Feeds

Hybrid upstart Tintri: Legacy vendors? We're eating their lunch

Claims VM-aware hybrid biz is growing...

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Hybrid flash/disk array startup Tintri claims its business is growing and eating into the sales of traditional array vendors.

Tintri’s VMstore provides storage resources for VMware virtual machines (VMs) without the sysadmin needing to know about LUNs and other traditional storage array abstractions. The arrays are VM-centric in their operation and management.

Tintri's claims:

  • Customers have deployed 200,000 virtual machines (VMs) with its VMstore arrays – a near doubling in six months
  • Customers are storing more than 16PB of user data in its arrays
  • Consecutive triple digit quarterly growth year-on-year
  • Many new accounts are spending $1m plus on Tintri products and services
  • Close to 70 per cent of Tintri customers made repeat purchases averaging 2.5x of their initial order
  • There are more than 1,000 Tintri-certified end-user IT professionals across 31 countries – an increase of 354 per cent compared to July 2013

Okay, let’s try to work out how many VMstores Tintri has sold. Assume an average Tintri array stores 100TB of user data. It would need 160 of them to store 1,600TB (16PB). That doesn’t seem that many.

Or assume an average VMstore can handle 50 VMs. It would need 4,000 to handle 200,000 VMs. A hundred VMs per VMstore would mean 2,000 arrays; two hundred would mean 1,000 arrays and 400 would mean 500 arrays.

Tintri is one of three hybrid array startups – the others are Nimble Storage and Tegile – that say they are rampaging through the mainstream legacy array vendors’ customer bases.

Up until now, these vendors have not reported or admitted much or any concern about the three hybrid musketeers’ effects on their businesses. Startups begin from a low base – where 100 per cent growth can sometimes mean going up from two customers to four – but if we assume they carry on growing at the rates they say they are, this will probably change in the next 12 months. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Ellison: Sparc M7 is Oracle's most important silicon EVER
'Acceleration engines' key to performance, security, Larry says
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Lenovo to finish $2.1bn IBM x86 server gobble in October
A lighter snack than expected – but what's a few $100m between friends, eh?
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Oracle crashes all-flash bash: Behold, our hybrid FS1 arrays
Mutant flash/disk box a pillar of storage: It's axiomatic
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.