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MongoDB pops up in Microsoft and Google data centers

Oracle's NoSQL nightmare inks new pacts, gets into all major clouds

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Those expert dealmakers at MongoDB have done it again and have announced freshly-inked agreements that will loft the company's NoSQL database into Google and Microsoft's cloudy data centers.

The company announced on Tuesday that it had sealed pacts with the two companies to make it easier for developers to launch MongoDB databases on top of their respective clouds.

With these new relationships the company has gained a foothold in all three of the major clouds. (It already had a relationship with Amazon that made it available on the company's eponymous marketplace. – Ed)

By partnering with the big companies, MongoDB has cut the steps it takes for developers to get the database humming in public clouds, with MongoDB now available as an Add-On in the Microsoft Azure Store, and also via a preview "Click to Deploy" button on Google.

"Fundamentally we want developers to be able to bring up a Mongo cluster on any infrastructure they want very easily," explained MongoDB's CTO, Eliot Horowitz, in a chat with El Reg. "Technically, people have been running DBs on their cloud infrastructure for a while so it was just a matter of the integration."

As any entrepreneur knows, if you aren't sticking your product in front of punters it's hard to sell it, so MongoDB's deals are a big factor in its broad developer adoption.

These agreements follow a spate of activity in the past few months that has seen the company join Pivotal's "Cloud Foundry Foundation" to help tie its system closer to the company's eponymous platform-as-a-service, link its sales and marketing and technology organizations with Hadoop-expert Cloudera, and team up with IBM to make it easier for MongoDB apps to work with data kept in DB2 and WebSphere - and vice versa.

With the new Google and Microsoft agreements, the company appears just as keen to make its database prevalent in the cloud as it is to be ubiquitous in on-premises tech.

Though MongoDB isn't yet in the same league as the database incumbents it's trying to displace, it's doing a better job of getting its name out there than its young rivals DataStax, Couchbase and EnterpriseDB. ®

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