Feeds

THREE'S A CLOUD! Microsoft veep says only Azure, Amazon, Google can do hyper space

No hint of a threesome between rivals, though

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

There are only three companies capable of delivering hyperscale cloud computing, the head of Microsoft’s Azure declared yesterday.

After years of cloud tub-thumping, it was inevitable that marketers would need a new modifier or level of hyperbole, and “hyper” is the obvious next choice. Definitions are elastic, but it's agreed hyper-gear can ramp up to handle exponential increases in demand with no hiccups.

Jason Zander, corporate veep of Windows Azure engineering, told the crowd at the Cloud World Forum in London yesterday, there were only “three vendors in the hyperscale world”.

The first is, inevitably, Microsoft with its own Azure offering; Zander took the opportunity to highlight the platform’s underpinning of first-person-shooter splatter-fest Titanfall, which avails itself of 100,000 cores within the Azure cloud.

The second, he said, were “our neighbours in Seattle”, which we’ll assume is Amazon, rather than Starbucks.

The third, said Zander, were some mysterious “friends down the coast in California”.

This opens up a range of possibilities. Facebook, home of friends real and pretend, is based down there, but doesn't really pimp out its data centres.

Zander was speaking at session sponsored by Hewlett-Packard, and was sandwiched between speakers from HP and Oracle. So, is there room for another ageing computer firm in the hyper world?

No, it would appear. Neither of these contenders fit the Microsoft definition of hyper – and Zander confirmed to us he was referring to Google.

Microsoft has about 15 data centres in its Azure network, including two in China. Just to rub salt in any wounds Zander may have inflicted on its rivals' pride, he noted that IBM – making its own bid for hypercloud domination with Softlayer – and Amazon had made declarations of intent to open data centres in the middle Kingdom, but only Microsoft had actually made it ashore so far. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
NSA SOURCE CODE LEAK: Information slurp tools to appear online
Now you can run your own intelligence agency
Azure TITSUP caused by INFINITE LOOP
Fat fingered geo-block kept Aussies in the dark
Yahoo! blames! MONSTER! email! OUTAGE! on! CUT! CABLE! bungle!
Weekend woe for BT as telco struggles to restore service
Cloud unicorns are extinct so DiData cloud mess was YOUR fault
Applications need to be built to handle TITSUP incidents
Stop the IoT revolution! We need to figure out packet sizes first
Researchers test 802.15.4 and find we know nuh-think! about large scale sensor network ops
Turnbull should spare us all airline-magazine-grade cloud hype
Box-hugger is not a dirty word, Minister. Box-huggers make the cloud WORK
SanDisk vows: We'll have a 16TB SSD WHOPPER by 2016
Flash WORM has a serious use for archived photos and videos
Astro-boffins start opening universe simulation data
Got a supercomputer? Want to simulate a universe? Here you go
Do you spend ages wasting time because of a bulging rack?
No more cloud-latency tea breaks for you, users! Get a load of THIS
prev story

Whitepapers

10 ways wire data helps conquer IT complexity
IT teams can automatically detect problems across the IT environment, spot data theft, select unique pieces of transaction payloads to send to a data source, and more.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
How to determine if cloud backup is right for your servers
Two key factors, technical feasibility and TCO economics, that backup and IT operations managers should consider when assessing cloud backup.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.