Feeds

Oracle cluster daddy jumps ship to NoSQL upstart MongoDB

30-year SQL veteran says firm is 'revolutionizing' databases

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Roger Bamford, a pioneering database engineer who spent 30 years at SQL stalwart Oracle, has jumped over to the NoSQL side and landed in a new job at MongoDB.

Bamford joins the seven-year-old startup with the title of distinguished engineer and will be part of the senior engineering team that develops the MongoDB database.

"There is a brand new generation of databases being built and deployed to address today's data challenges," Bamford said in a canned quote. "I've witnessed the explosive adoption of MongoDB over the past few years and I'm excited to be part of the team that is revolutionizing how organizations build, manage and run applications."

Whether Bamford will have a particular area of focus in his new role is not clear, but he is perhaps best known as the "founding father" of Oracle Real Application Clusters (RAC), the high-availability option for the Oracle RDMS that has become a key component of the company's private cloud architecture.

More recently, he led the database giant's advanced R&D team for distributed and parallel computing, in addition to providing overall architectural leadership for the Oracle Database.

Before Oracle, Bamford worked at IBM Research, having completed a baccalaureate degree in computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a master's degree in electrical engineering from Stanford University. He personally holds more than 40 patents on database technologies.

His defection could be a major coup for MongoDB, which has been gaining significant traction as developers look to alternatives to traditional SQL databases for their Big Data projects. According to DB-Engines analytics database, MongoDB is the most popular non-relational data store, based on web buzz.

Major tech firms have taken notice of the firm, too. In MongoDB's most recent $150m funding round, it picked up Intel Capital, Red Hat, and Salesforce.com as new investors. IBM also offers direct support for MongoDB's custom query language on its DB2 database.

Oracle, meanwhile, has shown little love for MongoDB so far. Instead, it has been bolting NoSQL-like query capabilities onto MySQL while also offering products that allow developers to query NoSQL databases using Oracle's PL/SQL dialect – a hybrid strategy that it has termed "Not Only SQL."

"People are going to want to have both," Oracle VP of MySQL engineering Thomas Ulin told The Reg at last year's Oracle OpenWorld conference.

Having gained Bamford's massive database engineering experience, however, MongoDB may soon be in a position to offer customers just that. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
It's Big, it's Blue... it's simply FABLESS! IBM's chip-free future
Or why the reversal of globalisation ain't gonna 'appen
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Microsoft and Dell’s cloud in a box: Instant Azure for the data centre
A less painful way to run Microsoft’s private cloud
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
Windows 10: Forget Cloudobile, put Security and Privacy First
But - dammit - It would be insane to say 'don't collect, because NSA'
CAGE MATCH: Microsoft, Dell open co-located bit barns in Oz
Whole new species of XaaS spawning in the antipodes
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.