Feeds

Another step forward for diamond-based quantum computers

Square cut or pear-shaped, these qubits don't lose their shape

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Building simple quantum gates is common, but creating something that could be built on transistor-like scale is a huge challenge. Now, boffins from the Technical University of Vienna, Japan's National Institute of Informatics, and NTT's Basic Research Labs are offering an architecture they reckon can be scaled up.

What the researchers are offering, they believe, is a basic architecture they think would support a scalable quantum computer based on spins of nitrogen atoms in diamonds.

The architecture uses nitrogen atoms that can occupy two spin states, injected into a diamond, with each nitrogen defect trapped in a two-mirror optical resonator. Optical fibres let the engineers couple photons to this quantum system, allowing them to work with it without destroying the nitrogen atom spins.

As the researchers write in their paper at Physical Review X, “Modules are connected by photons propagating in a fiber-optical network. The cavities mediate interactions between the photons and the electron spins, enabling entanglement distribution and readout. The electron spins are coupled to nuclear spins, which constitute long-lived quantum memories where quantum information is stored and processed”.

Individual systems can then be connected together in an error-resistant two-dimensional array, the researchers say. Around 4.5 billion individual qubits would be required to run Shor's prime-factoring quantum computing algorithm on a 2048-bit prime, they add, but this architecture offers the potential for its individual elements to be miniaturised.

A quantum-diamond experimental chip at TU Vienna

TU Vienna is already experimenting with nitrogen-in-diamond quantum chips. Image: TU Vienna

TU Vienna's announcement is here.

Last year, UC Santa Barbara researchers demonstrated controlling a nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond using photons. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Ex-Soviet engines fingered after Antares ROCKET launch BLAST
Speculation rife, but Orbital claims it's too early to tell
Voyager 1 now EIGHTEEN LIGHT HOURS from home
Almost 20 BEEELION kilometres from Sol
MEN: For pity's sake SLEEP with LOTS of WOMEN - and avoid Prostate Cancer
And, um, don't sleep with other men. If that's what worries you
Jim Beam me up, Scotty! WHISKY from SPAAACE returns to Earth
They're insured for $1m, before you thirsty folks make plans
ROGUE SAIL BOAT blocks SPACE STATION PODULE blastoff
Er, we think our ISS launch beats your fishing expedition
NASA: Spacecraft crash site FOUND ON MOON RIM
'What fun!' exlaims NASA boffin who found the LADEE
BAE points electromagnetic projectile at US Army
Railguns for 'Future fighting vehicle'
OK Google, do I have CANCER?
Company talks up pill that would spot developing tumors
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.
Mitigating web security risk with SSL certificates
Web-based systems are essential tools for running business processes and delivering services to customers.