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Satya Nadella's $84.3m pay packet: Did he use the 'female superpower' to get it?

He can get some Satya's-faction

Satya Nadella famously told women to not bother asking for pay rises, which now looks a bit rich after Microsoft revealed his $83.4m pay packet.

After all, what would you know about asking for a raise when your pay packet is more already than the combined wages of 800 Microsoft minions?

Redmond announced its great leader's mammoth settlement in a new SEC filing.

The new CEO was handed a basic wage of $918,917 for the fiscal year which ended in June, as well as a $3.6m bonus. On top of all this, he also trousered $79.8m worth of stocks.

So what did our humble hero do to deserve all this? Well, according to the filing, his job is "demanding, requiring mastery of complex, rapidly evolving business models and the ability to lead a highly technical organization".

"We conducted an exhaustive and thoughtful search, looking both externally and internally to identify the best possible individual to lead the Company into its next chapter of innovation and growth," Redmond continued. "With the appointment of Satya Nadella, we believe we fulfilled our goal, selecting the best candidate to bring the Company renewed and continued success."

Nadella is not exactly the most popular CEO in the world at the moment, after he insisted that not asking for a raise was a female "superpower".

"It's not really about asking for a raise, but knowing and having faith that the system will give you the right raise," he said.

According to the workplace reviews site Glassdoor, a Microsoft development engineer earns $111,942. Not a bad little pay packet, but paltry when compared to female-baiting overlord Nadella.

Although the huge disparity between worker and boss at Microsoft looks massive, it's actually lower than the American national average.

In the US last year, fatcat CEOs earned an average of $11.7m, which works out to 331 times the average miserable employee’s $35,293 salary.

So, about that revolution you were talking about... ®

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