Feeds

SAP gets into OpenStack bed with... ORACLE? (and 100 others)

Splurges $25k to get a seat at the open-source cloud project's marketing table

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

SAP is preparing to work with arch-rival Oracle on developing open-source software that will benefit both companies' products.

This perplexing state of affairs was announced by SAP on Tuesday when it said it had become a "Corporate Sponsor" of the OpenStack Foundation to the tune of $25,000 a year. Oracle is also a sponsor, as are tens of other companies including Ubuntu, HP, IBM, Cisco, Yahoo!, and more.

OpenStack is a project founded by NASA and Rackspace in 2010 that aims to create software for spinning up, managing, and reselling data center services. The goal of the open-source project is to be as indispensable to large clusters of IT equipment as Linux distributions are to individual servers and the like.

Tellingly, neither Microsoft, Google or Amazon are involved in the project, as they operate proprietary systems that are by all accounts more advanced than OpenStack – and more lucrative.

Other companies, such as SAP and Oracle, have been forced to team up with each other to co-develop OpenStack to try to blunt the lead enjoyed by the trio of cloud giants.

By joining the OpenStack Foundation, SAP will be able to use the project's branding, get itself included in the project's newsletter, and purchase targeted advert keywords relating to it. However, as it is not a "gold" or "platinum" member it won't be able to get a representative easily elected to the OpenStack Foundation board of directors, somewhat limiting its influence over the tech.

"There are ideas in the works where we want to actively contribute, shape it, and work with the community," explained Thomas Grassl, SAP's head of developer relations, in a chat with The Register. "It is a good thing for us to do this through a joint community, and engage with the community."

Though SAP has started selling a variety of cloud-based "as-a-service" technologies, like its HANA Enterprise Cloud and other subscription-based software products, it is not yet using OpenStack internally, Grassl said. "We have huge requirements on the enterprise side, and also new requirements for us... this brings in new requirements we want to co-innovate with the community." ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
BOFH: WHERE did this 'fax-enabled' printer UPGRADE come from?
Don't worry about that cable, it's part of the config
Azure TITSUP caused by INFINITE LOOP
Fat fingered geo-block kept Aussies in the dark
You think the CLOUD's insecure? It's BETTER than UK.GOV's DATA CENTRES
We don't even know where some of them ARE – Maude
Want to STUFF Facebook with blatant ADVERTISING? Fine! But you must PAY
Pony up or push off, Zuck tells social marketeers
Yahoo! blames! MONSTER! email! OUTAGE! on! CUT! CABLE! bungle!
Weekend woe for BT as telco struggles to restore service
Oi, Europe! Tell US feds to GTFO of our servers, say Microsoft and pals
By writing a really angry letter about how it's harming our cloud business, ta
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Website security in corporate America
Find out how you rank among other IT managers testing your website's vulnerabilities.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.