Feeds

Amazon snubs FTC: We'll see you in court over kids' in-app cash blowouts

Don't tar us with Apple's brush says Bezos & Co

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

Amazon has said it won't acquiesce to the Federal Trade Commission's plans to punish it for not preventing kids from running up in-app purchases on mummy and daddy's credit card.

The FTC is seeking a punitive fine from Amazon, similar to the one levied on Apple. The agency says Amazon wasn't quick enough to crack down on unauthorized purchasing by children within applications running on its Android-based tablets and smartphones. Such purchases are usually extra weapons, map packs and similar gumble for games, and naturally Amazon takes a cut.

The g-men also accuse Amazon of not refunding money fast enough when parents complain, and they want to have a 20-year oversight over the company to make sure that this doesn't happen in the future. But Bezos and Co are having none of it after the FTC published its proposals.

"It's an understatement to say that this is deeply disappointing," said Andrew DeVore, an Amazon associate general counsel, in the letter sent on Tuesday – a copy of which The Register has seen.

"The commission's unwillingness to depart from the precedent it set with Apple despite our very different facts leaves us no choice but to defend our approach in court."

DeVore pointed out that Amazon has always refunded unauthorized purchases promptly and that it had included prominent signs on its website warning that purchases must be approved by the cred card or account holder.

At all times Amazon's conduct has been lawful, DeVore said, and the fact that the FTC was seeking to treat it the same way as Apple wasn't fair. Therefore, if the FTC wants its pound of flesh it will have to fight for it in court. ®

Application security programs and practises

More from The Register

next story
ONE EMAIL costs mining company $300 MEEELION
Environmental activist walks free after hoax sent share price over a cliff
HP, Microsoft prove it again: Big Business doesn't create jobs
SMEs get lip service - what they need is dinner at the Club
ITC: Seagate and LSI can infringe Realtek patents because Realtek isn't in the US
Land of the (get off scot) free, when it's a foreign owner
Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold
Ministry of Fun confirms: Yes, we're busy doing nothing
UK.gov's Open Source switch WON'T get rid of Microsoft, y'know
What do you mean, we've ditched Redmond in favour of IBM?!
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
Putin: Crack Tor for me and I'll make you a MILLIONAIRE
Russian Interior Ministry offers big pile o' roubles for busting pro-privacy browser
Apple smacked with privacy sueball over Location Services
Class action launched on behalf of 100 million iPhone owners
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.