Feeds

Multiple user accounts coming to Android phones 'n' slabs

Someone's thought of the children, but perhaps not of Samsung, VMware and Citrix

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

It looks like user accounts are coming to Android.

This thread in the Android developer preview mailing list includes a post in which a user asks (with spelling and punctuation anomalies) for something like this:

Tablets are able to have multiple accounts for multiple users, allowing the users to install an app only for themselfes . Storage space of phones is growing, 32GB or even 64GB. For example, some families are sharing their phones with their kids for gaming. On a tablet, you can set up an account for your kids and restrict the access on your own apps. My idea is to enable the multi-user feature on phone type devices, with adding an extra restricted account type for kids.

Parents can select wether they enable Play Store access or not. Also, it should be selectable if the child user is allowed to have a Google account or not. A childs Google account should have a age restriction for Google apps and the Play Store (optional). Parents can select what types of apps their child can install, and the Child's Google account should be unable to create a G+ profile until it is old enough (optional).

That suggestion prompts a response from an Android development project team member to the effect that “The development team has implemented this feature and it will be available as a part of the next public build.”

Accounts with different levels of user privilege are a time-honoured way of controlling the resources users can access, so there's nothing new in this feature coming to Android.

Yet the absence of user accounts in Android has, perversely, turned into opportunity for others. Samsung's Knox, Citrix's Receiver and various bits of VMware's Horizon range make it possible to wall off bits of a phone so that BYOD devices can offer better-secured zones from within which corporate enterprise applications can connect to sensitive business data.

The Android accounts arrangements described above aren't a threat to those efforts. Yet.

Android users can therefore look forward to some nice new ways to work with their devices. And vendors with an interest in securing BYOD Androids can look forward to some interesting meetings about Google's future intentions. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
George Clooney, WikiLeaks' lawyer wife hand out burner phones to wedding guests
Day 4: 'News'-papers STILL rammed with Clooney nuptials
iPAD-FONDLING fanboi sparks SECURITY ALERT at Sydney airport
Breaches screening rules cos Apple SCREEN ROOLZ, ok?
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Apple's new iPhone 6 vulnerable to last year's TouchID fingerprint hack
But unsophisticated thieves need not attempt this trick
The British Museum plonks digital bricks on world of Minecraft
Institution confirms it's cool with joining the blocky universe
How the FLAC do I tell MP3s from lossless audio?
Can you hear the difference? Can anyone?
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.