Feeds

Only '3% of web servers in top corps' fully fixed after Heartbleed snafu

Just slapping a patched OpenSSL on a machine ain't going to cut it, we're told

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

A study of the public-facing web servers run by some of the world's largest firms has suggested only three per cent of the machines have been fully protected against the OpenSSL vulnerability known as Heartbleed.

The research, carried out by security specialists at Venafi Labs, examined 550,000 servers belonging to 1,639 companies on the Forbes top Global 2000 list, and showed that 99 per cent of the companies checked had patched the data-leaking Heartbleed flaw.

But, Venafi tells us, only 15,000 of the patched servers have changed their private keys, and as well as being issued with new SSL certificates and having the old ones revoked. Given that Heartbleed can be exploited to snaffle private keys out of a vulnerable computer's memory, it should be assumed the server keys and certs have been compromised, we're told.

"Mopping up after an incident isn't as simple as it used to be," Kevin Bocek, VP of security strategy and threat intelligence at Venafi, told The Register. "You can't just stick a patch on and call it done."

He pointed out that the OpenSSL flaw had been exploitable for two years before it was finally spotted in April. During that time passwords were retrievable by those capable of exploiting the flaw, but so were encryption keys and certification data that could be used to masquerade as corporate servers.

Bocek said the situation was even worse in servers that aren't public facing, and in many cases servers residing inside corporate firewalls hadn't even been properly patched against the Heartbleed flaw.

In terms of the types of business that had fully patched against Heartbleed, the computer services sector unsurprisingly performed best, ahead of broadcasting firms, banks, and the semiconductor industry. ®

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
Knock Knock tool makes a joke of Mac AV
Yes, we know Macs 'don't get viruses', but when they do this code'll spot 'em
Feds seek potential 'second Snowden' gov doc leaker – report
Hang on, Ed wasn't here when we compiled THIS document
Why weasel words might not work for Whisper
CEO suspends editor but privacy questions remain
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
BlackEnergy crimeware coursing through US control systems
US CERT says three flavours of control kit are under attack
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.
Mitigating web security risk with SSL certificates
Web-based systems are essential tools for running business processes and delivering services to customers.