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Yes. App that lets you say 'Yo' raises 1 MEEELLION DOLLARS

One word? We can think of at least two

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How much would you pay for an app that only allows users to send one word? A couple of quid?

Well, investors have forked out a good deal more to fund an app called Yo, which allows users to transmit just the word "yo" and nothing else.

The team has already raised $1m in funding and boasts 50,000 users who have sent a total of 4 million Yo messages.

Developer Or Arbel built the app in just eight hours. He claimed the “context-based communications” could be used by businesses as well as, well, youths who say "Yo".

Arbel moved from his home in Israel to San Francisco to launch the app, where he opened an office and began to hire staff.

"You usually understand what the Yo means based on who you get it from and when you get it," he said.

Its key appeal is that a message can be sent in just two clicks, rather than the 11 required to send a text with the message: "Yo."

One of the highest profile organisations to join in the Yo-volution is The Sun, which tweeted its support of the new app:

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Buzzfeed is all over Yo. It tweeted:

Definitely one of its more incisive posts.

Another Twitter user said "communicating with 0 characters seems Orwellian, or like a baby crying for attention," whatever that means.

It may disconcert investors to hear that there is already an app called Yo!+, which allows Malaysian people to send virtual greetings cards.

The firm behind the app wrote: "Yo! is a mobile greetings application with a tinge of Malaysian spice. Simply put, it sends greetings to your friends - Malaysian style. Instead of the boring old " Dear Bryan, I wish you good health. From someone who always remembers you" you can Malaysian-ise your greetings to "Yo! Bryan macha! Nak yumcha together tak?"

"Yo!" allows us to further embrace and express our Malaysian-ess, the beautiful local culture we shouldn't hide even from our fellow countrymen."

A bit more high-minded than the trendy monosyllabic software, about which El Reg can think of at least two words to say, at least one of which is unprintable. ®

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