Feeds

LG unfurls flexible SEE-THROUGH 18-inch display

Roll up, roll up for 60-inch telly scrolls by 2017

New hybrid storage solutions

Not content with making the world’s biggest bendy OLED TV, LG has thrown a different curve entirely with its roll-up OLED display.

The 18-inch flexible panel has a 1280 x 810 resolution and uses a film of high-performance plastic called polyimide to give it its flexibility.

LG flexible display

Outsmarting the bendy smartphone displays, LG rolls out an 18-incher

The screen can be rolled up to a curvature radius of around 3cm without loss of function – needless to say, the idea of a digital roll-up newspaper hasn’t been lost on the designers. But whether you’d be carrying the 60-inch version to the bog in 2017 – when the company suggests the kit could be on sale – is another matter.

Sony rollable display

Sony's roll-able display from 2010

It’s not the first time we’ve seen flexible displays touted. Back in 2010 Sony unfurled its 4.1-inch OTFT-driven OLED display with a 432 x 240-pixel resolution, which could wrap around a pencil while still presenting a picture.

In recent years, LG rival Samsung has also bent over backwards to introduce a 5.7-inch bendy display for smartphones using AMOLED tech.

LG ePaper display

Been there, done that – LG's prototype rollable E-Ink display

But if you’re serious about reading, then possibly the more practical E-Ink alternative would serve you best, especially as this lightweight monochrome design has exceptionally low power consumption. Sony has been involved here too in developing a 13.3-inch E-Ink digital paper product called Mobius.

However, LG got there first with its prototype 19-inch ePaper display in 2010.

Yet with the new roll-up, LG Display full colour panel, one of its unique benefits is you can see through it when it's not being used. Thanks to its transparent pixel technology, it delivers 30 per cent transmittance, which the company expects to increase to 40 per cent when its larger panels are rolled out.

LG flexible display

Besides flexbility, transparency is set to be a major selling point

No doubt the transparency factor will catch on in digital signage applications and in the home too, where the ever-increasing size of black rectangles is blot on many a living room's leisurely landscape. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Why Oracle CEO Larry Ellison had to go ... Except he hasn't
Silicon Valley's veteran seadog in piratical Putin impression
Big Content Australia just blew a big hole in its credibility
AHEDA's research on average content prices did not expose methodology, so appears less than rigourous
Bono: Apple will sort out monetising music where the labels failed
Remastered so hard it would be difficult or impossible to master it again
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.