Feeds

But WE want to rule the Internet of STUFF – Intel, Dell, Samsung & chums

Going up against Microsoft, Cisco, Qualcomm and their lot

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Intel, Dell, Samsung and Broadcom – among others – have founded a yet another group, dubbed the “Open Interconnect Consortium”, to promote standards that help development of the Internet of Things.

The new consortium says it “will seek to define a common communication framework based on industry standard technologies to wirelessly connect and intelligently manage the flow of information among devices, regardless of form factor, operating system or service provider.”

The group also says “It is our intention to create a specification and an open source project that will allow interoperability for all types of devices and operating systems.”

How will that be done? We've only the statement that “ Additional technical details will be announced at a later time” to go on for now.

The launch comes just six days after Microsoft pledged its troth to the Allseen Alliance, a group that says its aim is “To enable widespread adoption and help accelerate the development and evolution of an interoperable peer connectivity and communications framework based on AllJoyn for devices and applications in the Internet of Everything.”

Are the two groups different? The Open Interconnect Consortium (OIC) offers the following description of its differences with rivals:

“Today, there are multiple forums driving different approaches to solve the challenge of IoT connectivity and interoperability. Currently, we don’t see one single effort that addresses all the necessary requirements. The companies involved in OIC believe that secure and reliable device discovery and connectivity is a foundational capability to enable IoT. The companies also believe that a common, interoperable approach is essential, and that both a standard and open source implementation are the best route to enable scale.”

That statement seems a little odd as the Allseen Alliance's spiel says its “... members are collaborating on a universal software framework, based on AllJoyn open source code, that allows devices to autonomously discover and interact with nearby products regardless of their underlying proprietary technology or communications protocols.”

Can the OIC succeed? With just Intel (plus subsidiary Wind River), Dell, Samsung, Broadcom and Amtel aboard, it trails the Allseen Alliance's fifty members handily. That the latter outfit can boast Cicso as a community member, plus Microsoft, Haier, LG, Panasonic, Qualcomm, Sharp, Silicon Image, Technicolor and TP-Link as full members perhaps makes it a little more formidable.

It is early days for the Internet of Things, so it is possible that the two bodies decide they have have enough in common to collaborate. For now, that Microsoft has joined one body and Intel the other may raise eyebrows, although with precious little detail of either group's approach available it's hard to read anything into the two companies' decisions. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Preview redux: Microsoft ships new Windows 10 build with 7,000 changes
Latest bleeding-edge bits borrow Action Center from Windows Phone
Google opens Inbox – email for people too thick to handle email
Print this article out and give it to someone tech-y if you get stuck
Microsoft promises Windows 10 will mean two-factor auth for all
Sneak peek at security features Redmond's baking into new OS
UNIX greybeards threaten Debian fork over systemd plan
'Veteran Unix Admins' fear desktop emphasis is betraying open source
Entity Framework goes 'code first' as Microsoft pulls visual design tool
Visual Studio database diagramming's out the window
Google+ goes TITSUP. But WHO knew? How long? Anyone ... Hello ...
Wobbly Gmail, Contacts, Calendar on the other hand ...
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.