Feeds

UK Parliament rubber-stamps EMERGENCY data grab 'n' keep bill

Just 49 MPs oppose Drip's rushed timetable

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications

Britain's politicians waved through a motion today in which they agreed that the Home Secretary Theresa May's "emergency" Data Retention and Investigatory Powers bill should be swiftly pushed through Parliament.

Only 49 MPs voted against the motion, while 436 politicos rubber-stamped Drip's hastily cobbled together timetable.

A second reading of the draft law is taking place in the House of Commons now. It's expected to be passed by Thursday, after scrutiny in the Lords and just days before MPs break for the summer recess on 22 July.

The bill gained cross-party support late last week, and MPs have since tabled a number of amendments to Drip.

May indicated this afternoon that a six-month review of the legislation demanded by the Labour Party would be accepted by the Tory-led government.

She reiterated that the rushed through law was necessary to "put beyond doubt the [UK's] law of interception". The Home Sec also claimed that there would be "no change to the definitions of communication data that already existed".

As May wound down her Parliamentary lobbying, the Secretary of State once again said that the proposed law had nothing to do with her unloved Communications Data Bill. She said it was "emphatically not what we are considering today."

Labour's shadow home secretary Yvette Cooper said that people will only continue to support such powers if "safeguards aren't abused". She said trust among the British public was low because the government was rushing the bill through Parliament.

Nonetheless, Cooper said: "We cannot reject this legislation; it would be wrong to do so."

The MP added that it could be used "to get the wider debate we need" on surveillance laws in Blighty, which includes a full review of the Regulation Investigatory Powers Act - a legislation passed by the then-Labour government in 2000. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
BBC goes offline in MASSIVE COCKUP: Stephen Fry partly muzzled
Auntie tight-lipped as major outage rolls on
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple ran off to IBM
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
Nadella: Apps must run on ALL WINDOWS – PCs, slabs and mobes
Phone egg, meet desktop chicken - your mother
HP, Microsoft prove it again: Big Business doesn't create jobs
SMEs get lip service - what they need is dinner at the Club
ITC: Seagate and LSI can infringe Realtek patents because Realtek isn't in the US
Land of the (get off scot) free, when it's a foreign owner
Samsung threatens to cut ties with supplier over child labour allegations
Vows to uphold 'zero tolerance' policy on underage workers
Dude, you're getting a Dell – with BITCOIN: IT giant slurps cryptocash
1. Buy PC with Bitcoin. 2. Mine more coins. 3. Goto step 1
There's NOTHING on TV in Europe – American video DOMINATES
Even France's mega subsidies don't stop US content onslaught
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
prev story

Whitepapers

Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.