Feeds

German NSA probe chief mulls spy-busting typewriters

Manual typewriters, too, not fancy electric ones subject to American electrickery

Reducing security risks from open source software

Germany's government has mulled a return to typewriters in a bid to evade US spy agencies, according to the head of the nation's National Security Agency inquiry.

The incredible decision came in response to a torrent of allegations that the NSA had spied on the German agencies and parties including Chancellor Angela Merkel.

It prompted Merkel to last week expel America's CIA chief in Berlin and fire another in a series of salvos at the US surveillance complex stating that "spying is ultimately a waste of force".

The head of the Bundestag's NSA inquiry and Christian Democrat politician Patrick Sensburg told the German Morgenmagazin program the group was seriously considering manual typewriters as a means to avoid spying.

"As a matter of fact, we have [considered typewriters] – and not electronic models either", Sensburg said.

Other committee members struck back at the remarks stating they were laughable and damaging to the integrity of the inquiry.


Opposition committee member Martina Renner said on Twitter she'd sooner get rid of the Secret Service than start using typewriters, or burning little notes after reading.

Social Democratic Party committee rep Christian Flisek also took to Twitter in opposition of the call for retro word processing labelling the idea "ridiculous" and not a normal part of counter-surveillance.

Russia was, Vulture South contends, already using mechanical typewriters and had bought a pricey fleet of 20 more post Snowden's NSA spying allegations.

It was unclear if Russia bought the Olympia and Triumph typewriters for counter-surveillance purposes or merely for nostalgia. ®

Mobile application security vulnerability report

More from The Register

next story
LibreSSL RNG bug fix: What's all the forking fuss about, ask devs
Blow to bit-spitter 'tis but a flesh wound, claim team
Microsoft: You NEED bad passwords and should re-use them a lot
Dirty QWERTY a perfect P@ssword1 for garbage websites
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
NUDE SNAPS AGENCY: NSA bods love 'showing off your saucy selfies'
Swapping other people's sexts is a fringe benefit, says Snowden
Own a Cisco modem or wireless gateway? It might be owned by someone else, too
Remote code exec in HTTP server hands kit to bad guys
British data cops: We need greater powers and more money
You want data butt kicking, we need bigger boots - ICO
Crooks fling banking Trojan at Japanese smut site fans
Wait - they're doing online banking with an unpatched Windows PC?
NIST told to grow a pair and kick NSA to the curb
Lrn2crypto, oversight panel tells US govt's algorithm bods
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Mobile application security vulnerability report
The alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, and the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.