3rd > January > 1999 Archive

Updated: AMD slashes prices as Intel introduces faster Celerons

Intel officially introduced its 366MHz and 400MHz Celerons yesterday but AMD has taken retaliatory action over the holiday period and has slashed the price of its K6-2/400 by $60. Over the last two weeks, AMD has briefed its distributors and dealers about the price drop, which is intended to take the wind out of Intel's sales. The public clash between Intel and AMD hides a bitter battle behind the scenes. As exclusively reported here at the beginning of December, Intel dropped the prices of its 300MHz and 333MHz Celerons in a bid to shift inventory and prepare the market for the January price war. Cyrix and some distributors made the claim that Intel was dumping its stock of Slot One Celerons as it prepared to push Socket 370 processors into the marketplace. The pricing of the AMD K6-2/400 now pits it against Intel's new introductions today. The Celeron 366MHz costs $123 while the 400MHz part will cost $158. The AMD K6-2/400 now costs around $175 while the K6-2/350 is around $100. The lower speed Celerons, the 300A and the 333MHz parts, drop in price to $71 and $90 respectively. Intel also cut prices on its 350MHz and 400MHz parts by five and six per cent respectively to $202 and $353. AMD's argument will be that the K6-2/400 is a far more powerful processor than any of the Celeron parts but we at The Register confidently expect a phone call from spin doctors at Intel tomorrow to rebut that. Just before the Yule period, AMD claimed it would, at some point, resist Intel price pressure during this year. Later this quarter it will release a K6-2/450 part and in February will achieve volume of its K6-3 (Sharptooth) part. All prices are approximate but usually refer to chips sold in quantities of 1,000. Both Intel and AMD salesfolk have been known to vary these prices...depending on the order. ®
Mike Magee, 03 Jan 1999
Kids on wall. Pic: US Army/Capt Emily Skolozynski

What's Digital Anvil up to?

Two Comdexes ago, Dana Krelle, the charismatic VP poached from Nexgen, told The Register why it had taken a share in Digital Anvil and how AMD had the DirectX code before anyone else. We listened dutifully, and then were surprised a little last Spring when Microsoft announced it had taken some equity in the company too. We have assiduously followed the tracks of AMD, Microsoft -- and Compaq too -- for many years and think there's more to this than meets the eye. Compaq, for example, had a share in Nexgen. But then Nexgen was bought by AMD. Eckhard Pfeiffer, the CEO of Compaq, has always secretly favoured AMD after the infamous bustup with Intel he had at an Etre conference, exclusively reported here in The Register No. 5.
Eva Glass, 03 Jan 1999

Intel has communist connections

It's little wonder that in Gulf War II, the US forces targeted Intel's HQ in Baghdad (passim). It now transpires that Intel Celeron is now a phrase gravid with anagrams. For example, not only do we have Electro Lenin, but to show there will be no whitewash in the sepulchre, we also have Electro Linen. However, Encore Lentil is our favourite, while Elect Lenin Or... seems a trifle imperative for our liking. Citroen Ellen has a nice French feel to it, while Clone Lie Rent seems a little harsh.
Clara Marx, 03 Jan 1999

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017