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REAR-END my CLOUD: HDS embiggens its object storage

Stick your content whereever you please

HP ProLiant Gen8: Integrated lifecycle automation

Cloud back-ending is becoming more and more popular with storage system vendors and HDS has added cloud as a storage tier to its HCP object storage offering.

The HCP (Hitachi Content Platform) supports so-called adaptive cloud tiering which supports the automated movement of data "to and from a choice of leading public clouds from Google, Amazon and Microsoft based on changes in demand and policies set by the organisation."

HCP Anywhere provides mobile device access to HCP storage and HDI (Hitachi Data Ingestor) inputs data into HCP, being a kind of cloud data on-ramp. The latest releases of HCP Anywhere and HDI provide always-on, secure access to data from any IP-enabled device, including mobile phones, tablets, and remote company locations.

HDS's canned quote says: "HCP Anywhere also acts as a single point of control for user sync and share, and remote office/branch office file services."

The three products, HCP, HCP Anywhere and HDI, are available in software-only form.

What we have here is a widespread and wide-access storage environment. Users just see a file-access resource - one virtual silo - wherever they are and whatever device they use. It's simple for them, looked at this way, but simple in product and function details it is not.

Data can be stored locally and remotely, including in the public cloud, and accessed both by static, office-bound and mobile workers using a variety of end-point devices; smartphones, tablets and notebook computers. Files can be synchronised and shared between users and their devices, with the system looking after security and access controls. It is intrinsically complex and the management and automation facilities have to be good to make it practicable.

HDS says it is "easy to set up, manage, maintain and adapt," and also secure. Hitachi Cloud Transition Services and Hitachi Cloud Services for Content Archiving can help users get on board the HCP train.

This is a technology announcement by HDS and availability information wasn't immediately available. ®

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