Feeds

Glastonbury debuts festival wide Wi-Fi network - fitted to COWS

A moo-ving moment in Somerset shindig's history

Boost IT visibility and business value

It's one of the great problems of modern times. How does the average thirty-something festival-goer send their friends a Yo while off their chops in some far-flung field?

Luckily for the ageing denizens of Glastonbury, EE has stepped in with a flock of Wi-Fi equipped cows to make sure no meal remains un-Instagrammed and no snotty musical opinion goes un-tweeted.

The brightly coloured "Highspeed Herd" of fibreglass cows are all fitted with 4G routers and are modelled on the real bovines which call the fields of Worthy Farm home during the festival's fallow periods.

Spencer McHugh, director of brand at EE, said: "Staying connected has become an essential part of any festival-goer's experience and we are thrilled to be back supporting Glastonbury Festival, helping to ensure those on site have the best possible experience."

At the first Glastonbury festival in 1970 revellers were greeted with free milk, whereas nowadays they are more interested in free Wi-Fi and designer yurts.

With this in mind, it could be argued that the Wi-Fi cows are emblematic of the music festival's shift from being a love-in for long hairs to a corporate branding exercise of stratospheric proportions.

When this writer first visited Glastonbury, he paid a fiver to an LSD-dealing pig farmer and was smuggled on site in his truck. Huge numbers of other people leaped the fence or paid off guards to get inside, giving the fes the feeling that people without tickets actually outnumber proper punters.

These days entry is a more controlled affair, with double perimeter fences and even watchtowers to deter rebel revellers from storming inside. The age of Glasto-goers has also crept up since it stopped being a hippy free-for-all, with the average festival attendee aged 36 years of age.

For the ever-aging festival goer, it's no longer about living fast and dying young. As every thirty-something knows, pensions don't pay themselves. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Déjà vu: Virgin Media jacks up broadband prices
Screw copper phone lines, we're UNIQUE, bleats telco
UK fuzz want PINCODES on ALL mobile phones
Met Police calls for mandatory passwords on all new mobes
Netflix swallows yet another bitter pill, inks peering deal with TWC
Net neutrality crusader once again pays up for priority access
New Sprint CEO says he will lower axe on staff – but prices come first
'Very disruptive' new rates to be revealed next week
US TV stations bowl sueball directly at FCC's spectrum mega-sale
Broadcasters upset about coverage and cost as they shift up and down the dials
What's the nature of your emergency, Vodafone?
Oh, you've dialled the wrong number for ad fibs, rules ASA
EE network whacked by 'PDP authentication failure' blunder
Carrier is 'aware' of cockup, working on a fix NOW
ROAD TRIP! An FCC road trip – Leahy demands net neutrality debate across US
You crashed watchdog's site, now time to crash its ears
Google's so smart it's discovered SHARKS HAVE TEETH
Congratulations, world media, for rediscovering submarine cable armour
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
BYOD's dark side: Data protection
An endpoint data protection solution that adds value to the user and the organization so it can protect itself from data loss as well as leverage corporate data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?