Feeds

Dammit, Foxconn: Where's our 1 MILLION-strong robot ARMY?

'Foxbots' just aren't good enough to take up the slack

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Foxconn's much-vaunted robot army will do little more than insert screws, polish parts and assist human workers, it has been claimed.

A report in the Taiwanese press has suggested that "Foxbots" are nowhere near sophisticated enough to replace real people in Foxconn's factories, which have been the scene of worker suicides.

Sadly, the unhappy Foxconn cohort will get no robotic reprieve from life as an iAssembler, as it looks like the Foxbot has only the most basic of skills.

The robot army will still need human oversight of its work, according to Taiwan's United Daily News.

"The industry believes that the initial production of Foxconn robots play an auxiliary role [and] will mainly be used in larger manufacturing process, such as the appearance ... locking screws, components and polished appearance, which means that Foxconn carried out through mobile phone assembly robot technology has considerable the breakthrough is expected to be pulled high yield and output," the newspaper reported. (via Google Translate)

"The robot still needs the naked eye can not distinguish subtle assembly or manufacturing process, and therefore such as quality control, precision components and assembly steps, which still rely on manpower." [sic]

Once upon a time (which means 2011, if we're being precise, Foxconn said it would replace most of its factory workforce with robots by 2014. No such luck.

The news will come as a blow to Apple and Foxconn itself, because it's a lot cheaper and easier to replace human beings with robots, who aren't known for forming unions or attempting suicide. Or leaking a demo model of the iPhone 6. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Germany strikes again over Amazon warehouse pay
Employees to walk out in long-running wage dispute
Phones 4u demise: 1,700 employees laid off with redundo package
'Limited interest in remaining 362 stores', says administrator PwC
Amazon hiring in Australia for 'new and confidential Amazon Fresh initiative'
Is Jeff Bezos moving his grocery business beyond the US West Coast?
Blighty's mighty tech skills shortage drives best job growth in years
Doesn't anyone know anything about SQL? Or Java? Or Linux? Or programming? Or...
Microsoft changes cert test providers, hints at fun new exams
If you really love taking tests with Prometric, do 'em before Christmas
Symantec security chap signs for CSIRO's ICT In Schools
Vulture South is closing in on our goal of 20 new recruits to help teachers and kids
A-level results: Before you smile at that jump-for-joy snap...
Uni-ditching teens are COMING FOR YOUR JOBS
How to promote CSIRO's ICT in Schools in your community
Vulture South is closing in on its target to find volunteers to help teach tech in schools
Everyone's an IoT expert but now there's a certificate to prove it
Cisco creates Certification of Things for industrial sensor-footlers
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.