Feeds

Future Apple gumble could lock fanbois out of their own devices

Travelling outside your own hood? Just in case ... *clang*

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Apple has filed a patent for a new location-sensitive security system which could leave fanbois' fumbling to get into their iDevices if they travel to unusual locations.

The patent application describes "location-sensitive security levels and setting profiles based on detected location". It's basically describes a system which changes the security level of a mobile device based on its location.

The system would sense a device's proximity to other devices, networks or locations, before deciding the level of security that is required.

Using a bit of creative license, this would mean that fanbois need to bash a password into their phone whilst traversing the gritty urban jungle of, say, East London. Whereas if they were in the rather duller streets of Bath, where muggers are outnumbered by aristocratic pensioners, no password would be needed.

Alternatively, Apple suggested that when hanging out in "the cafeteria", a much longer password might be required - which says a lot about what might really be going on inside Cupertino.

In its patent application, the fruity firm wrote: "To provide a reliably pleasant and secure experience for a user operating a mobile device, it can be desirable to modify security settings or other device behavior based on a detected location. Mobile device users often frequent the same locations. Mobile devices can be configured to detect the current location. Based on the detected current location, the mobile device can modify settings and configurations. Security settings are one example of device behavior that can be modified in accordance with embodiments of the present invention."

Other settings could potentially be changed, so that perhaps "at home, a user might want the lock-screen image to be a personal photo, but while at work, the user might want a professional photo" - presumably a fully clothed one. ®

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
Regin: The super-spyware the security industry has been silent about
NSA fingered as likely source of complex malware family
Why did it take antivirus giants YEARS to drill into super-scary Regin? Symantec responds...
FYI this isn't just going to target Windows, Linux and OS X fans
Privacy bods offer GOV SPY VICTIMS a FREE SPYWARE SNIFFER
Looks for gov malware that evades most antivirus
Patch NOW! Microsoft slings emergency bug fix at Windows admins
Vulnerability promotes lusers to domain overlords ... oops
HACKERS can DELETE SURVEILLANCE DVRS remotely – report
Hikvision devices wide open to hacking, claim securobods
'Regin': The 'New Stuxnet' spook-grade SOFTWARE WEAPON described
'A degree of technical competence rarely seen'
Astro-boffins start opening universe simulation data
Got a supercomputer? Want to simulate a universe? Here you go
You stupid BRICK! PCs running Avast AV can't handle Windows fixes
Fix issued, fingers pointed, forums in flames
prev story

Whitepapers

Driving business with continuous operational intelligence
Introducing an innovative approach offered by ExtraHop for producing continuous operational intelligence.
Why CIOs should rethink endpoint data protection in the age of mobility
Assessing trends in data protection, specifically with respect to mobile devices, BYOD, and remote employees.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Protecting against web application threats using SSL
SSL encryption can protect server‐to‐server communications, client devices, cloud resources, and other endpoints in order to help prevent the risk of data loss and losing customer trust.