Women! Worried you won't get that Job in IT? Mention how hot you are

'Don't hate me 'cos I'm beautiful' ploy for sad honeys

Woman looks immensely happy while staring into blank screen of unplugged monitor

Who says the fields of psychology and business studies produce nothing but worthless waffle? A top professor of psychobiz has solved one of the most pressing problems facing humanity today: that of the terrible discrimination faced by attractive women when they try to get jobs which are perceived as being traditionally masculine.

This discrimination was first discovered by Stefanie Johnson, professor of management and entrepreneurship*, a few years ago. It seems that attractive women struggle to gain employment in such traditionally-for-the-chaps job areas as security, hardware sales, engineering and - presumably - IT.

Now prof Johnson has returned with new research which has led to some words of advice for the downtrodden hot babe trapped in some dead end career like marketing or financial services.

We are told:

Belles can put the brakes on discrimination by acknowledging their looks during an interview, according to a new study ...

The paper, published in Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, is the first to provide a method for curtailing such prejudice against attractive women.

In the study, when an attractive woman applied for a job typically filled by men ... and said, “I know I don’t look like your typical applicant,” or “I know there aren’t a lot of women in this industry,” and pointed out successes on her resume, she received higher ratings from reviewers than counterparts who made no mention of their looks.

“Turns out there’s merit in the old Pantene ad, ‘Don’t hate me because I’m beautiful,’” says Stefanie Johnson. “If a sufferer of female-beauty stereotyping addresses the issue, the perpetrator leaves behind preconceived ideas and is able to more clearly see her professional qualities.”

So there you have it. If, as seems very likely, a large number of attractive women are reading this article and yearning for a chance to break through the glass door of female-beauty stereotyping and join our core readership in the traditionally male dominated world of IT, you now know how to achieve your dream.

Don't say we never do anything for you. ®

Bootnote

*Professor Johnson reached this eminence by way of early degrees in pschology and industrial/organisational psychology, followed by experience as Instructor of Management, professor of psychology and then professor of management.

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