Feeds

Mozilla and Facebook snip a further five per cent from all JPEGs

New mozjpeg 2.0 flattens cats without perturbing pics

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Just four months after loosing the mozjpeg encoder on a waiting world, Mozilla has updated it to version 2.0, at the same time announcing that Facebook is testing the new iteration.

The Social NetworkTM has also slung Mozilla $US60,000 towards the development effort in anticipation of mozjpeg 3.0.

Mozjpeg, first released in March, was a bow to the tyranny of the installed base: everybody wants a faster Web, but everybody wants to stick with the formats they're using now. So the original iteration took the open source JPEG encoder and mashed it up with the jpgcrush utility, so as to reduce file sizes without sacrificing quality.

This arrangement, Mozilla said at the time, cut file sizes by 10 per cent.

The new mozjpeg 2.0 snips another 5 per cent off files, according to Mozilla's announcement.

It achieves this with better quantization, according to the post: “The major feature in this release is trellis quantization, which improves compression for both baseline and progressive JPEGs without sacrificing anything in terms of compatibility. Previous versions of mozjpeg only improved compression for progressive JPEGs.”

Other features include support for JPEG input in the cjpeg utility, “to simplify re-compression workflows”, various tuning options, and “We now generate a single DC [discrete cosine – ed] scan by default in order to be compatible with decoders that can’t handle arbitrary DC scans”.

The test suite has also been changed to make it easier for others to reproduce Mozilla's test results, the post states. “All metric code is now written in C, which means it runs faster and MATLAB/octave is no longer required. We’ve also added a script to automatically generate graphs from the test data files.”

The organisation has also published a study into the performance of mozjpeg, which (hardly surprisingly) shows it outperforms Microsoft's JPEG XR, the Google-backed WebP, and HEVC-MSP (from MPEG and the ITU). ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
Munich considers dumping Linux for ... GULP ... Windows!
Give a penguinista a hug, the Outlook's not good for open source's poster child
Intel's Raspberry Pi rival Galileo can now run Windows
Behold the Internet of Things. Wintel Things
Linux Foundation says many Linux admins and engineers are certifiable
Floats exam program to help IT employers lock up talent
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
Eat up Martha! Microsoft slings handwriting recog into OneNote on Android
Freehand input on non-Windows kit for the first time
Linux kernel devs made to finger their dongles before contributing code
Two-factor auth enabled for Kernel.org repositories
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.