Feeds

2,285,295 Aussie logins nabbed in Russian password haul

Thousands of .au sites p0wned and thrown to the winds

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More than two million unique login credentials for Australian internet users were stolen as part of the massive haul of 1.2 billion passwords by a Russian hacker outfit.

Earlier this month Hold Security reported that Russian hackers under the group dubbed CyberVors amassed the largest ever cache of stolen website passwords through automated and botnet-driven SQL injection attacks against horribly insecure websites.

The hackers reportedly amassed a staggering 4.5 billion username and password combinations including many duplicates, or 1.2 billion unique pairs.

Of these, 2,285,295 compromised accounts related to email addresses ending in '.com.au' and included corresponding passwords, Alex Hold told The Register.

At least 5929 Australian '.com.au' websites were found in the hacker haul which were either exploited or vulnerable to exploitation via SQL injection.

Those numbers could be higher if other suffixes such as '.net.au' were included. This would catch mail accounts from Australia's two biggest internet providers BigPond and iiNet, among others.

The figures could grow further still since other popular email accounts such as Google's Gmail and Microsoft's Hotmail (one of this reporter's less-significant passwords was nabbed in the breach) did not indicate the location of users by top level domains, and notoriously insecure government websites were omitted.

Hold declined to name or provide further descriptions of the hacked websites, such as country of origin or verticals, which ranged from small businesses to large household name organisations. He was contacting some of the affected website owners to alert them of the compromise.

The intelligence bod has, like others in his field, established tendrils throughout private cybercrime websites to monitor for breaches and exploits.

He most famously revealed the huge Adobe breach in October last year that affected some 38 million users.

Hold came under fire for launching a $120 a month breach-notification service the same day news of the Russian hack broke. In a post Hold said the service was not pitched at individual users but to organisations wanting to protect their sites. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
SMASH the Bash bug! Apple and Red Hat scramble for patch batches
'Applying multiple security updates is extremely difficult'
Shellshock: 'Larger scale attack' on its way, warn securo-bods
Not just web servers under threat - though TENS of THOUSANDS have been hit
Apple's new iPhone 6 vulnerable to last year's TouchID fingerprint hack
But unsophisticated thieves need not attempt this trick
Hackers thrash Bash Shellshock bug: World races to cover hole
Update your gear now to avoid early attacks hitting the web
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Who.is does the Harlem Shake
Blame it on LOLing XSS terroristas
Researchers tell black hats: 'YOU'RE SOOO PREDICTABLE'
Want to register that domain? We're way ahead of you.
Stunned by Shellshock Bash bug? Patch all you can – or be punished
UK data watchdog rolls up its sleeves, polishes truncheon
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.