Feeds

Remember when Google+ outed everyone by their real names? Now Google's sorry

Ad giant axes hated policy on identities

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

In another attempt to get someone, anyone, spending time on Google+, the Chocolate Factory has abandoned its “real names only” policy.

The policy has been criticised for its entire existence. The company began deleting accounts that didn't pass its real-names test in 2011, without any particular consistency of enforcement. In the same year, it emerged that even real names had to pass Google's particular cultural tests to be accepted.

In 2012, it offered the trivial concession of allowing users to list their nicknames in their profiles. However, the no-pseudonyms policy remained ironclad.

Google boss Eric Schmidt weighed in, defending the policy on the basis that Google+ was meant to be an "identity service".

Mountain View has now raised the white flag, reversing the policy while defending its former existence. Its original policy, the announcement says “helped create a community made up of real people, but it also excluded a number of people who wanted to be part of it without using their real names.”

“Today, we are taking the last step: there are no more restrictions on what name you can use,” Google says.

“We know that our names policy has been unclear, and this has led to some unnecessarily difficult experiences for some of our users. For this we apologise, and we hope that today's change is a step toward making Google+ the welcoming and inclusive place that we want it to be.”

Google+ chief architect Yonatan Zunger noted in response to concerns that the policy change makes it “come out and play” time for trolls, that “One of the reasons this is safe to launch is that our troll-smashing department has gotten very good at their jobs.” ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
Vodafone to buy 140 Phones 4u stores from stricken retailer
887 jobs 'preserved' in the process, says administrator PwC
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
Surprise: if you work from home you need the Internet
Buffer-rage sends Aussies out to experience road rage
EE buys 58 Phones 4u stores for £2.5m after picking over carcass
Operator says it will safeguard 359 jobs, plans lick of paint
MOST iPhone strokers SPURN iOS 8: iOS 7 'un-updatening' in 5...4...
Guess they don't like our battery-draining update?
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.