Feeds

Microsoft boots 1,500 dodgy apps from the Windows Store

DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! Naughty, misleading developers!

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

Microsoft has turned 1,500 applications out of the Windows Store, the app bazaar for Windows 8 devices.

In a post titled How we’re addressing misleading apps in Windows Store, Microsoft explains it has conducted a promised spring clean by changing the rules for admission to the store and will henceforth insist on the following criteria:

  • Naming – to clearly and accurately reflect the functionality of the app.
  • Categories – to ensure apps are categorized according to the app function and purpose.
  • Icons – must be differentiated to avoid being mistaken with others.

The new rules apply to the Windows Store and the Windows Phone Store.

Most developers, Redmond says, play nice and don't fall foul of the regulations.

Some rogue devs not only do the wrong thing, but don't reply to Redmond's emails asking them to play nicely. Some 1,500 apps penned by such devs have therefore been tossed out of the Windows Store. Punters who bought them mistakenly can even score a refund.

“The Store review is ongoing and we recognize that we have more work to do,” Microsoft says, “but we’re on it. We’re applying additional resources to speed up the review process and identify more problem apps faster.”

Why the review? Microsoft had a problem. As the post states, “Earlier this year we heard loud and clear that people were finding it more difficult to find the apps they were searching for; often having to sort through lists of apps with confusing or misleading titles.”

There's another problem here, too, because having spent years telling its army of devs that apps are their ticket to riches the reality is that Microsoft's stores aren't providing a great user experience.

With Windows 8 failing to set the world afire and Windows Phone's market share in single figures around the world, Microsoft clearly needs to clear out its stores before they are ever to become a reason to adopt its platforms. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
UNIX greybeards threaten Debian fork over systemd plan
'Veteran Unix Admins' fear desktop emphasis is betraying open source
Netscape Navigator - the browser that started it all - turns 20
It was 20 years ago today, Marc Andreeesen taught the band to play
Redmond top man Satya Nadella: 'Microsoft LOVES Linux'
Open-source 'love' fairly runneth over at cloud event
Chrome 38's new HTML tag support makes fatties FIT and SKINNIER
First browser to protect networks' bandwith using official spec
Admins! Never mind POODLE, there're NEW OpenSSL bugs to splat
Four new patches for open-source crypto libraries
Torvalds CONFESSES: 'I'm pretty good at alienating devs'
Admits to 'a metric ****load' of mistakes during work with Linux collaborators
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.