Feeds

iPhone owners EARN MORE THAN YOU, says mobile report

Fanbois make medico money, Fandroids earn like lesser boffins

Intelligent flash storage arrays

The average iPhone app fanboi makes nearly double the mean US annual salary.

So says research firm comScore, which claimed in its most recent mobile app report that owners of the gilded fruitphone pull 40 per cent more money on average than their Android-owning counterparts.

According to the company, iPhone users haul and average US$85,000 through the door, compared to an average Android user making $61,000 in the time it takes for Earth to go around the Sun. The annual mean wage for all US occupations was $46,440 according to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

Based on Bureau of Labor Statistics figures from 2013, the average iPhone salary would be in the range of those made by, among others, systems analysts, civil engineers, physical scientists and postsecondary political science teachers.

Android owners, meanwhile, fall in line with the pay grades of anthropologists, criminal justice professors and sales representatives.

The study also found that those moneybags iPhone owners spend more time fondling their phones, averaging nine hours per month more than Android owners. iPhone users also tend to be younger, with 43 per cent in the 18-34 age segment compared to 39 per cent for Android.

Usage figures, however, may be skewed by a few heavy users. comScore noted that just 7 per cent of users were responsible for nearly half of the app download traffic it recorded. The company estimates that just one third of smartphone owners download new apps at a rate of at least one per month.

Facebook was by far the most popular mobile app in the US, with comScore logging more than 115 million unique visitors over the three-month period ending June. YouTube was second with 83.39 million, followed by Google Play (72.24 million) and Google Search (70.1 million).

While the growth of the mobile space has been credited with helping cause a sharp dip in PC sales, users are not abandoning their desktops in favor of smartphones, say researchers.

The study also found that desktop browsing and mobile browsing are not mutually exclusive and while mobile usage has grown 52 per cent over the past year, desktop browsing has held steady with a one per cent growth rate. ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
Nexus 7 fandroids tell of salty taste after sucking on Google's Lollipop
Web giant looking into why version 5.0 of Android is crippling older slabs
Heyyy! NICE e-bracelet you've got there ... SHAME if someone were to SUBPOENA it
Court pops open cans of worms and whup-ass in Fitbit case
SLURP! Flick your TONGUE around our LOLLIPOP – Google
Android 5 is coming – IF you're lucky enough to have the right gadget
Official: European members prefer to fondle Apple iPads
Only 7 of 50 parliamentarians plump for Samsung Galaxy S
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
Space Commanders rebel as Elite:Dangerous kills offline mode
Frontier cops an epic kicking in its own forums ahead of December revival
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Reducing the cost and complexity of web vulnerability management
How using vulnerability assessments to identify exploitable weaknesses and take corrective action can reduce the risk of hackers finding your site and attacking it.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.