Feeds

Brit infosec firm lets hackers think they've stolen something

ClearSwift has scored an almost-accidental success with [REDACTED] tech

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Security strategies generally concentrate on keeping the bad guys out, but British security outfit ClearSwift has stumbled upon another approach: if the bad guys get in, let them out with something. But scrub it clean on the way out the door.

ClearSwift is the latest home for content-screening technologies first developed in the mid-90s by Content Technologies, which made hay when organisations like law firms that were adopting email figured out it wasn't a good idea for confidential files to fly out of their buildings as attachments.

Content security, these days often referred to as data loss prevention (DLP), has been around ever since but has often made its way into security packages as a feature. ClearSwift's CEO Heath Davies would rather than weren't the case but is pragmatic enough to build links between his products and others from the likes of BlueCoat to help those who want one management console to rule them all so that ClearSwift isn't pigeon-holed as a point solution.

The company's also innovating, and with a new technique called “adaptive redaction” seems to have hit on something interesting.

As the name suggests, adaptive redaction scrubs sensitive data. The “adaptive” part refers to the fact that when ClearSwift's products spot content heading out the door it will let it go on its merry way … once it has been fuzzed into something that in no way resembles the original and contains nothing of use. The redaction happens as a result of policies that describe data forbidden to go beyond he firewall. When those policies are triggered, the company's wares wipe document data and metadata. Logs then offer some insight into what just happened.

Davies says that since adaptive redaction's introduction in late 2013, it has handily outsold ClearSwift's core products. The technology is therefore an important part of his plans to double the company's revenue in coming years.

The channel will help, too. By 2017 Davies expects all sales will come from partners, a tactic he expects will fuel expansion around the world. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
FYI: OS X Yosemite's Spotlight tells Apple EVERYTHING you're looking for
It's on by default – didn't you read the small print?
Russian hackers exploit 'Sandworm' bug 'to spy on NATO, EU PCs'
Fix imminent from Microsoft for Vista, Server 2008, other stuff
Edward who? GCHQ boss dodges Snowden topic during last speech
UK spies would rather 'walk' than do 'mass surveillance'
Microsoft pulls another dodgy patch
Redmond makes a hash of hashing add-on
NOT OK GOOGLE: Android images can conceal code
It's been fixed, but hordes won't have applied the upgrade
Apple grapple: Congress kills FBI's Cupertino crypto kybosh plan
Encryption would lead us all into a 'dark place', claim G-Men
'LulzSec leader Aush0k' found to be naughty boy not worthy of jail
15 months home detention leaves egg on feds' faces as they grab for more power
China is ALREADY spying on Apple iCloud users, claims watchdog
Attack harvests users' info at iPhone 6 launch
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.