges of $16 million for the next three quarters as a result of the purchase. That said, the outlook for ATI continues to appear very positive. ATI has always made most of its money from selling graphics acceleration chip-sets to PC manufacturers, rather than through the retail sale of graphics cards containing those chips. The massive growth in the 3D graphics add-in market over the last 18 months has encouraged more PC vendors to bundle sophisticated 3D technologies with their systems, and ATI has prospered accordingly, largely thanks to its Rage Pro and Rage Pro Turbo accelerators which brought the performance of the company's product line much closer to the leading retail add-ins. The Rage 128, which began shipping in volume at the beginning of the year and offers superior performance to 3Dfx's Voodoo 2, will extend that further. Apple is already shipping Rage 128 cards with every model in its professional Power Mac line. Rage Pro Turbo chip-sets drive the iMac and systems from Sun, Compaq, Dell, HP, NEC and Packard-Bell. ATI is also pushing its Rage Mobility notebook graphics acceleration range hard. Still, 3Dfx remains a potential trouble-maker, thanks to its dominance of the 3D market and its acquisition of board-maker STB. With 3Dfx set to release its next-generation Voodoo3 chip-set in the second quarter of 1999 and target it at the high-end games enthusiast market (see 3Dfx announces next-generation Voodoo), that leaves it plenty of scope to target Voodoo 2 and Voodoo Banshee-based boards at STB's PC vendor customers -- many of whom are now ATI customers. With Voodoo stable in its role as the graphics standard against which other chip-sets are measured, 3Dfx is in a good position to win back many of the customers STB lost to ATI. ®
The Register breaking news

Chips are up for Acer

Acer Semiconductor has signed a five year cross-technology deal with Silicon Storage Technology (SST). Acer will manufacture SST products and SST will licence its patented SuperFlash technology to Acer. Manufacturing is not scheduled to begin until year 2000. SST will get royalty payments from Acer, who in return will be grateful for the revenue injection, the announcement coming only days after Acer said was postponing its planned share issue because of "unfavourable economic conditions." Acer’s semiconductor business was highlighted as a major drain on Acer’s resources. Stan Shih, Acer chairman and CEO, said: "We expect to benefit from this strategic relationship both as a supplier of wafer to SST and in our joint efforts to develop products that are uniquely suited for ACER's advanced system products." ®
The Register breaking news

Norway hacks off Net community

A 13-year-old boy from Inner Mongolia received a cuff around the ear and was grounded for a week after Chinese authorities discovered he had hacked his way into a private information network. Under Inner Mongolian law, the boy is too young to be prosecuted. But if he does it again after his next birthday -- after which time police will legally be able to nail the little urchin -- he should move to Norway, where a court has ruled that attempting to hack into a computer is not a crime. The decision -- which has left some industry pundits speechless -- is believed to be the first of a kind and arguably sets a troublesome legal precedent. The court ruled that if computers are hooked up to the Internet, their owners must expect that others may try to break into their systems. While the court said trying to hack wasn't a crime, it did conclude that breaking and entering did constitute a felony. As reported last month by The Register (see Norway legalises hacking), and just picked up AP, hackers in Norway are now free to search the Internet to identify areas where security is weak before passing on the information for others to use illegally. ®
The Register breaking news

Ascend shareholders attempt to nix Lucent deal

Four separate lawsuits were filed today with the Delaware Chancery Court. Their goal: to block the proposed $20 billion merger between Lucent and Ascend (see Lucent and Ascend tie the knot at last). The suits were filed by Ascend shareholders and allege that company's directors, many of them named in the suits as defendantsm, have failed in their responsibility as directors to maximise the value of the shareholders' stakes in the company. ®
The Register breaking news

Redundancy hits Elcom staff

Elcom Group has slashed around four per cent of UK jobs following the proposed merger of its two ecommerce subsidiaries. The US-owned reseller and ecommerce software house cut 24 jobs before today officially uniting subsidiaries elcom.com and Elcom Systems. The company said the redundancies were designed to put Elcom on a stronger footing, but that the merger was not the only reason behind the job cuts. Elcom, based in Slough, claimed there were no further plans for job cuts but warned that the UK IT industry would not escape from the overall slowing down of the economy. According to Elcom chairman Jim Rousou, the cuts were a one-off action needed to trim costs. Rousou told The Register: "This is something that will happen to a lot of companies. It’s good management in the face of recession to make sure our cost base is in shape for 1999." He said the cuts were not solely connected to today’s merger which combined Elcom Systems, the company’s existing e-commerce subsidiary, with elcom.com, formed in December. Through today’s merger elcom.com will take on the infrastructure and technology development areas of Elcom Systems. The e-commerce automated procurement technology will also be owned by elcom.com. ®
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German ISDN vendor eyes UK channel

AVM, the ISDN adapter and application software maker, is looking to recruit a network of resellers and a distributor to take on the UK market. The German-based manufacturer is looking for one broadline distributor and 30 to 40 dealers to sell AVM kit and hopes to have its revamped UK channel in place by the end of 1999. AVM is in talks with a handful of distributors, but refused to reveal names. It currently sells its high-end products solely through niche distributor SAS, based in Hounslow. AVM said ISDN line prices were no longer significantly higher in the UK than in the rest of Europe, so planned to set up the dealer programme in the second half of 1999. Kai Allais, AVM international sales director, said the introduction of BT Highway, which converts existing lines into ISDN, has made the service more affordable in the UK. He said AVM’s decision to set up the channel programme was a direct result of BT reducing prices in this area. In the first half of 1998, AVM had 15 per cent of the UK ISDN market. ®
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Microsoft appeals Java injunction

Microsoft has filed an appeal against the injunction granted against it in Sun's favour in November. In its filing today the company says that Judge Ronald White misapplied the law in granting the injunction. In court Microsoft had been arguing that its licensing agreement with Sun gave it the right to modify Java. Sun argued that Microsoft was in breach of its licence, and the judge came down on Sun's side on 17th November. Microsoft's initial response was to start shipping Sun code as well as its own, and give users the choice of which one they used. But it wasn't as simple as that. Last month Microsoft asked for clarification of the terms of the injunction (Earlier story), and there was the small matter of passing Sun's Java compliance tests. If the route Microsoft was taking in December was clearly in compliance with the terms of the injunction then Microsoft was in the clear, but it seems certain that this approach didn't go far enough. If Microsoft hadn't appealed, it would therefore have needed to perform more seriously radical surgery to its Java strategy within the 90 days the injunction allowed, i.e. by mid-February. The company is currently appealing on the basis that Judge White was applying copyright law when he should have been applying contract law, and that Sun did not show Microsoft wilfully violated the agreement. ® Complete Register trial coverage