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iWatch 'due November'... Y'all know what time it is? Now you do

That Tag Heuer guy's barely settled in, right?

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The mythical Apple iWatch will, presumably, tell the time, but that doesn't mean the iThing maker will be punctual in unveiling it, claims an analyst.

Ming-Chi Kuo, Apple watcher, has predicted the mass production of the smartwatch – whose existence has yet to be confirmed by Apple – will not begin until November.

He claimed that a small run will be released in September ahead of an October release, allowing the most ardent fanbois to get their hands on one of the devices. Mass production will begin in November, he claimed, allowing the flakier fanfolk to put an iWatch in their Crimbo stocking.

Kuo predicted that 3 million units would be shipped by the end of the year, way beneath previous expectations of 10 million iWatches.

He writes that it's likely Apple's wearable computer will be enclosed in sapphire glass and have a long, thin screen which is quite different to the usual round watch-face. This screen is supposedly two to three inches in length, to allow users to send and receive voice messages and monitor the results of their exercise regime, should they have one.

The screen is rumoured to feature a AMOLED display covered with sapphire glass.

Apple has been on a hiring spree to snare new employees for its emerging fashion division, including Patrick Pruniaux, former sales and retail vice president at the famous watchmaker TAG Heuer.

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