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Drunkards warned: If you can't walk in a straight line, don't shop online, you fool!

Put it away boys. Cover them up ladies. Your credit cards, we mean

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

One in four Brits have admitted to splurging too much cash during drunken shopping sprees online, according to a new survey.

Insurance website Confused.com commissioned a research outfit to quiz 2,000 people in the UK about their booze-charged spending habits on the interwebs.

The survey found some 24 per cent of the good folk of old Albion admit caning their credit card when in drink, flashing the plastic in "bars, clubs or cyberspace".

Some 19 per cent have gone online to blow their, erm, cash, with one in 10 of these wanton web shoppers using a credit card to fund their purchases.

About a quarter of respondents admit to spending between £100 and £200 online when drunk, with 4 per cent of respondents confessing to splurging more than £500 when intoxicated.

“People need to exercise caution when spending. Alcohol can cause people’s inhibitions to disappear but people need to be aware of how their credit card spending when drunk could affect them in the long run," said head of credit cards at Confused.com Nerys Lewis.

“Managing a credit limit is vital for consumers to safe-guard against future lending and any decisions made to spend on credit cards when drunk need to [be] made with full thought behind them. Whilst people may wake up the next day and have a good laugh about the purchase they’ve made when drunk, these purchases could cause problems further down the line.”

Clothes are the most popular item for boozed-up online shoppers, with 36 per cent of those surveyed admitting to buying new garms. Other common purchases include DVDs and CDs (23 per cent) and - perhaps more alarmingly - holidays, with 18 per cent of drunkards 'fessing up to such purchases.

Confused.com highlighted some of the more ridiculous items bought by the respondents while pissed. That said, the purchases may appear perfectly sensible to any sartorially-aware, short-statured fisherman hoping for a spot on The Great British Bake Off.

1. Ten Lobster Pots

2. A pie maker from a shopping channel

3. Diving Equipment

4. A folding ladder

5. A washing machine

6. A cuddly toy*

What do you think? What fishy things did you buy with your card when you were last off your chops? ®

* Yes, we added the fluffy bear.

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