Feeds

NZ Justice Minister scalped as hacker leaks emails

Grab your popcorn: Subterfuge and slur disrupts election run up

Security for virtualized datacentres

A hacker has claimed the scalp of New Zealand Justice Minister Judith Collins by releasing information showing a purported campaign to undermine government officials.

The revelations, revealed last month, came from a hacker known as RawShark (@whaledump), who broke into the email account of conservative blogger Cameron Slater. It was claimed in the book Dirty Politics that New Zealand Prime Minister John Key helped release a Security Intelligence Service (NZSIS) document to Slater, whose WhaleOil blog was a purported smear wagon used by the Government.

Hacked emails indicated controversial financier Mark Hotchin paid Slater and fellow conservative blogger Cathy Odgers to write articles that attacked New Zealand's Serious Fraud Office director Adam Feeley and the Financial Markets Authority, which were investigating his company, Stuff.co.nz reported.

Odgers released her own "smoking gun" emails to Fairfax (the publishing company that owns Stuff.NZ), purportedly implicating Collins, who resigned over the allegations after being confronted by Key.

Collins said the allegations were "extremely distressing and disappointing", the paper reported.

New information from RawShark, published today by the NZ Herald, means that Collins could be drawn into a high-level inquiry over the intelligence information released to blogger Slater in an unusually swift Official Information Act (OIA) request.

The publication said it may indicate Slater received a possibly politically motivated tip off - which triggered the OIA request - that Phil Goff, Labour leader at the time, received information from the NZSIS about backpackers thought to be Israeli spies, contrary to his public claims.

It quoted a purported message from Collins concerning Labour's 2011 election prospects that she "can't imagine that they can find someone to take the fall for Phil. When Phil fails, will he then resign from Parliament so we can have a by-election so soon after the election? perhaps he should just go now and then we can save money on a by-election?".

Slater: "Well hopefully I will get my reply to my OIA on Monday. then we will see what happens."

Collins: "Oh dear. All this open government thingy."

Slater: "twewwible."

The hacker RawShark has kept any information about himself or even an alias off the public radar, saying only that he was happy to be considered a teenage hacktivist and claimed his unique motivations would mean he could be quickly caught if he slipped up. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
FYI: OS X Yosemite's Spotlight tells Apple EVERYTHING you're looking for
It's on by default – didn't you read the small print?
Edward who? GCHQ boss dodges Snowden topic during last speech
UK spies would rather 'walk' than do 'mass surveillance'
Microsoft pulls another dodgy patch
Redmond makes a hash of hashing add-on
NOT OK GOOGLE: Android images can conceal code
It's been fixed, but hordes won't have applied the upgrade
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
'LulzSec leader Aush0k' found to be naughty boy not worthy of jail
15 months home detention leaves egg on feds' faces as they grab for more power
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.