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Report: Sprint to bring Sony Xperia into tough US smartphone market

Could it soon be selling the Japenese giant's Z3 model?

Stateside mobile carrier Sprint is reportedly planning to bring the Sony Xperia handset to the US market for the first time.

The rumours come just a few weeks after Sprint's newly-installed boss Marcelo Claure said he planned to make aggressive moves to help the company regain market share.

Now, according to separate reports in the Wall Street Journal and Reuters, Sony's Xperia device is apparently set to be touted by Sprint in the US smartphone market.

The timing of such a gambit, Claure might say, is sublime given that Sony is expected to unleash its Xperia Z3 model at German consumer electronics tradefest IFA next week.

Apparently, if the Reuters report is accurate, Sprint parent company Softbank will sell the handset in Japan later this year.

US consumers can expect to get their mitts on a "soon-to-be launched Xperia flagship phone", the newswire - citing multiple sources - teased.

Meanwhile, an insider told the WSJ that Sprint hopes to beef up its smartphone lineup by offering more options to its customers in an effort to convince them to stick around for longer with the mobile operator in what is a tough US market. ®

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