Feeds

LinkedIn ignored SIX WARNINGS about account-hijacking bug

Researcher says SSL is done right for US and EU but the rest of you are open to MitM attack

Using blade systems to cut costs and sharpen efficiencies

LinkedIn accounts can be hijacked through simple man in the middle (MITM) attacks due to a failure to promptly fix a SSL stripping vulnerability .

The flaw described ambitiously as a zero-day vulnerability allowed attackers to gain full control of a user's account after they had logged in via SSL.

Attackers could jump between the user and the service and replace the secure protocol with HTTP allowing access to their account.

User IDs, passwords and all LinkedIn data could then be siphoned off by attackers.

All users outside of Europe and the US who did not tick a box to activate optional HTTPS beyond the login screen were vulnerable to the attack, Zimperium boss Zuk Avraham said in a post.

"Through a relatively straightforward MITM attack that leverages an SSL stripping technique, hackers can steal a user’s credentials and gain full control of the user’s account," Avraham said.

"We have reached out to LinkedIn six times over the last year to bring this critical vulnerability to their attention and have urged them to improve their network security, but more than a year after disclosing the bug they have yet to implement a patch for this vulnerability.

"When the victim types email and password, it’ll be sent over the network in an unencrypted form that can be easily read by any attacker – even the most amateur ones."

Avraham used his companies hacking tool to demonstrate the attack against his own account. He said accounts could be randomly accessed via the same flaw affecting LinkedIn's mobile app.

He warned that attackers could soil an organisations' reputation by breaking into their account and changing details or sending out messages.

Vimeo

LinkedIn has been gradually implementing full SSL across its websites since December last year and is testing various techniques to handle mixed content and speed up page loading under the tighter security arrangements.

Update

LinkedIn has provided us with the following statement about the issues raised by Zimperium:

"LinkedIn is committed to protecting the security of our members. In December 2013 we started transitioning the LinkedIn site to default HTTPS and just last week announced that we are serving all traffic to all users in US and EU by default over HTTPS. This issue does not impact the vast majority of LinkedIn members given our ongoing global release of HTTPS by default." ®

The smart choice: opportunity from uncertainty

More from The Register

next story
Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network
'Prevent people that are passing by to hook up to your network', pleads plod
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
NEW, SINISTER web tracking tech fingerprints your computer by making it draw
Have you been on YouPorn lately, perhaps? White House website?
LibreSSL RNG bug fix: What's all the forking fuss about, ask devs
Blow to bit-spitter 'tis but a flesh wound, claim team
Black Hat anti-Tor talk smashed by lawyers' wrecking ball
Unmasking hidden users is too hot for Carnegie-Mellon
Attackers raid SWISS BANKS with DNS and malware bombs
'Retefe' trojan uses clever spin on old attacks to grant total control of bank accounts
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
Don't look, Snowden: Security biz chases Tails with zero-day flaws alert
Exodus vows not to sell secrets of whistleblower's favorite OS
prev story

Whitepapers

Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.