Jesus phone RAISED from DEAD. Watch iPhone 6 get BURNED, DROWNED, SMASHED

Go on, fandroids, you're allowed to giggle

Vid Apple's latest iPhones are the toughest mobes ever made, if the results of a sadistic insurer's torture test are to be believed.

SquareTrade used a cruel robot to inflict all manner of pain on the two models of the iPhone 6, which can be bought in the normal size or as a well-endowed, ab-phab version with a 5.5-inch face.

The robots inflicted the two phones with various nasty treatments, including a drop test from four feet and a slide test, which is useful in assessing how far your mobe will scoot across a pub table.

The iPhones were also subjected to death by drowning, after being dunked in a tank of water for ten seconds.

All phones are given a rating out of 10, with 1 being the safest and 10 being a glass-jawed weakling of a mobe. The iPhone 6 achieved the best score ever seen in the tests, with a rating of 4, whereas the 6 Plus managed a 5 and the iPhone 5S a 6.

The Samsung Galaxy S5 managed only a 6.5 and drew particular criticism for its slipperiness, which could see it plunge off a table if given a sufficient nudge.

Video of iPhone 6s being abused by various destructive means.

The iPhone 6 Plus did not escape scot free, however, because it was the only mobe which did not survive the drop test. When it hit the deck, the phone's case separated from its glass screen, although both were intact.

All the phones seemed to survive the death by water test.

Obviously, an insurer can't be seen to do nothing but smash phones up. To counteract the general air of destruction, SquareTrade also commissioned research which found that Britons spent £4.6bn on repairing their phones over the past two years.

This is enough to buy about 7,431,340 unlocked basic models of the iPhone 6 Plus at Apple's £619 price, which means about one in nine Brits could have just bought a new top-of-the-range phone instead of repairing their own.

Who says the spirit of repair and reuse is dead in Blighty? ®

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