Feeds

EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'

Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

EU countries appear to be divided on how to implement a recent European Court of Justice ruling that calls on Google and other search engines to remove certain links from their indexes.

The 28-state bloc's independent data protection advisory board - the Article 29 working party - met on Tuesday to discuss how removal requests rejected by Google, Microsoft and others should be addressed by members of the European Union at a domestic level.

It said in a statement that a "coordinated and coherent" set of guidelines needed to be agreed on to help EU countries handle complaints from netizens who are dissatisfied with, for example, Google's response.

The Article 29 Party said:

Within the perspective of having a unified European implementation of the judgment, the data protection authorites analysed the different legal bases allowing individuals - regardless of their nationality, their residency and the harm suffered - to invoke the right to request search engines to remove them from indexing.

The precise methods of exercising this right to be forgotten, as well as search engines' potential refusal to execute this right was also studied in an in-depth manner.

The body added that it was important for EU citizens to understand the "precise reasons" why a search engine can chuck out their requests.

Google claimed to have received thousands of de-link submissions immediately after the ruling was applied in mid-May. On the other hand, Microsoft's Bing search engine, which has only a 2.5 per cent share of the market in Europe, is receiving only a trickle of requests from its users. The Register understands that just 12 complaints about Bing search links hit Microsoft in the first few days following the judgment.

Just yesterday, Redmond began offering its users a mechanism to submit requests to have links removed that are old, out of date or irrelevant and - significantly - found not to be in the public interest.

The Article 29 Working Party said it planned to meet with Google, Microsoft and other search engines on 24 July to discuss "the practical implementation of the key principles in this CJEU case".

Guidelines from the EU's independent privacy advisor are expected to follow in the autumn - assuming that all parties reach some form of consensus on exactly what the approach should be. Some might argue that that clarity was already provided by the judges in their ruling. But Google, it's fair to surmise, is likely to do its best to disrupt the process, given its repeated and partially successful PR attempts to trash the decision to date. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Docker's app containers are coming to Windows Server, says Microsoft
MS chases app deployment speeds already enjoyed by Linux devs
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
'Urika': Cray unveils new 1,500-core big data crunching monster
6TB of DRAM, 38TB of SSD flash and 120TB of disk storage
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
SDI wars: WTF is software defined infrastructure?
This time we play for ALL the marbles
Windows 10: Forget Cloudobile, put Security and Privacy First
But - dammit - It would be insane to say 'don't collect, because NSA'
Oracle hires former SAP exec for cloudy push
'We know Larry said cloud was gibberish, and insane, and idiotic, but...'
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Win a year’s supply of chocolate
There is no techie angle to this competition so we're not going to pretend there is, but everyone loves chocolate so who cares.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.