EMC now spruiking PCs and thin clients, not Compellent

The deal's not done but EMC events are already full of chat about Dell products

The Dell/EMC transaction's yet to formally conclude, but the two companies are already starting to behave as one if the agenda for a forthcoming EMC event is any guide.

The Register was yesterday invited to the Australian iteration of of the EMC Forum, the single-day event at which the company talks up its latest and greatest. The agenda makes for interesting reading because alongside talks about EMC products and the things they enable are sessions like “10 reasons IT shouldn’t manage and secure desktops.”

The blurb for the session explains “If you’re not using thin clients on the edge of the network, you’re unnecessarily wasting OPEX on management and exposing your network to breach” and promises to reveal “how today’s thin clients offer the ultimate in data protection in a secure, managed and reliable way for any use case.”

Dell sells thin clients. EMC makes SANs that support desktop virtualisation. It's hard to imagine the latter company caring about offering such a session without its soon-to-be-owner's polite involvement.

EMC doesn't make PCs. Yet the forum offers a session titled “Improve productivity with modernised PCs and Windows10” in which you'll learn how new PCs are – knock us over with a feather – rather better than older machines and how “Windows 10 help employees work faster, smarter, with less maintenance issues and from anywhere”.

You'll also be offered the chance to “hear best practices from Dell experts on how to seamlessly navigate a migration to Windows 10”.

Another talk is titled "Understanding server technology trends, workload impacts, and the Dell Point of View".

There's plenty of storage-centric EMC content at the event too, none of which mentions Compellent.

Which is probably polite: it's one thing to find time for non-competing products and another entirely to point out overlaps in the combined product portfolio.

Whatever the rationale behind the agenda, it appears that even on the fringes of the respective Dell/EMC empires, the two companies are already talking congenially. Or perhaps there are some EMC presenters mightily peeved at being booted from speaking slots they hoped would spur local sales for their specialist wares. If you're one of them, feel free to leak and/or vent. ®


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