Feeds

Cisco open-sources experimental cipher

The Borg want to protect traffic privacy in cloud systems

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Cisco is offering up an experimental cipher which, among other things, could help preserve the anonymity of data in cloud environments.

In putting what it calls “FNR” (Flexible Naor and Reingold) into the hands of the public, The Borg says its work is currently experimental rather than production software.

Cisco software engineer Sashank Dara explains that FNR is a block cipher that works without the need for padding, as happens in ciphers such as AES.

Since AES works on a fixed block length – be it 128, 192 or 256 bits, for example – small blocks of data get bloated when they're encrypted.

This isn't much of a problem for (say) person-to-person messages, given their relatively low volume. However, a cloud provider seeking to gather IP address information for analysis and other purposes will see an awful lot of 32-bit inputs turning into 128-bit outputs, quadrupling the storage requirements if they try to protect the privacy of their customers.

FNR, Dara explains, is designed to encrypt small objects while preserving their input length, making it applicable to “IPv4 addresses, MAC addresses” and other arbitrary strings. It could also encrypt legacy databases containing fields that need their length preserved, reducing the amount of re-engineering required.

The FNR specification, described here (PDF), explains that privacy of fixed-length fields (such as collected in NetFlow formats) is an emerging challenge for cloud providers, who collect lots of telemetry for analysis and don't want to change their field formats to encrypt the information.

FNR proposes “invertible matrices to provide a neat and generic way to achieve pair-wise independence for any arbitrary length”, the paper states.

Cisco's code, licensed under the LPGLv2, is at github. Cisco also provides a demonstration application using IPv4 address encryption as the example. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Ice cream headache as black hat hacks sack Dairy Queen
I scream, you scream, we all scream 'DATA BREACH'!
Goog says patch⁵⁰ your Chrome
64-bit browser loads cat vids FIFTEEN PERCENT faster!
NIST to sysadmins: clean up your SSH mess
Too many keys, too badly managed
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
Researchers camouflage haxxor traps with fake application traffic
Honeypots sweetened to resemble actual workloads, complete with 'secure' logins
Attack flogged through shiny-clicky social media buttons
66,000 users popped by malicious Flash fudging add-on
New Snowden leak: How NSA shared 850-billion-plus metadata records
'Federated search' spaffed info all over Five Eyes chums
Three quarters of South Korea popped in online gaming raids
Records used to plunder game items, sold off to low lifes
Oz fed police in PDF redaction SNAFU
Give us your metadata, we'll publish your data
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.