Feeds

Dutch firm passes the world's first e-spliff to the left hand side

Doobie or not doobie? That's the question... the cops will ask

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Do you want to be as stoned as Bob Marley but keep on jammin into your middle age? Then you're in luck, because a Dutch firm is riding high after introducing the world's first ever electronic doobie.

The iSpliff is designed by Dutch firm E-Njoint BV and allows no-smoke-tokers to inhale liquid cannabis, using a similar method to electronic cigarettes.

It is designed to be more healthy on the lungs than smoking weed, but still powerful enough to get the user totally bongoed.

The device was dreamed up in Holland, a country that has regulated the sale of marijuana for years.

E-Njoint CEO Menno Contant said: "Holland is well known in the world for its tolerant and liberal attitude toward soft drugs and the introduction of this new product clearly makes a statement.

"As long as you don't bother or disturb other people and stay within the legal boundaries, all is well."

Whilst the device is the first e-cig for the green, there has been a move towards vaporizing cannabis among hardened potheads.

The English rapper Big Narstie, a well known ganja-guzzler, recently released his own brand of vaporizer called the Base Pen, which turns herbal cannabis into an intoxicating vapour.

Smokers too are ditching the cancer sticks and choosing e-cigs, a move which is not entirely welcomed... by the tobacco manufacturers.

There are still concerns about uncharted health risks, as well as paranoid ramblings warnings that the tobacco industry is using the devices to snare a whole generation of new addicts.

Kelly Evans, director of research and campaign group Social Change UK, said: “Young girls told us cigarettes were yucky but e-cigarettes are not as bad.

"They’re attracted to the flavours. If e-cigarettes are just a smoking aid for adults, why a gummy bear flavour?”

Just wait until they get their hands on the digital doobies. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Holy vintage vehicles! Earliest known official Batmobile goes on sale
Riddle me this: are you prepared to pay US$180k?
Bible THUMP: Good Book beats Darwin to most influential tome title
Folio Society crowns fittest of surviving volumes
'Open source just means big companies can steal your code.' O RLY?
Plus: Flame of the Week returns, for one night only!
U wot? Silicon Roundabout set to become Silicon U-BEND
Crap-spouting London upstarts to get permanent road closure
Hey, you, PHONE-FACE! Kickstarter in-car mobe mount will EMBED your phone into your MUG
Stick it on the steering wheel and wait for the airbag to fire
NEWSFLASH: It's time to ditch dullard Facebook chums
Everything hot in tech, courtesy of avian anchor Regina Eggbert
'It is comforting to know where your data centres are.' UK.GOV does NOT
Plus: Anons are 'wannabes', KKK says, before being pwned
Criticism of Uber's journo-Data Analytics plan is an Attack on DIGITAL FREEDOM
First they came for Emil – and I'm damn well SPEAKING OUT
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
The hidden costs of self-signed SSL certificates
Exploring the true TCO for self-signed SSL certificates, including a side-by-side comparison of a self-signed architecture versus working with a third-party SSL vendor.
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.